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ParNcipaNon
Counts!
Remember when yo1'lr teacher said, "Participation counts"?
Today it counts more than ever.
When Marist College seeks funding for important projects ranging from much-needed
scholarships and lab equipment to support for our new
library,
prospective donors always ask, "How
well do your alumni support you?"
With half of
Marist's
alumni under
the
age of 30,
it
will take some time for
Marist to
show the
giving record of an older institution. But one thing everyone can do
is
give what he or she is able
to.
That's
where fund-raising participation comes
in.
When
you give to the Mari st Fund, regardless
of
the
amount, you are telling others
tr1at
you value your
Marist
experience, and that
they
should, too.
Your
participation
also helps attract top students to Marist. U.S. News and World Report's
America's Best Colleges rates schools on, among other criteria, the number of graduates who give
annually to their alma mater.
So when you are contacted for
the
1997
Marist Fund
campaign, remember the words of your
teacher: Participation counts.
For more
Information
about the Marlst Fund, please
contact
Jennifer Dubuque
'87,
Director of Annual Giving,
at
(914)
575-FUND
(575-3863).








































contents
MARIST
MAGAZINE
8-Momings
on the
Hudson
12-Marist's
first 50 years
14--Alumna directs "The Orphan Trains"
16--For future reference
FEATURES
6
8
11
12
............................
Gui1ding
Light
Jack Gartland's 40
years of
dedicated
community service
have
immeasurably
improved the quality of life throughout the mid-Hudson
Valley.
A Hudson
River
Heritage
Poughkeepsie
once
reigned as the
"Rowing
Capital"
of
the
world.
Marist College
is
carrying on this
Hudson
River tradition.
Ma1~ist
Men's
Basketball:
Standing
Tall
The
iRed
Foxes
cap
a record-breaking,
history-making
season with
their
first trip
to
th,e
Natio11al
Invitation Tournament.
Ma1
1
ist at 50
011
tile golde11
a11niversary
of
the
gra11ti11g
of
the Marist College
charter, a
look
back
at
Marist's history.
COVER
5
TORY
16
24
.
.
.
.
.
. .
.
.
.........
.

••••••••••••

•••••
The
Dawn
of the Digital
Library
111
partnership with
a
select
group
of institutions worldwide, Marist is building a
world-class
library
for
the 21st
century
that promises to become a 11atio11al
model
for the integratio11
of
network technology in al/ library Junctions and services.
Mari:;t
f acuity are
in
the vanguard
i11
showing
how
this
venture can
invigorate
the teaching
and learning process.
In R:are
Form
Rare documents
on
the environment,
Lowell Thomas and Hudson Valley history
are
among the valuable
materials
in
the Marist Library's special
collections,
which will
remain
accessible
alongside
the College's
new digital library.
DEPARTMENTS
2
...................

Breaking
New
Ground
14
Alumni
Profile

There's
No
Place Like a Home Page

CAUSE
and Effect
Free-lance documentary
film maker
Janet Graham has
combined
two
of
her greatest passions,
children
and
film making, in
a
recent project,
"The
Orphan Trains."

Marist Reaches
Summit

VIP Encounter

Pho,to Opportunity

Marist Poll Goes Coast to Coast

Guest Appearance

Colleges Tap Marist VPs

Fun,d Marks 10th Year

Rather Honored

Corporate Prophet

Dressed to Thri
II

Spre:ading
the U.S.
News
2 7
Campus
Lile

Marist Family Tree

Everything's Coming Up
Roses
for
Marist's Music Program
Executlive Editor:
Leslie
Bates
Vice
President
for College Advancement:
Sbaileen
Kopec
Chief College
Relations
Officer:
Timmian Massie
Art Director:
Rlcbard
Deon
Cover:
Composite
of
a
pboto by
Don Hamerman
and
a
NASA
image.
Contributing Photographers:
Lar,y Abrams,
Howard
Dratch,
Peter
Finger, Mallbew Gillis,
Don Hamerman,
Timmicm
Massie,
Tom Taft,Jr.
Marlst
!Magazine
is publisbed by Marist College, Office
of College
Advancement,
Po11g/Jkeepsie,
NY
1260/,
(914)
575-3000,
ext. 2412. E-mail: editor@marista.marist.edu
World \Vide Web: <b1tp://www.marlst.ed11>
















Guests
at the groundbreaking
for eirpanslon
of the
McCann
Center Included
(front row,
left to right) Marist TruslH Jim Barnes, Red Fox Club President
Tony
Antenucci, Bro. Paul Ambrose,
FMS, Mccann
Foundation
President
Jack Gartland, President
Dennis
Murray, McCann
Foundation
TrustH
Richard
Corbally,
Tony and
Mary Ellen
Kondysar,
Athletics
Director
Tim
Murray,
and (background)
more than 60 student athletes.
Breaking
New
Ground
P
resident Oenms
J.
Murray and several
distinguished
guests broke ground this
past spring for a major expansion and
renovation of Manst's James J. McCann
Recreation Center. Guests who wielded cer-
emonial gold shovels included
John].
Gartland
Jr., James
Barnes '68,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Anthony
Kondysar
and
Tony
Antenucci.
Approximately 60 student athletes also
attended the ceremony. Featured speakers
were Stacey Dengler, center for
Marist
women's
basketball team and co-chair of the Athletics
Director's Captains Council, Athletics Direc-
tor
Tim
Murray and
Mr.
Gartland, who heads
the McCann
Foundation. The
foundation,
which supported
the
original construction of
the facility 20 years ago, provided a leader-
ship gift of
$1
million for the expansion.
Ante:nucc1
1s president of
the Red
Fox
Club,
which
has
pledged
$75,000
for
the
project.
Mr.
and
Mrs. Anthony Kondysar
have
made a gift of $50,000. Tony is a member of
the Class of 1969, and he and Mary Ellen are
longtim1!
supporters of the Red Foxes.
Trustee Jim Barnes
'68
has
also
joined
the
McCann
project
with
a
$10,000
pledge.
In
addition, the Class
There's
No
Place Like
a
Horne Page
M
anst has a new, improved presence in cyberspace.
The
College has ma mt a med a site
on the
World
Wide
Web
for a few years, but us enhanced
Web
site now
provides
more
than
200
pages
of information on
Manst and the Hudson Valley.
Prospective freshmen and
graduate
students
can
find
information
about the College
and will soon be able
to
apply onlme.
Results
of
the latest Mansi Poll
or
Manst Bureau
of Economic Research report are
available
at the
chck
of a mouse. Virtual visuors can also
connect
wuh
the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Library or Eleanor
Roosevelt's
home
at
Val-
Kill
through
Manst's
site.
Alumni
can learn
about
events such
as Homecc[ming
and
class reunions or
can
contact their chapter representative.
Many
current
students have home pages, and
several faculty members have
servers
that highlight their
own
research or provide lmks
to other valuable
sites.
Developed and mamtamed by
Marist
faculty, staff, and students,
the
sue
1s
a work-
in-progress. Visitors
can
explore Marist's
site at
<http://www.marist.edu>.
of 1966 has pledged up to $25,000.
When completed m the fall of 1996, the
McCann Center will offer 20,000 additional
square feet
of
space including a
weight train-
ing center, a cardiovascular center,
a multi-
purpose gym, an additional
locker
area, a
student lounge, and a
Hall
of Fame room. A
makeover for the entrance will feature
a plaza
and an attractive facade.
CA
USE
and Effect
M
arist
has
been
recognized
as one
of the
top
four
colleges
and
universities in
America for
its
effective
use
of information
technology. The designation was made by
CAUSE, the assoc1at1on for managing and
using information resources in higher
educa-
tion.
Marist
was named runner-up to top
win-
ner Cornell University and co-honoree
with
Stanford and Duquesne univers1t1es.
The CAUSE awards
recognize
exemplary
cam
pus-wide net work planning, management
and accessibility, and effective
use
of
the
net-
work to enhance teaching, learmng,
research,
adm1mstration and community service.
More mformat1on
on
Marist
and Its
CAUSE
award is available on
the Marist Web site at
<http://www.marist.edu>.
Manse
Magazine




















································❖································
Marist Reaches
Summit
A
bout 50 students and staff members
as-
sisted
White House
staff during the
historic meeting between
President
Bill
Clinton
and
Russian President Boris Yeltsin this
past
fall at the
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Home and
Library
in Hyde Park.
Marist
also served as an
"extension" of
the White
House for the
meeting.
River,
and
1rhe
placing of
0owers
on
the
graves
of FDR and Eleanor
Roosevelt
in the Rose
Garden. Marist
media
were also represented
by students from
The
Circle, WMCR and
MCTV.
President Clinton
and President Yeltsin
shook hands with each
'
of the participating
Marist
students and fac-
ulty members. Media
covering
the
event inter-
viewed
President
Dennis
Murray, Marist
staff
members,
and students
about
the
College's
in-
volvement with the sum-
mit
and connection
to
the
FDR
Library.
At the
summit site,
Marist
students and staff
members helped with
the
logistics
of
the
Oct.
23
meeting, building plat-
forms
for
the media, set-
ting up risers for photog-
raphers,
planting
guide-
postsand
directional
signs,
hanging bunting outside
the FDR
Home
and guid-
ing
the 400
members
of
the international
press
corps
who descended
on
Hyde Park
for the four-
hour
meeting.
Senior
Rebecca
Bowes
(shaking
hands)
A few days prior
to
the
event, the White
House
communications
office set up the summit's
"command
center" on
the
third floor
ofMarist'sStu-
dent Center. On the day
of
the
summit, the Per-
forming
Arts Room
be-
was
one of
50 Marist
students
anti staff
members
who
met
President
Bill
c:linton
Marist
students were
granted access to each of
the
venues for
the
sum-
mit. Students saw
the
ar-
and
Russian
President
Boris
Yelbin
in Hyde Park, New
York.
rival and
departure
of the
two
presidents,
their
conversation on the south
lawn
as
they
viewed
the
autumnal beauty of the Hudson
Photo Opportunity
M
arist was extended a special
invitation
to
attend a private reception honoring
the Dalai Lama in Washington, D.C.
Marist
received the honor after the In-
ternational Campaign for Tibet
learned
of
the College's relationship with the late
broadcaster and explorer Lowell Thomas,
who visited
Tibet
in
1949
with his son,
Lowell.Jr. Among the items
included
in
the
Lowell Thomas Collection at Marist are
photographs from
that
trip. The Thomases
were the seventh and eighth Americans
allowed
into
Tibet and the
last
Americans
to see the country before the Chinese Com-
munist invasion of
1950.
President and Mrs. Dennis
J.
Murray,
Vice President for College Advancement
Shaileen Kopec and Chief College Rela-
tions Officer Tim Massie attended
the
re-
ception in honor of the Dalai Lama's 60th
birthday, which was hosted
by
Mr. and
Mrs.
Harrison
Ford. Murray presented the
Tibetan
spiritual leader with reprints of
40
of the photographs taken by the Thomases.
Marist Magazine
came
the
White House
switchboaird, while rooms 348 and 348A
handled all secure
telecommunications
issues
affecting national security and the president.
Marist Prusident
Dennis
Murray, right,
presents
rare photo1s
from the Lowell
Thomas
Collection
to
the Dalal L ma at
a
Washington,
D.C., reception.
The ~riurrays
were presented with prayer
stoles by- the Dalai Lama
as
a token of
gratitude for the gift of the photos. Actor
Richard
(;ere
was also honored for his work
on behalfofthe International Campaign for
VIP Encounter
Thomas Schwab
(far
left) and Lark Marie
I
Anton (second
from left) were among a
group
of
15
Marlst students
who met House
Speaker Newt Gingrich
(far right) and Con-
gresswoman
from New York Sue Kelly at
a
news
conference
in
Fishkill, N.Y., this past
spring.
The
students assisted
members
of
the media at the event. Students also n;et
Rep. Kelly
earlier
in the
semester
when
she
addressed
an
Introduction
to Political Sci-
ence class
at Marist.
(Left to right) Actor Richard
Gere talks with
Marilyn and Dennis
Murray at the party for the
Dalai Lama, the Tibetan
spiritual
leader.
Tibet.
The
Dalai Lama,
in
exile
in
India
since 1959, was visiting four
U.S.
cities to
draw attention to human
rights
abuses by
the Chinese in Tibet and
to
gain support for
the
liberation
of his homeland.




















Guest Appearance
O
ne
of
the
many guest speakers
to
ad-
dress
Marist
students
over the past aca-
demic
year was
the Hon. Geraldine Ferraro,
U.S.
Ambassador
to the U.N. Commission
on
Human Rights
and co-host of the CNN-TV
program "Crossfire." Ferraro's lecture
fo.
cused on
women's
rights and
the
U.N.
Inter-
national Conference
on Women in Beijing
she
attended in September 199S. Ferraro met
with
a
number
of students during
her
visit.
Mark
Sullivan
Marc
vanderHeyden
Colleges Tap
Marist VPs
T
wo vice presidents
at
Marist
have
become
presidents at
other colleges.
Mark
Sullivan has
been
appointed
the
eighth president of
the College
of
Saint
Rose
in
Albany,
New
York.
He was formerly execu-
tive vice president
at Marist.
Marc
vanderHeyden has
been
named
the
15th
president of Saint Michael's College
in
Colchester, Vermont. He was
previously
Marist's vice president of
academic
affairs.
Marist
President
Dennis Murray
says
both
individuals have
made
significant contribu-
tions
to
the
Marist
and Hudson Valley
com-
munities. He
also noted that
Marist
can
take
pride in the
appointments.
"Successful
leaders do
not develop
in a
vacuum;
theirtalents
and
capabilities
are nour-
ished
in
successful organizations. It
is
not
surprising that other
institutions have
turned
to Marist to
find their
future leaders."
4
··❖··
Mari.st Poll Goes Coast
to
Coast
kets represent approximately
35
percent of
the
national
TV
audi-
ence and
include
New
York
City, LosAngeles,
Philadelphia,
San
Francisco
and Baltimore.
Students
tape MIPO Directors Lee Miringoff and Barbara Carvalho in
Directors Dr.
Lee Miringoff
and
Dr.
Barbara
Carvalho
launched
the
video
news ser-
vice in
late 1995,
offering
poll
results
by videotape or satellite
downlink.
The videos show
Miringoff
and Carvalho analyz-
ing
results of
MIPO's
national
polls
on timely
topics. Topics
covered
in
the
latest
package
include
"Election '96," "Money
Troubles,"
"Are
our Schools
Cheating our
Kids?"
"The
Sum-
mer Olympics," and
"Summer
IMarist's Lowell
Thomas
Communications
Center.
T
he
Marist Poll may soon
become
a
house-
hold word.
The Marist Institute
for
Public
Opinion (MIPO) has begun making its poll
results available on video
to
TV stations across
America.
MIPO, known for
its
polls
on everything
from elections
to the
economy to social
trends,
distribut1:d
a recent video package to
44 tele-
vision markets around
the
nation.
The
mar-
Fund Marks
10th Year
T
he
Software Engineering
Re-
seMch
Fund
is
marking
its 10th
anniversary as
a unique resource
for
Marist
faculty and students in
the d1ivision
of computer science
and mathematics.
Vacations."
MIPO, which
conducts surveys
as
a learn-
ing experience
for
Marist students and
as a
public service, has built
a
solid reputation
for
accurate and
independent
local,
state and
national
polls. Each semester
more
than
100
students are
involved in MIPO's polls.
Newsday
has called the Marist
Poll
"one
of the most
widely respected surveys ... and a key
player
in
shaping news coverage for
a decade."
Over
the past
decade
the
endowed
fund
made
possible
the
annual Dr.
William
Cadden Com-
puter Scientist Lecture
Series,
which
brought
distinguished
scholars to
the
campus for
public
lectures and
roundtables.
SERF
has
also
supported
the Dr. William
Above,
computer
science faculty members
talk with Mrs.
Valerie Cadden (fat right) In the reading room at Marlst
named In memory
of her late husband,
Dr.
William
Cadd1m Achievement Award in
Cadden. Mrs. Cadden supports
the Software Engineering
Computer Science,
made
to
a
Research
Fund established
by her husband in 1986. SERF
stude1~t
who
shows excellence
in
acade:mic
and
extracurricular
activities
related
to the computer
science major.
In addition the
fund
provides assistance
for
faculty
research and scholarship.
provided
assistance
to recent research projects by Dr.
Shang Guo (left) and Dr. Stuart Greenfield (second from
right), joined here by faculty colleague Roger Norton.
SERF
was started
in
1986 with an
initial
contribution
from the
late Dr. Wil-
liam
Cadden and
is
currently supported
by his wife, Valerie.
Dr.
Cadden came
to
Marist in
1984
as
the
Dr.
Linus Richard
Foy Chair in Computer Science after
more
than
25 years with the
IBM
Corporation.
Marist Magazine































································❖··
Rather
Honored
V
eter.m CBS news anchor Dan Rather
has received the I 996 Manst
College
Lowell Thomas Award macer-
emony at
the
New York City's
Union League Club.
Rather has been anchor and
managmgednorof"CBS Evening
News" for 15 years.
ported
on
everything from the
quest
for
peace in
St>uth
Africa and the Middle
East 10 the wars m Vietnam,

Afghanistan,
the Persian Gulf
and Yugoslavia.
Rather has won virtually ev-
ery
award
in
journalism, from
numerous Emmy Awards 10
ci-
tations from cn11cal,
scholarly,
professional and
charitable
or-
ganiza11ons.
He recently received
the Peabody Award
for
his
"CBS
Reports" documentary,
"Viet-
nam: A Soldier Returns."
lie
Joins a distinguished
Since the start ofh1scareerin
1950,
he
has covered
the
world's
major news stories. He has inter-
viewed every U.S. president from
Dwight D. Eisenhower 10 Bill
Clinton and interna11onal lead-
ers
from
Nelson Mandela
to
Boris
Yeltsin. In 1990 he was the first
American
Joumahs1
to interview
Saddam Hussein after Iraq's in-
vasion of Kuwait.
CBS
news
anchor
g;roupof previous rec1p1ents:
Eric
Dan Rather
5,evareid, Walter
Cronkite,
Howard K. Sm11h, Douglas
Edwards, David Brinkley, Harry Reasoner,
John Chane.ell
or, Barbara
Walters,
Charles
Kuralt, Fred W Friendly, Don Hewill,
Dallas Townsend, ThomasJ Watson.Jr.,
Diane
Sawyer
and Tom Brokaw.
I
le
worked around the clock to
keep
the American people informed after the
assassma11on
of President John F Kennedy
on Nov
22,
1963 m Dallas. He has re-
Michael R.
Bloomberg
Corporate
Prophet
M
ichael R. Bloomberg, the interna11onally
renowned
entrepreneur
who
founded
the Bloomberg
Financial
Markets
empire, l0ld .
the
Maris1
College Class of 1996
that
the keys
10 success are hard work and ethics.
The 50th-commencement speaker also
told
the
806 undergraduate and 154 graduate
degree
recipients to
keep things
in
perspec-
tive. "Your family, your country, your reli-
gion, your friends: those are much more im-
portant than any material advancement that
you might gam."
Bloomberg drew applause
when
he said
that
America is
the
land
of opportunity.
"It
may not be perfect ... but just
remember,
when people vote with their feet they always
come
to
Arnenca. They never leave it."
Marist President Dennis
J.
Murray pre-
sented an honorary
DoclOr
of Business
Ad-
minis1ratio1n
degree to Bloomberg.
A Bostt>n na11ve, Bloomberg graduated
from the
Johns
Hopkins University in 1964
and received an
MBA from
the
I
larvard
Busi-
ness
Schooll in 1966.
After a sunt at Salomon Brothers in
Man-
hauan, he founded Bloomberg Financial Mar-
kets m 1981, creating the premier informa-
tion
and analysis system on Wall Street. His
corporation
provides multimedia,
analytical,
and news services
to
more
than
58,000 spe-
cially designed terminals in companies around
the world.
Bloomb,erg
Financial
Markets
also
encom-
passes an
all-news radio station;
"Bloomberg
Business News," which airs on public 1elevi-
s10n; Bloomberg
lnforma11on
Television, a
d1rec1 broadcast
1elev1s1on channel;
"Bloomberg Small Business" and
"Bloomberg
Personal
TV,"
nationally
syndicated
TV
news
magazines; Bloomberg
Personal
Online, a
World Wide Web site; Bloomberg and
Bloomberg
Personal
magazines; and two book
Imes, the Bloomberg Personal Bookshelf and
the
Bloomberg Professional Library.
Murray
also gave honorary Doctor of
Hu-
mane Leuers degrees lO Bro. Augustine
J.
Landry, FMS, and Bro. Patrick F. Tyrrell,
FMS. two graduates of the College who went
on to serve as missionaries and educational
leaders
in Japan for more
than
30 years.
Dressed to Thrill
~
More
than
750 guests enJoyed
the
10th annual Silver Needle
Awards and Fashion Show produced
by the
Fashion
Program at
Marist
this
past May.
The
event, held at the
IBM Mid-Hudson
Valley Con-
ference Center in
Poughkeepsie,
showcased collec11ons
designed
by
10 Maris1
seniors and mod-
eled by students.
More
than
125
students from a variety of disci-
plines worked behtnd the
Sandra
Biro's
vinyl dress was
modeled
at the 10th annual
Silver
Needle Awards
and
Fashion
Show.
Each senior worked
with
a designer
from the
New
York
fashion indus-
try in creating the cloth-
mg
lines. The designers
were among those at-
tending
the
show.
"The
Marist
College
fashion program enJoys a respected reputa-
tion and is recognized for the quality of its
graduates and
thetr
work," says Elizabeth
Csordas, director of
the
fashion program.
Spreading the
U.S.
News
M
aris11s
ranked
among
the
top Iler of
northern
colleges
and universn1es
in U.S. News and World Report's
Amencci's Best
College:;
guide
for
the
second s11aight
year.
The
College 1s ranked
22nd
in aca-
demic reputation
out of
146
colleges
m
its category
in the
1996
guide.





















reature
·······················❖··········
Guiding
Light
Jack Gartland's 40 years of dedicated
community service
have immeasurably
improved the
quality of lif1e
throughout the mid-Hudson
Valley.
F
or a man whom
the
local
newspa-
per
has called
the
most influential in the
county,
he is
not what
you expect
pursuit for the growth of
the
individual and for the
qual-
ity of the community."
John].
GartlandJr. greets
you himself in the reception
area
of the law firm where he
is senior partner, in the city
of Poughkeepsie where he has
practiced law
since 1946 and
where he was born. He
leads
you
into
a simple office on
the fifth floor above the
Bardavon Theatre. The view
An
active member
of
Mariist's
board of
trustees,
Jack Gartland
chairs the board's
Jack Gartland has made
certain that, in keeping with
McCann's wishes, education
remains a foundation prior-
ity. The foundation over the
years has made a great im-
pact on elementary, second-
ary, and higher education in
the mid-Hudson Valley.
Pro-
grams range from placing
computers in elementary
schools to the ambitious
project
currently
underway
for Our Lady of
Lourdes
High
School.
In
1996
the
McCann
Foundation made a $2
mil-
lion gift to help
refurbish
a
Buildings
and Grounds
com1mittee,
which oversaw
construction
of
the Student Center.
is not the
panorama
of river and mountains
you had pictured for
the
man who adminis-
ters the $30 million
McCann
Foundation, the
largest
benefactor
in Dutchess County. Yes,
you can see a piece of
the
Mid-Hudson Bridge
and
part
of a
mountain,
but they are blocked
for the most part by
other city buildings; this
is definitely not
the
penthouse-suite spectacle
you
had
imagined of the man
known
as the
leading
mover
and shaker in
the
area.
Gartland phones his receptionist and asks
her
to hold
all calls except those from his wife,
which
are "important," he smiles.
Interviewing Jack Gartland about his ex-
traordinary 40
years of community service
soon
proves
to
be
a difficult task. He isn't one
totalkabout
himself despite his
many
achieve-
ments. As president of the
McCann Founda-
tion
since 1969, he
has
overseen the contribu-
tion
of $33 million to area organizations,
churches and schools. He has guided the
foundation in providing everything
from
high-
profile athletic facilities such as golf courses,
baseball fields
and skating rinks named
McCann
to
less-glamorous
but critical basics
like
new stoves
for the Lunch Box
program at
St. Paul's Episcopal Church and a copy ma-
chine for
Milton
Engine Company No.
1.
Apart from his foundation stewardship,
Gartland has
made
an immense
impact
on
the
city of Poughkeepsie as a community leader in
his
own
right.
BY LESLIE
BATES
Bulja.ck Gartland steers all talk about his
good deeds away from himself and instead
toward the problems that had to be solved.
For
instance, the McCann Foundation has
supported a number of recreational facilities
such as the swimming pool and athletic center
al Marist College and the McCann Ice Arena
downtown. Why a pool or skating rink? Be-
cause the City of Poughkeepsie,
he says, sought
them for
:its
youth.
The swimming pool in Marist's James
J.
McCann
Recreation
Center, for example, was
built in
1976
because existing pools at the
YMCA
and YWCA
could not accommodate all
those who wanted to swim. Children who
swam competitively were arriving before sun-
rise at
the Y
pools because those were the only
available l!imes. "It was hard on
the
parents,"
Gartland says simply. Now both city and
county competitive swimmers use
the
McCann
pool, as do Marist students.
The foundation has responded
this
way to
needs expressed by the community ever since
1969,
wh1:n
James].
McCann,
a Poughkeepsie
native and proprietor of
a
feed and grain store
who quie:tly
made a
fortune in
the
stock
market, passed
away. He
left an estate of $17
million and his attorney, Jack Gartland, in
charge of it.
McCa nn had envisioned a charitable foun-
dation that would serve the community. Al-
though he did not give Gartland specific di-
rections f.or use of the funds, he did have a
strong bel.ief that education was
"an
essential
former campus-like IBM site that will become
the high school's new home. The foundation
also provides scholarships for
local
students
to attend Marist, Dutchess Community Col-
lege, Vassar College, and Bard College.
Gartland knows from watching his own
eight
children
grow up how important higher
education has become.
"A
college education
today is no different from a high school edu-
cation 50 or 60 years ago," he says. He notes
that in his grandparents' day, a grade-school
education was sufficient, whereas for his par-
ents it was high school, and for his generation,
college. He himself, after graduating from
Poughkeepsie High School, earned a B.A.
from Georgetown University and
law
degrees
from Fordham University and St.
John's
Uni-
versity. For his children, he adds, a graduate
degree has been the standard; two of
them
hold Ph.D.'s, two have master's degrees, and
one is an attorney.
Marist is a prime example of the commit-
ment the McCann Foundation has made to
supporting education.
Altogether
the
College has received al-
most $9 million from
the
foundation,
includ-
ing $60,000 in scholarships in 1996 and a $1
million grant announced in 1995 to fund
expansion and renovation of the James
J.
McCann Recreation Center.
The
center serves
more than 3,000 Marist students who partici-
pate in sports at the intercollegiate,
intramu-
ral,
and recreational
level.
As
the
home of
Marist College Division I basketball it has
become one of the best-known facilities in the
Marist Magazine















region and is a popular venue for community
athletic, entertainment, and cultural events.
The McCann Baseball Field and the North
Athletic Fields are also first-class facilities the
foundation made available for Marist stu-
dents. The Lowell Thomas Communications
Center received a significant grant from
the
foundation toward its completion. The
Gartland Commons Garden Apartments,
named for Jack Gartland and his wife,
Catherine, allowed
Marist to
ex-
pand its
residential
options for stu-
dents.
The
foundation has also
funded a number of academic en-
deavors at Marist, including the Dr.
Linus Richard Foy Chair in Com-
puter Science.
A McCann Foundation annual
report explains why the organiza-
tion
has supported Marist over the
years. "We believe the foundation's
foresight in supporting the devel-
opment of Marist College will
ben-
efit the
region many
times over in
the short- and long-term
revitaliza-
tion of the Hudson Valley economy
and the continuing enhancement of
its quality of life."
Gartland's strong
relationship
with Marist goes
back to
1956. It
was
then that
Bro. Paul Ambrose,
president of Marist College at the
time, asked Gartland, a fellow mem-
ber of the board of Saint Francis
Hospital in Poughkeepsie, for ad-
vice on admitting lay students to
the College. At the time Marist edu-
cated only men who were training
to become Marist Brothers. That
year Gartland became the first
lay-
person invited to serve on Marist's
board of
trustees.
Gartland has
worked tirelessly on Marist's behalf
ever since.
Marist's president, Dennis
J.
OveT a p,eriod of
more
than two decades, Jack
Gartland has been recognized
with the region's most prestigious awards for his contributions
in the
areas
of humanitarianism, citizenship and community service.
heartfelt thanks for
his
commitment to the
College. lln the
late 1980s
students who had
received McCann scholarships held a lun-
cheon to present Gartland, an avid golfer,
with a green jacket copied from that bestowed
and Mount Carmel churches, St. Peter's
Church and Cemetery, and the
Hudson
Val-
ley Philharmonic, to name
just
a few. The
foundation's Community Computer Grant
Project, a partnership with Marist, has pro-
vided
more
than 50 schools and
nonprofits with computers and tech-
nical expertise
to
streamline admin-
istrative functions and lower oper-
ating costs.
Although the McCann Founda-
tion has made a powerful impact on
the quality of life in
Dutchess
County, unquestionably
Jack
Gartland has been a significant in-
nuence as a community leader and
volunteer in his own right.
"He is a dedicated
person by
nature, completely outside of
the
McCann Foundation," says Bro.
Paul.
Gartland's extensive volunteer
activities have included serving as a
trustee
of Saint Francis Hospital for
17 years, and chairman of its board
for two years; a
trustee
of Astor
Home in Rhinebeck for 29 years;
and a board
member
of St. Mary's
Church and the Area Fund of
Dutchess County. He also served
the Archdiocese of New York as a
member of the Board of Catholic
Education and a trustee of Catholic
Charities. Currently he
is
a board
member of the Saint
Francis Health
Care Foundation as well as a co-
trustee of the Cunneen-Hackett
Foundation and a member of the
board of directors of the Franklin
and Eleanor Roosevelt
Institute.
Murray,
says the impact of
Jack
Gartland's work has been nothing
short of phenomenal. "For more
than
four decades
Jack
Gartland has
been
a guiding
light
at Marist, per-
sonally overseeing
the
College's
emergence from a small religious
Marist President
De,~nls
Murray
(far
left)
and
President Emeritus
Bro.
Over a period of
more than two
decades
Jack
Gartland has been rec-
ognized with the
region's
most pres-
tigious
awards for his contributions
in the
areas of humanitarianism,
citizenship, and community service.
Paul Ambrose,
FMS
llcenter)
have
worked closely with
Jack Gartland in
training school to a distinctive lib-
eral arts college," says
Murray.
"More
than
any
other volunteer associated with Marist,
Jack
Gartland has spearheaded significant
institu-
tional change.
He
has been an
integral
part of
every major College decision, fostering the
admission of lay students in
1957
and of
women in 1968. Physically and academically,
Marist has been significantly shaped by Jack
Gartland's efforts." Gartland served as the
chairman of Marist's board of
trustees
from
1971
to 1973 and continues as a very active
trustee, particularly in chairing the board's
Buildings and Grounds comminee at weekly
meetings.
Students especially appreciate the devo-
tion Gartland shows
to Marist.
The Class of
1977 dedicated
its
yearbook to him with a
Marist
Magazine
shapin1:
Marist
physically
and academically.
on
the
wi1nner of the prestigious Masters golf
tournament held in Augusta, Georgia, each
spring. The gift of the jacket is one of his most
cherished memories of his association with
Marist. His
other fondest memories are re-
ceiving an honorary Doctor of Humane
Let-
ters from Marist
in 1980,
and
the
ceremony
naming thte townhouses
and
athletic fields on
the
north end of the campus
in
honor of him
and his wife.
Under Gartland's leadership, the McCann
Foundation has supported a wide range of
area
institutions
including
the
McCann-Caven
golf courses,
the
Mid-Hudson Civic Center,
the Culinary
Institute
of America, Saint Francis
Hospital,
Vassar Brothers Hospital,
the
Poughkeepsie Catholic Center, Saint Mary's
But he is
not
one
to
seek the spot-
light.
Whether
the
community is
tackling
an issue or developing an asset, Jack
Gartland is most likely to
be
found behind
the
scenes, contributing his extraordinary ability
to bring
people and resources together.
In the end,Jack Gartland's 40-year record
of community service speaks for itself. It shows
a belief in the values of family, church, educa-
tion, and community, and in
the
idea
that
making
these institutions strong will enhance
not only
the
lives of
individuals but
the vital-
ity of the region.
"Jack Gartland
is
part of a select group of
men and women whose individual deeds per-
manently and
powerfully
enrich
the lives
of
many," says
Dennis Murray.
"He has commit-
ted
his life
to
making his community a better
place, now and
in
the
future."























Halure
···············❖···················
A Hudson River Heritage
Poughkeepsie
once
reigned
as
the
"Rowing
Capital" of the world. Marist College is
carrying
on this Hudson River tradition.
Collegiate competitive
rowing
Is
a tradition that dates
to 1829. Above, Marist
College
crew members
practice
on
a
typical
Hudson
River
morning.
T
he
signal for
the
start was
given
by
a cannon on
the
railroad
bridge The crews were
off,
their
boats soaring down the river all
in a
row.
Bands played, banners waved,
and
poli-
ticians were shaking hands and kissing
babies. Thousands lined the
shores of
the
Hudson River
to
cheer
their
teams
to
victory. It was the early 1900s,
and
the Intercollegiate Rowing Association
regatta,
the most famous
rowing
event in
the world, was in town.
Fifty
years earlier
the racing
scene
had
not
been
so civilized.
Thousands
of gamblers,
thieves and gang members
inundated
Poughkeepsie for rowing races between
crews
of professional oarsmen.
Women and chil-
dren
stayed
behind
closed
doors,
and
fright-
ened merchants
boarded
up their stores. Bar-
keeps
cleared
their
shelves of glassware, but 1t
didn't
stop
fights from breaking
out between
supporters of rival
crews.
BY JOSHUA
GAYNOR
'96
The Hudson
has been home to some form
of
rowing for
more
than two
centuries. first
there were
Indians
in
canoes,
then rowing
races among the early Dutch seulers. A row-
ing
club
from Poughkeepsie
started
the
local
craze
in 183 7 when it sent a crew 10 Newburgh,
16
miles
down river,
for
the
first organized
regaua
held on
the
Hudson.
Back
then
clubs
had formed in many river
towns
and villages
in
the
East.
Teams
of oarsmen, such as the
Ward
brothers from
Cornwall
and
Newburgh's
Biglin Brothers, were sponsored by wealthy
men who
paid
for
boats, training,
and other
expenses.
The most notorious race of the day, the
American Championships,
100k
place
in
Poughkeepsie in July
1865.
Promoted
as
the
"race
of the century," the event
covered
a
S-
mile
c:ourse,
2.5
miles up
the
river
and
back.
The race
offered prize money
totaling
$6,000.
A
crowd of more than
20,000
lined the
riverbanks, and more than 10,000
people
wagered an
estimated
$100,000
on
the
race.
Tihe trouble
started when
the
Biglin Broth-
ers
defeated the
"Stranger" crew,
the
local
favorite, in what looked like a close race.
But
the Poughkeepsie
boat protested that
II
was
cut
o,ff at
the
finish.
To escape
the
angry
Stranger
fans, the referee and
judges
were
rushe:d
by
stagecoach
down Main
Street to the
Poughkeepsie
Hotel
to
rule
on the race.
As the officials entered the hotel,
"thugs
and
roughs,"
as
the
newspapers
of
the
time
described the crowd, barged in, nashing pis-
tols, kmves and clubs to inum1date the ref-
eree. The officials gave the race to the Biglin
Brothers
and barely escaped
with their lives.
The city was overtaken by
riots, drunken
disturbances
and numerous street fights dur-
ing
the days that followed.
Detectives
from
New York brought in to
keep the
peace
met
with lmle success, faced w11h not only the
drunk and
disorderly but hundreds
of pick-
pockets who surfaced from out of town for the
occasion.
Most of the rioting grew from fights
between
supporters
of the rival
crews. Bill
Stevens, the stroke of the Poughkeepsie boat,
got into a fistfight,
killing
Thomas DeMou, a
customer of a
downtown
saloon,
who had
accused Stevens of selling the race.
By 1895,
Poughkeepsie's history of
VJO·
lent
regauas was behind
it and
the
city
was
chosen to be the site of the inaugural
regatta
of
the
newly
formed
Intercollegiate
Rowing
Association.
The first crew races
between uni-
versmes date 10 1829
when
Oxford and Cam-
bridge raced
at
Henley. Yale
and
Harvard
inaugurated
their
rowing rivalry in 1852 at
Lake Winnepesaukee m New
Hampshire.
But
on June 24,
1895,
when
Columbia, Cornell,
and Pennsylvania became
the
first schools to
row the four-mile IRA race,
11
marked the start
of
the golden era of
what
one 194
7 sports
editor
called "the
greatest rowing classic in the
United States."
More than 30,000
spectators crowded
into Poughkeepsie by train to
watch
the race
that Friday
in 1895.
But
before
the rowing
could
begin, the wake from
a
spectator's
tug
boat sent Pennsylvania's shell crashing against
Manst Maga~1nc







the docks, damaging it beyond repair. The
Columbia and Cornell crews refused to row
without Pennsylvania, so officials postponed
the
race
until the following Monday, allowing
Pennsylvania to repair its shell.
Monday brought choppy
conditions
on
the river,
and Pennsylvania, the favored
crew,
swamped in the rough water halfway through
the
race. Columbia went on to defeat Cornell.
The celebration that followed
that
night drew
comparisons
in
papers of the day to the streets
of New Orleans during Mardi Gras.
Over the next 50 years, collegiate
crews
came from all over the country to take part in
what was considered the
"World
Series
of
Rowing."
More and more
teams
were drawn
to the race because it was so popular among
spectators, and because the Poughkeepsie
course
was considered
the
best straight 4-mile
stretch of water in the
country.
The IRA
race,
which
came
to be called the Poughkeepsie
Regatta, grew to include Wisconsin,
Georgetown, Syracuse, Navy, Stanford, Wash-
ington,
California, MIT, and Princeton.
For years a
rolling
grandstand of about 60
canvas-covered natcars, called the Observa-
tion
Train, operated along the west shore of
the Hudson, providing
the
best view of the
race only yards away as it followed the crews
down the course. Teams painted huge
school
tellers on
the
rock slabs of the west shore that
can still be seen
today.
Interruptions
of the race because of the
World War years
caused
most of the excite-
ment to disappear by the mid-l
940s.
The
shortening of the race to 2,000 meters
(ap-
proximately 1.25 miles) opened the field to
Marist
Magazine
other possible race
courses.
The Hudson's
unpredictable water conditions and the dis-
mantling of the Observation Train in World
War II further led to the departure of the IRA
from Poughkeepsie. In 1950 and 1951 the
regatta was held in Marietta, Ohio, and in
1952
at Onondaga Lake
in
Syracuse, where
it
was held •~ach
June
until 1994. In 1995 it
moved to
its
current
home on the Cooper
River in Camden, New Jersey.
Although 1949 was
the
last
time the IRA
took place
in
Poughkeepsie, the region's row-
ing fever n,~ver
died. One year later three local
public higlh schools offered crew for the first
time. Arlington, Poughkeepsie and Roosevelt
held
their
first Triangular regatta on the
Hudson on May 14, 1950, complete with
cheerleaders and a marching band, beginning
a longtime rivalry among the schools.
The ye:ar 1956 saw the high school na-
tional
championship held in Poughkeepsie.
More than 300 oarsmen competed on 52
crews
from 28 schools. Nationals were held
again
in
Poughkeepsie in 1964.
The ariea's high-school
rowing
programs
spawned at least one world-class rower. Pat
Manning, a.1985 graduate and four-year
rower
from Roose:velt
High School, stroked the men's
heavyweight
four to a silver medal in
the
1992
Summer Olympics in
Barcelona. Manning is
one of only a few athletes from Dutchess
County to have achieved Olympic status.
Marist College entered
the local rowing
scene in 1960 when Dr.
Linus
R. Foy, then the
College's president, developed an interest in
starting a rowing program. Marist needed
some
new extracurricular activities to satisfy
its
lay
population, and
crew
was
the
solution.
In 1960
Joe
Catanzaro became Marist's first
crew coach. The following year Marist raced
for
the first time,
and the
team
was on its way.
The Marist crew program reached one of
its highest
points
in the early
1970s,
under
Coach Bill Austin.
Immediately
after coming
on board
in
1968, Austin had hired Bill
Lenehan
to
coach
the freshman
rowers. To-
gether
they began
building what soon
became
one of the most respected small-college pro-
grams in
the
East.
In
1971
Austin coached his junior varsity
eight to a gold at the Head-of-the-Charles
Regatta in Boston. Austin says
they
not only
won the race over 32 other
boats
but also set
a record for
the
3-mile
race.
Among
the
schools
competing were Syracuse,
Yale, Rutgers, the
University of Massachusetts,
Harvard,
Georgetown, Columbia, Brown and
Rhode
Island.
In
the
spring of 1971, Austin added
a
varsity lightweight team to the growing pro-
gram. Soon after, a junior varsity
team
was
added as well.
The success stories continued when
the
1972 freshman
boat lost
only one of its 44
races,
posting
the best season ever
by
any
crew at
Marist. That
year
the freshman
squad
captured the President's Cup
Regatta
at home
on
the
Hudson and won the New England
Rowing
Championship
on
Lake
Quinsigamond in Worcester, Massachusetts.
The team
capped
a tremendous season when
it pulled away in the closing stages to win
the
national small school rowing championship
in
the Dad Vail Regatta on the Schuylkill River
in
Philadelphia.























Competitors
In
the
1947
Intercollegiate
Regatta
pass
under the
Poughkeepsie
Railroad Bridge.
A week
later the
freshmen received Marist's
only invitation to the IRA regatta. After an
absence of 23 years, Marist was able to bnng
a Poughkeepsie presence
to
the
IRA
races
once
again. Unfortunately,
the
freshman eight
had
to overcome many obstacles in their first
appearance at the national
championships.
MarisL
and five other crews had to battle
gusts up to
25
miles
per hour
and extremely
choppy conditions during the freshman race.
As a result, both the Manst and the Coast
Austin moved beyond
collegiate
rowing in
1977
when he was named to the U.S. Olympic
Rowmg Commlllee to prepare rowers for the
1980
Olympic Games m Moscow.
Todaiy,
under coach Scott Sanford, 80
students make up the Marist crew team.
filling
nine boats. Fifty are women, competing in a
varsny lightweight and heavyweight eight, a
junior
va.rsity
eight, and
two novice/freshman
eights. The men campaign a varsity heavy-
weight eight, lightweight and heavyweight
"Each
year the men's and women's team has achieved
competition
on a higher
level,"
says
Sanford, Marist's present head
coach. "We are
no longer building the
crew
program. We have
established
the program as a
contender
in the league."
Guard
Academy boats sank halfway through
the
course.
"With
the
combination of
being placed in
the
far outside lane and the stormy weather
conditions causing five-foot waves to come
crashing over the sides of the boat, our boat
flooded
until we
sank,"
Lenehan
says. "But
we
did
get our
picture in
Sports Illustrated
that
year because of it." Thanks to the Associated
Press
and
United
Press
International,
the photo
also
ended
up in
the
Boston
Globe,
the
Philadel-
phia Inquirer
and
the
Miami Herald.
Austin
encouraged
the organization of a
women's
program in the fall of 1974. The idea
developed after
a
large number of women
turned
out for Marist Crew
Camp
that
sum-
mer. When Austin retired
from coaching to
become
director of alumni affairs at Manst in
1976,
he had
built
the
crew program
from
11
students to a
team
of
three lightweight,
three
heavyweight and
two
women's
varsity boats.
four, and a novice/freshman eight.
Today
the
only collegiate crew regatta
rowed irn Poughkeepsie is
the
President's Cup.
Named in honor
of
former
Marist
College
President
Dr. Linus
R.
Foy, the event was first
held
in May
of 1963 with
Trinity
College
emerging as champion. The
following year,
Marist Director of
Athletics
Dr. Howard
Goldman established the last Saturday in April
as the permanent date for the race.
In the tradnion of
the race, Manst College
President
Dr. Dennis
Murray
presents a silver
cup to the school that scores the largest num-
ber of points. The cup 1s named for Herbert
J.
Haight,
president
of
the
Mid-Hudson School-
boy
Rowing Association
for
many
years and a
great contributor to scholastic and collegiate
rowing. A group of friends created the trophy
m honor of Haight following
his
death in
March
of
1969
and presented
it to Marist
College. Some of
the
most prestigious rowing
institutions in the East
have fought
for
the
Haight Trophy including
Navy, Army,
North-
eastern, Temple, Villanova, and Fordham.
Marist won the President's Cup for
the
fifth
consecutive year
in 1996,
capturing
both the
men's and women's titles and defeating eight
other schools.
Three
weeks later, the women's
lightweight varsity eight finished second in
the
Dad
Vail
Regatta.
"Each year
the men's and women's team
has achieved competition on a higher level,"
says Sanford,
Manst's
present head coach.
"We are no longer building
the
crew
program.
We
have established
the
program as a
con-
tender in the league."
Sanford sees a future for rowmg on
the
Hudson,
thanks to growing
interest among
area
adults who
enjoy
the sport as exercise,
ongoing rowing
programs at the local high
schools, the
Mid-Hudson Rowmg Associa-
tion,
Manst,
and Vassar College,
where
crew
will
move
up from
a club
to a varsity sport in
the
fall
of
1997.
"It
most likely won't be as popular as it
was back m the
IRA
days," says Sanford. "But
on
a smaller
scale,
the
local
rowing scene
still
has a
bright future
to
look forward
to." If
so,
n
will prove true the
words written by
a
nostalgic newspaper reporter back in
1939:
"Poughkeepsie
has
been,
is, and always will
be
a
crew-racing
Lown."

Joshua Gaynor
'96
majored in communications
with
a
concentration
in
public
relations.
He rowed
on
the Marist crew team for four years after
joining as a
novice
during his
freshman
year.
For more information on the
Marist
crew
team, please visit the Marist College
Crew
Home
Page
at
<http:llwww.academic.marist.edu/crew/
crew.him>.
Mansi Magazine

























reature
Marist Men's Basketball
Standing
Tall
The Red foxes cap a record-breaking, history-making
season
with their first trip to the National Invitation Tournament.
P
oughheepsie]oumal
sports writer
JW. Stewart called it a "dream
season." A
Journal
editorial
called it
"superb."
Even
the
New Yorh
Times
noticed
as
the Marist
men's bas-
ketball team got off to
its best
start ever.
By all accounts the 1995-96 season was
the best in Marist College history, capped by
the Red
Foxes'
first postseason appearance
since 1987 and their first
trip
to the National
Invitation
Tournament.
They began
by winning their first five
games. Led byseniorco-captainsAlan Tomidy,
Danny Basile and Kareem
Hill,
the
team
drew
a near-capacity crowd
to
theJamesj. McCann
Recreation Center for each game. As the suc-
cess of the
Red
Foxes continued, McCann
became an arena with standing room only.
Students arrived as much as
an
hour before
game
time
to get a seat.
Marist
basketball
was
the
hottest ticket
in
town, when
tickets
could
be
found.
The
Red
Foxes reeled off a nine-game
winning streak on
the
way to securing a
school-best, 22-win season. That victory pla-
teau
was the highest since the days of big man
Rik Smits, now
playing
with the
Indiana
Pac-
ers in the
NBA.
Except this time around, there
was a
new
big
man to
bolster
the
squad.
Center Tomidy, the
"Big
Boy
from
LeRoy,"
turned in the
most impressive season since his
recruitment four years earlier.
The6'1
l" player
became
the school's
fifth
all-time leading scorer
and second all-time
rebounder.
He
even won
a nomination for the Hagarty Award, given
annually
lo
the
top
player in
the
New York
metropolitan
area, and was named a first-
team All Northeast Conference (NEC) selec-
tion.
Tomidy's teammates
complemented him
with
numbers.
Forward Hill and guard Basile
turned in memorable performances in their
final
season as well. Basile,
the
nation's free-
throw
percentage
leader
two years ago, fin-
ished the season fourth all-time amongMarist's
scoring
leaders.
Hill, who had improved his
game tremendously over
the
years, was one of
BY JASON
FARACO
'96
Marist Magazine
The 1995:.96 men's basketball
team assembles
for a portrait by Marist's
signature
Red Fox logo
on
the
fieldlhouse
floor, where a
string of
winning
games culminated
in Marist's first trip to the NIT.
eight
parti.cipants
invited to
a national colle-
giate slam--dunk
competition held
at
Fordham
University in the Bronx
and
broadcast
on
ESPN, a
contest in
which he
took
fifth place.
Hill,
fifth
place on Marist's all-time
rebound-
ing
list, was voted to
the
second All-NEC
team.
Event he
New York Times noticed that
the
Red Foxes were on a roll. On the eve of the
NEC tournament, Page Bl 1 of the Feb. 23
Sports section
carried
a
quarter-page
story
complete with large
photo about
the
team's
impressive
efforts.
During his tenth season on the
sidelines
for Marist, Magarity himself reached several
coaching imilestones.
By preaching a tough
defensive :;tyle
and
patience on
the
offensive
end, he notched his 150th
career
win as
Marist
coa,ch
as well
as
his 200th
all-time
win.
With
all
the pieces in place, Marist was
ready
to
make
a run
at not only
the Northeast
Conference
crown
but the
coveted
place
in
the NCAA tournament guaranteed to
the NEC
victor. Bui:
the
Marist men suffered a heart-
breaking,
last-minute loss
when
evemual
champion Monmouth beat them 57-56 m the
semifinals of the 1996 NEC tournament.
While Monmouth advanced, Marist hoped
for a
better end
lo
the
season: its first-ever
bid
to
the
National
Invitation Tournament.
The
call came
48 hours before the
start of the NIT.
Although
the
Red Foxes ultimately
lost
to
the
University of Rhode Island
82-77 in South
Kingstown, Magarity
called it
the
best game
he had seen
his team
play
all season. Sports
writers praised Marist,
an 11-point underdog,
for hanging
tough
with
the
Rams.
The historic
NIT appearance was a
more
fitting conclusion
for a
team
that
had
accom-
plished
so
much. The Red
Foxes set a
scho?I
record for wins at 22-7.
They were
14-4
m
regular-season NEC
play to
earn a second-
place
finish
in the conference.
They
were
13-
2 at home. Dave Magarity
was named District
II Coach
of
the Year by the
National
Associa-
tion of Basketball
Coaches, one of only 15
coaches
in
the nation to
receive
the
honor.
In
an editorial, the
Poughkeepsie
Journal
summed
it up when it
described
Marist as a
team
reOecting old-fashioned athletic virtues:
talent desire
and unselfishness. "This
is not
a
team
~vith one
dominating
player
and
a sup-
porting
cast.
It
is a
team in the
classic sense-
student athletes of complementary skills and
a
collective
will to
win."

Jason
Farago
'96,
a communications
major,
cov-
ered sports as assistant sports editor
for
Marist's
student
newspaper, The
Circle,
and for the
College's
television station,
MCTV.
11
























realure
.......................
·········❖·
M[arist
at
5
0
On the
golden
anniversary of the
grantimg
of the Marist College
charter, a look back at Marist's
history.
St. Ann's Hermitage,
where Marist began.
1905
Maris!
Brothers
purchased
estate
on
the
Hudson
River
they renamed
St. Ann's
Hermitage
which
became
a school
for
aspiring
Brothers.
1929
State of
New
York autho-
rizes Maris!
Normal
Train-
ing
School
to
grant
Bach-
elor
of
Arts
degrees
in
conjunction
with Fordham
University.
1943
Bro.
Paul
Ambrose Fontaine,
FMS
appointed
president
of
Marian
College.
1946
Marian
College
becomes
a
chartered
four-year
college,
at which
the
mission
re-
mains
the
training
of
Maris!
Brothers
as teachers.
First lay teacher,
Dr. John
Schroeder,
is
hired.
Enrollment:
31
Operating
budget:
$50,000
Alumni:
O
1947
First graduating
class of four
Maris!
Brothers.
Old gym completed.
1950
Enrollment:
66
Operating
budget:
$150,000
Alumni:
29
Marist Brothers
work on the
roof of
Donnelly
Hall.
12
1954
Our Lady of Wisdom Chapel
dedicated
during
Interna-
tional Marian
Year
1954.
1956
Fontaine
Hall built.
·
First lay
Board
of Advisors
created.
John
J. Gartland,
Jr. appointed
president.
1957
First lay
students,
12
men,
admitted.
Adrian
Hall
constructed.
1958
Linus R. Foy becomes
presi-
dent
at age 28,
the
young-
est college
president
in the
United
States.
Theatre
Guild, the first
student
club on
campus,
formed.
1958-1962
Donnelly
Hall
constructed.
1959
All
lay-male
Evening
Division
introduced
with
167
stu-
dents.
Dr. John Schroeder
serves
as dean.
1960
Marian
College
becomes
Maris!
College.
Enrollment:
250
Operating
budget:
$500,000
Alumni:
256
1961-1962
Sheahan
Hall
built.
1963
Leo Hall
built.
Byrne
Residence
con-
structed.
William Martin
Boathouse
built.
Maris!
Abroad
Program
started by Bro. Joseph
Belanger,
FMS.
Marist
in
the 1960s.
1964
First four
lay
people
are
appointed
to Board
of
Trustees.
1965
Champagnat
Hall and
Campus
Center
open.
1966
Women
admitted
to
Evening
Division.
1967
College's
first mainframe
computer
installed
in
Adrian
Hall.
1968
Leonidoff
Field, the
College's
first major
athletic
field,
dedicated.
Gregory
House
and Benoit
House
built.
Women
admitted
to Day
Division.
1969
First women live
on campus,
in Leo and
Sheahan
Halls.
Mccann
Foundation
Schol-
arships introduced
to
help
Hudson
Valley
students
finance
their education.
Children's
Theatre
founded.
Mrs. Dorothy
Willis was one of the first two women
to receive
degrees
from Marist. Eight of her 10 children looked on as
she graduated
in 1968.
Maris!
Magazine






















································❖
••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••
1970
1982
Enrollment: 1,100
Master's
in computer
Operating
budget:
science/software
develop-
$3,828,000
ment
program
introduced.
Alumni:
2,221
1983
1972
Maris!
athletic
programs,
First
graduate
programs
except
football, are el-
introduced:
M.B.A.
and
evated
to Division
I status.
M.A.
in community
psy-
New townhouses
for
chology.
upperclass
students
open
on
north
campus.
1973
Maris!
receives
$4 million
Title
Ill Grant.
Communications
major
Fishkill,
N.Y.,
Extension
introduced.
Center
opens.
1974
Old gym
becomes
Marian
residence
hall
for.fresh-
Adult Education
programs
men.
expand
with
first
off-
Maris!
College
Lowell
campus
extension
center.
Thomas
Award estab-
lished.
1975
1984
Maris! College
Community
Service
program
begins.
The College
receives
$2.5
1976-1977
million in equipment
and
$2 million
in
software
from
IBM to expand
academic
James
J.
Mccann Recre-
and administrative
uses of
ation Center
constructed.
computers
on campus.
Maris! acquires
Cornell
Master's
in
computer
boathouse.
science/information
sys-
1978
terns program
introduced.
1985
The Maris!
Institute
for
Public Opinion (MIPO)
Gartland
Commons
student
founded.
residences
open
for
upper-
First
of
three
Title Ill Grants
class
men.
received,
eventually
total-
ing $3 million.
1985-86
1979
Marist
plays in its
first NCAA
basketball
tournament,
Dr. Dennis
J. Murray
facing
Georgia
Tech
in
Baton Rouge,
Louisiana.
appointed
president.
Master's
in public
adminis-
Enrollment:
2,800
tration program intro-
Operating
budget:
duced.
$36,000,000
1980
Alumni: 8,900
Marist
receives
$1 million
grant from the
U.S.
Depart-
ment of Education.
Enrollment:
1,800
Operating
budget:
$13,500,000
Alumni:
5,800
1981
Computer
science
major
introduced.
Marist
Magazine
1986-87
Men's basketball
team
returns
to
NCAA
basketball
tournament,
facing
Pitts-
burgh in Tucson,
Arizona.
1987
Lowell
Thomas
Communica-
lions Center
completed.
1988
Maris!
enters $13 million
joint
study with the
IBM
Corporation
to
explore
innovative
applications
for
computer
technology
in a
small
liberal
arts college
environment.
1989-90
New athletic
fields
at
north
end
of
campus
open.
1990
The
Margaret
and Charles
Dyson
Center
opens.
Master's
in educational
psychology
program
introduced.
Enrollment:
2,973
Operating
budget:
$47,400,000
Alumni:
11,791
1991
Donnelly
Hall rededicated
after $8 million renovation.
Expansion
of
the Division
of
Sciences
includes
renovating
six
labs and
adding
seven
more.
Bureau
of
Economic
Re-
search
established
and
designated
a State Data
Center
Affiliate
in coopera-
lion with the
New
York
State Department
of Eco-
nomic Development
and
the U.S. Bureau
of
the·
Census.
1992
McCann
Baseball
Field
dedicated.
Greystone,
St.
Peter's,
and
the Kieran
Gate House
and
a
four-acre
parcel
of land
designated
as sites
on
the
National
Register
of
Historic Places.
~lik Smits '88, now with the
l1~diana
Pacers.
Inside the
Student Center rotunda.
1993
Marist
embarks
on $27
million construction
project that features
a new
Student
Center,
mid-rise
residence
hall, and campus
green.
Maris!
Extension
Center
at
Goshen,
N.Y.,
opens.
Master's
and advanced
certificate
programs
in
school
psychology
intro-
duced.
Football
elevated
to Division
I-AA.
1994
The Barron's
college
guide
names
Maris!
one
of
its
"best buys."
The
U.S.
News
&
World Report
college
guide ranks
Maris!
in the
top
tier
of northern
colleges
and
universities.
1995
Second
phase
of
MarisVIBM
Joint Study begins,
focus-
ing
on
development
of
a
digital
library.
U.S. News
&
World
Report
college
guide
again ranks
Maris! in the
top
tier of
northern
colleges
and
universities.
New
Nelly Goletti
Theatre
dedicated.
Women's
soccer becomes
a
varsity sport at
Division I
level.
Maris!
announces
it will
join
the
Metro Atlantic Athletic
Conference
in
1997-98.
CAUSE,
the association
for
managing
and
using
information
resources
in
higher
education,
recog-
nizes
Maris!
as one of the
top four colleges
and
universities
in the country
in
its
use of
technology.
1996
Men's basketball
team
becomes
the
first Maris!
team
ever
to
play
in
the
National
Invitation Tourna-
ment.
Ground
broken
on
Mccann
Center
expansion.
50th Commencement.
Enrollment:
3,245
(projected)
Operating
budget:
$63,500,000
Alumni:
16,290
13





























................
~
.
~
...................
.
Making
Th'e
Orphan
Trains
Free-lance documentary film
maker
Janet Graham
has combined
two
of
her
greatest
passions,
children and
film
making, in a recent project.
W
hen
you step onto
Janet Graham's porch
you
know there
are
children lurking
somewhere by
the milk
left at the bottom of two
small
glasses
on
the
porch.
Move
past the porch and
into
the house
and you'll
find
ample
evidence
she is truly dedicated
to
her
children.
The typical childrens' drawings
that are displayed throughout her
home are not stuck on the refrigerator
with
magnets
but are framed and hang-
ing
on the walls, reminiscent
of
price-
less
works
of
art. Graham
is
a free-
lance documentary
film
maker who
has combined two of her greatest pas-
sions, children and film making, m
her
most
recently
completed
project.
The idea
for"The Orphan
Trains,"
which aired
as
a
segment of "The
American
Experience"
on PBS on
Nov.
27,1995,
came to Graham in bits and
pieces. After
having
her
children,
11-
year-old twin boys Graham and Ben,
she
decided to focus her next project
on
children's issues. She soon discovered a
New
York Times
article about Orphan Trams by
Douglas Martin
and began mvestigaung fur-
ther. Graham met with
Ethel
Lambert,
archi-
vist for the
Children's
Aid
Society in New
York City,
and indicated her interest m pro-
ducing the story about the orphans. At first
Lambert
seemed
reluctant to share
agency
records wiLh Graham, but
Graham's innate
ability to
gain immediate
trust helped her
access
records that had
never been opened
to
even
the
most respected
scholars.
"At one
point Ethel
brought out a diary
that
had been written by
Charles
Loring
Brace,
founder
of
the Children's Aid Society, which
documented stories told to him by homeless
children livmg on
the
streets of New
York,"
recalls
Graham.
"During
our
readmg
of the
BY MAUREEN
J.
KILGOUR
'85/M '92
14
Janet Graham
'76
diary,
Ethd and
I were in tears. I knew
at
that
moment
I
had a great
story."
"The
Orphan Trains" is
a
poignant story.
It
details a part
of
history that few Amencans
are aware of, according
to
Graham.
"The
mod-
ern practice of
foster care had
iLs
roots in Lhe
Orphan
Trains,
an ambitious 19th-century
social experiment," says Graham.
"Between
1854 and 1929, the Children's Aid Society m
New
York,
and other
East
Coast
charities,
sent
more
than
150,000 orphaned,
abandoned
and neglec:ted
children
on
trains to
rural
com-
muniues Lo begin new lives as foster
chil-
dren."

After traveling for days,
the
children
were
taken Lo
a
small-Lown
church, meeting
hall,
or
opera
house,
where a crowd of
prospecLive
foster parents was encouraged to talk with the
children,
examine them, and ask any child
deemed suitable
to
accompany them home."
This proctss
of displaying children
in a mar-
ketplace on a stage gave birth
LO
the
phrase
"put
up for adopuon," says Graham.
"Many of
the children formed
strong, lovmg bonds wnh their
new
families;
others
were
treated indiffer-
ently; and some were abused."
Graham and her partner, Ed Gray,
have been workmg on this
compelling
story since becoming familiar
with the
basic
premise
of
the
Orphan
Trains
program
in
1990. The
two film
makers
were awarded a research and scripting
grant in 1992 and a producuon grant
in 1993
by the National Endowment
for
the Arts which enabled
them
to
produce
the
one-hour
documentary.
"When
the
funding
came
through
I
was thrilled,"
Graham
says
"Wnhout
the financial
support,
this film could
not have been made
and
this story
would not
have
been told."
Graham sought
funding
for
the
project
through
a variety of
corpora-
lions and was
turned
down each
time.
Many of the
companies found
the story
"Loo
dark"
or they
were
not
interested
m historical issues about children,
she
says. Graham supports the important
role NEA fundmg plays m ensuring
that not
only the
"bright"
stories
get
told.
Graham didn't start her
working
life as a film maker. After graduating
from
Marist
m 1976 wnh a B.A. in
American studies,
Graham began pur-
suing
a career
in
urban
planning.
She
at-
tended a
Harvard
inslllute on the subject
and
worked as assistant to the commissioner of
the Department of
Housmg Preservauon
and
Development in
New
York City. But
she found
the
politics involved too
cumbersome,
so tal-
ent and
circumstance
led
her in
a much
differ-
ent d1recuon. Graham got her
big
break
when
she met Emmy Award-winning documentar-
ian Tom Spain through
a mutual
fnend.
"A close
friend was
seated
next to Spain at
a
dinner
party when he
mentioned that
he was
in need of a researcher famihar wnh
rural
planning issues for his next proJect," Graham
remembers.
"I
actually
called
him from a
pay
phone
because
my roommate was on the
phone
forever!
I didn't let my lack
of experi-
ence stand
m the way. He hired me,
and
I have
been working in this industry ever smce.

Janet
Graham describes
herself
as shy,
yet
when you meet her, it's as
though
you
have
known
her all your
life. As a free-lance docu-
Manst Magazine
















[
---------------------.---
..........
...--------------------------,;!
~
A 1909 photo shows
Orphan
Train
children In Lebanon,
Missouri,
with escorts
from
the
Children's
Aid
Society.
mentary film maker,
Graham spends
much
of
her time interviewing people for research and
for actual film footage. Her inherent abilny to
make others
comfortable around
her
serves
her well
in
her
chosen field.
• Ah hough
I
enjoy each part of the process,
the part I
like the
most 1s finding
and inter-
viewing
the
right people for
the
story."
Graham credits Dr. Vincent Toscano. a
Manst
professor of history, with bringing out
her true love
of
history. In her JUnior
year at
Marist, Toscano
encouraged
Graham to enroll
in a history course
being
offered at the
Franklin
Delano Roosevelt
Presidential
Library
m Hyde
Park.
"It
w,1s a
fascinating experience
and I'm
sure that
my
interest in
making historical
films began wnh this class. Dr. Toscano en-
couraged
me
m
ways
no one
ever had before;
he
saw
through my shyness and
could
see that
I
had pot-ential."
Her
interest in social issues also blos-
somed at Manst. While in
college
Graham
participated in a
program
called "Youth in
America" and worked for a
local
communtty
center
where
she
helped distribute
food,
fi-
nancial assistance and
advice.
Currently Graham is focusing her time
and energy on raising funds for her latest film
project, a history
of eugenics
in America.
She
still
lives in
the area;
she
and her husband,
New York Times Special
Projects Editor Martin
Gottlieb, and their sons d1v1de
their
ume
between
a
country home m
Stone Ridge, N.Y.,
and
an
apartment on the Upper West Side of
New
York
City.
Graham has kept ties to Mari st
by maintammg friendships she established
more than
20 years ago.
Her house in Stone
Ridge is only
a quick
walk down
the
street
from her college
roommate, Marybeth Pfeiffer,
and she is m
regular
contact
wtth her
other
roommate, Patrice Connolly.
When
asked
to renect on her success her
answer is as unassum mg as
she
is: •
E
veryt hmg
is
clicking.
Life is
good."

IS




















c,
0
ver
Story
❖··
Thie
Dawn
of the Digital
Library
Marist
C:ollege
Builds
the
21st-C:entury
Library
I
magine sitting
in a
residence hall late
at
night studying for your
exam for a course titled His-
tory of the Roman Empire.
As part of your preparation,
you need
to
review a manu-
script written by the poet
Virgil during the fifth cen-
tury.
You access
the
Vatican
Library on the Internet on
your personal computer and
within
minutes,
a digital rep-
lica of Virgil's original manu-
script is before your
eyes.
hot
word,
"New
Deal," links
you
to
a video interview with
FDR scholar Doris Kearns
Goodwin on
Roosevelt's
strat-
egy for rebuilding America
through the Works
Progress
Administration. Another click
of the
mouse
and you are
viewing the
actual
footage of
Franklin Roosevelt's speech
before the Congress
in
1934
in which he
describes his
plan to revive
the
American
economy.
Envision a history semi-
nar on the presidency of
BY R. MARK
SULLIVAN
Pretend for a moment
that
you are teaching a course on
Shakespeare
to
English ma-
Franklin Delano Roosevelt. After accessing the course file
in
the
Marist College Electronic
Reserve
Room, you click on an
icon marked
"student
papers." Within seconds
21
series
of
annotated essays from fellow students
in
the seminar flashes
across your screen. You
choose
a few
that
look inter,esting and
download them to the
laser
printer at the end of the corridor
in
your residence hall. A few minutes
later
you return to the
course file and click on a hot word in the course syllabus. This
16
jors at Marist and local high school students connected
to the
College via interactive distance learning networks. Your stu-
dents are scattered
throughout
the campus and, indeed,
throughout
Dutchess County. Suddenly you realize the neces-
sity for them to read a critical analysis of the Bard of Avon's
treatment of courage and
deceit
in
"King
Lear" and "Macbeth."
You send an electronic message to each of your students
advising them
to
access the CD-ROM on Shakespeare off the
Marist Magazine



















·····················❖···············
The Marist library, under the leadership
of library Director
Johin
McGinty,
is evolving
from being
a repository
for books to an information
gateway that o'lfers a wealth of materials
through
a variety
of
delivery
systEims.
library's
network
server. Once downloaded to
each sLudent's client computer, the student
reads
Lhe
critical analysis, writes a short
paper
on his or
her reactions
and sends
the paper
electronically to your facully e-mail box. You
select the best
papers
and
house them
on the
virtual reserve shelf
in
the
Electronic Reserve
Room.
As
a fourth-year medical
technology
ma-
jor
doing
an
internship
at a New York City
teaching hospital,
you are anxious about pass-
ing the
"med
tech"
certification examination
coming
up
a
few
weeks after graduation. You
use
your
laptop
to access an
independent
study course in
the
Marist digital library that
has been created by your faculty mentor in the
sciences
division back
at Marist. One of the
icons on
the
course file is
labeled
"certification
questions" and contains a self-paced
tutorial
on key content areas covered on all certifica-
tion exams.
While
analyzing
blood
cultures in
the
hospital hematology
lab
you come across
a sample exam
question
that
relates
exactly
to
the
lab test you
are
performing. Suddenly,
your anxiety
about being
separated from
teacher, fellow
students and textbooks evapo-
rates
as you
realize
the benefits of immediate
access to
your own electronic course file.
Are
these
scenarios some
distant
look
in
the future
of higher education
7
Are they
ideal
impressions
of
how
students will gain access
Mansi
Magazine
to informal.ion in Lhe
years ahead? Some
might
think so,
but not
al
Marist,
where
the
College
is
engaged in another
Joint
Study with IBM on
the creation of one of the
most
advanced
digital libr:aries
in
the nation.
The timing of
this
research sLUdy
could
not have been better. Libraries, and in par-
ticular
aca,demic libraries, have entered the
era of the
information
highway, and as such a
paradigm
shift has occurred
in the
way librar-
ies are perceived and
managed.
The
challenges facing college and univer-
sity libraries are
formidable. Information
is
exploding at an
alarming rate.
All college
libraries,
inicluding those at the nation's most
prestigious
universities, are
coping with
lim-
ited storage space
to house their print
collec-
tions.
All c,olleges, even
those
with hefty en-
dowments,
are
struggling
Lo maintain finan-
cial equilibrium
in
an era of steady state
enrollment and declining
federal
and state aid
to
higher education.
As
the cost of
library
books
and materials continually exceeds
the
rate
of inflation, these financial
pressures
have
forced us to consider alternative
ways to
man-
age
library expenditures while
we
simulta-
neously
strive
to
improve
library
services.
Finally,
there is
the challenge
to develop
new
methods
to
more closely
link
library
information to
the
teaching
and learning pro-
cess.
The
li.brary of the
future
will
provide
Defining
the Library
of the 21st Century
S
ince the days of the Marist
Brothers, administrators of
Marlst College have had big
dreams. The founding Brothers
envisioned each new building
for their campus and then set
about building it themselves.
The College's ambitious
new digital library project also
started with a vision. Marlst
President Dennis
J.
Murray
described what a library is and
what It will become In a vision
statement circulated throughout
the campus:
"In
the 20th century, a
library was viewed as a
repository of Information where
users went to secure the
Information they needed.
The quality of the library was
generally measured by the
number of books and Journals
housed within Its walls.
"In
the 21.st century, a
library w/11
be a teaching and
service center at the hub of an
electronic network. It w/11
be
linked by fiber optics to all parts
of the campus, other libraries
and databases throughout the
world. It will retain some of Its
repository functions, but w/11
no longer be place-bound. The
focus of this library w/11
not be
on the size of Its collect/on but
rather on access to Information
needed by Its users, whether
that Information Is on- or off.
site. A library's quality w/11 be
measured by how quickly and
conveniently It meets users'
needs for reliable Information
at the lowest cost."

access
to
information
in
a
myriad
of for-
mats-books, manuscripts,
computer
data-
bases, multimedia
programs,
printed jour-
nals, electronic journals and other
formats
yet to
be
created. The challenge to educators
will be to capitalize on this rich diversity
of
information
sources to create more exciting
and productive teaching and learning envi-
ronments.
17




















18
A New Kind
of
Reserve
Room
D
uring
the
summer
of
1995,
nine Marist
faculty
members developed
a series of
prototype
courses that will test
the
initial applications
of
the
Electronic Reserve Room.
Offering not only a wide mix
of
disciplines
but
also a
variety of
multimedia
formats, these
nine
pilot courses will pave the way
for many more ERR-mounted
courses in the future.
This
initiative, led by Library Director
John McGinty, also relied
on
the
expertise
of a talented
team
of
professionals from Marist's
Office of Academic Computing,
Computer Center, library and
Office of
Institutional
Research.
What follows is
a
brief
description of these
prototypes.
George
Brakas
has mounted
a traditional approach to ethics
that Involves textual readings
from books and articles. He
makes two or three electronic
reserve reading assignments per
week. Brakas analyzes student
performance In this course
versus that of students In
another section taught without
the use of the ERR.
········❖·········
······················
In faci.ng these challenges, Marisl has an
opportuni1ty
to
move
forward al a
pace
much
faster
than
any other
liberal
ans college
in the
country. With planned computer system up-
grades as
pan
or our continuing Joint Study
with IBM, we will possess
the
necessary
amounts
d
storage capacity upon which
lo
build the electronic
repositories
that will be
essential ,components or the
library
or the
future. Creating these
repositories
will enable
us
to
store multimedia
of
all types and formats
including
books,
published articles, film,
video, audio, illustrations, archival
material
such
as manuscripts
or materials
developed
locally by our own faculty members.
Because
or our existing
network inrrastructure,
we will
have
the
capability
to
distribute multimedia
throughout
the campus
utilizing
multimedia
management software and other search/re-
trieval
tools
that
will be
developed
as
pan
or
the
study.
We
have
the potential to become a na-
tional
leader in
training
our slUdents
to use
these sophisticated technological
tools in
ways
that
will enable
them to become
selr-directed
and selr-paced
learners.
As the Librarian or
the Congress.James Billington, observes, "The
introduction of new
technology
in
libraries
such as multimedia digital
materials
can
pro-
vide
the
educational hook
to
attract people
into
libraries and introduce
a
line of self-
generated questioning
that
pulls
people back
into
books rather
than
away from
them."
E11visioning
the Electronic
Library
Mariist Board of Trustees Chairman Rob Dyson talks about the benefits
of c1reating a digital library, for the campus community and beyond.
M
arist's future
library
may
ultimately
bear
liule
resemblance to what most people
think of as a college library.
It
will no
longer
be
only a book repository where students
must:
go and search at
length
for information.
Marist College
President
Dennis Murray has
predicted that the
digital library
will be a
teaching
and service
center
at
the
hub of an
electronic network, linked by
fiber
optics to
all pans of the campus, other
libraries,
and
data bases
l
hroughout the
world. While
retaining
some of
its
n:pository functions, it will
no
lqnger
be place-bound.
and seminar
rooms all
linked
by
fiber-optic
cable
to
Marist's
mainframe computer.
Using
this
extensive fiber-optic
network,
which also
reaches
every other administrative
office
and
every residence hall room
on
cam-
pus,
the digital library
initiative
will directly
influence
teaching
and
learning
at
Marist,
Dyson believes.
The library's
electronic
col-
lections will offer text, graphics, image, sound,
video, animation and any other
form of
infor-
mation that
can be digitized.
Users will
be
able
to
access
this
material from
workstations in
the
library
itself
or
from
com-
puters
in
classrooms, residence
hall
rooms, homes,
offices, or
any other location.
One of those
most
enthusi-
astic about
the digital
library
project
is Rob Dyson, the
chair-
man of the board of
trustees
that
,governs
Marist.
As
a
mem-
ber o.fMarist's
board
since 1975,
Dyson has
seen Mari st
build the
advanced
information-technol-
ogy
iinfrastructure that
now al-
lows the College to create one
of
th.e
nation's
first
digital
aca-
demic libraries.
Rob Dyson
Dyson, chairman
and
chief
executive officer of
the
New
York
City-based Dyson-Kissner-
Moran Corporation,
believes
a
liberal arts education supple-
mented by
this state-of-the-an
information
technology
will
give
students a great advantage when
they
enter
the working world.
Dyson and his family have
also
helped
equip Marist for
the
Information Age by spon-
soring construction of
the
College's
Margaret
M.
a:nd Charles
H. Dyson
Center. Completed
in
1990, the 53,000-square-foot
center
houses
one of the campus's most sophisticated
and
most
heavily used computer classrooms,
in
addition to other classrooms, faculty offices,
"The
key
to
modern
society is
to
be
able to
be
broad-minded
and
flexible,"
Dyson says. "Jobs
are changing so
rapidly; functions
are chang-
ing rapidly. A
person
who
has been educated
in
the liberal
arts
tradition
has
the innate
ability
to
adjust and grow
as
conditions and
environments
and functions
change.
As far
as
business goes, everything is
being done faster.
Maris!
Magazine


















The
Marist/lBM
Joint
Study:
Progress
to Date
S
mee 1988 Marist has
been engaged
in
a
Joint
Study
with
IBM that
has
produced
dramauc improvements m the use of com-
puter
technology
in
every
facet
of
It
fe at the
College.
Among
the first
colleges
in the
nation
to establish an integrated voice and data net-
work
throughout
the
campus,
Manst
has
an
information
technology infrastructure un-
matched by
any
hberal
arts
college
m the country.
As
a consequence of our
parttcipauon
in this Joint
Study
and our ftnanc1al
commitment
to
invest
in
Dec1s1ons
are made
quicker.
The onset of world competi-
tion and the need to respond
to
customer
demand requires that
people be better educated and
comp:tent in a wide variety of
areas
The needs of soc1et
y re-
quire
that the Marist
hbrary
fun her embrace technology,
Dyson elaborates.
"The
library
of
tomorrow
that
Manst must
create
1s one that embraces the
trad111ons
of the library envi-
ronment-that 1s, allowing us-
ers to
carry
out
research
using
current, past, and even rare
documents-but
that
has to
be
coupled
with technology
that
enables you to obtain mforma-
uon as quickly as possible."
··········❖·········
technolog:1-related
capital
improvements, the
College
has
positioned
itself
as a
leader
in
the
use of information technology m the liberal
arts college environment.
We
ha\·e
docu-
mented
the benefits
to
small
and
medium-
sized colkges of operaung m an IBM mam-
frame env,
ronment. We have significantly
improved
our administrative compuung
sys-
tems.
We
have created an onlme library cata-
log and c1rculat1on
system. We have mstalled
an
advanced
telecommunications
system
throughout
the
campus and created a
distrib-
uted
computing
environment with the pur-
chase of more than $2 million worth of net-
worked personal computers for faculty and
admm1strators. We
have
upgraded
student
computer labs and created two new faculty
mult1med1a
laboratones. We have wired ev-
ery
classroom,
office,
lab
and
residence hall
room
for voice/data network connecuvtty.
At
President Dennis Murray's
urgmg and wnh
the
faculty's
concurrence,
we have
created a
course
m
information
technology
for
all students. one of the first such
courses
in
the country.
Finally, we
have
launched
a
number
of
"show-
case· academic computing proJects
that
have attracted mternauonal at-
Orson believes. "Whtie colleges
have a wide variety
of
acm·1t1es
going on all
the
time, their fun-
damental purpose 1s to educate
the
student
populauon. The
li-
brary
1s the
hub of
the
wheel that
dnves that educauon and rem-
f orce:;
the
classroom
e xperie nee."
The library will also allow
Manst to expand its
service
to the
commumtr another component
of the
College's
m1ss10n.
"Mem-
bers
of
the
community,
especially
the local public and
educational
mstnuuons, will be
able
to access
the library
as
they
have been able
to make use
of
so many of the
other fac1liues
on the
campus
If
anything, the Marist library will
become more user-fnendly than
n 1s now, because the abilny of
the physical plant and
the
ab1lny
of the technology to handle in-
creasmg demands will be greatly
enhanced," Dyson says.
"That
1s
one of the strengths that Manst
has always had," he adds.
·we
have never turned our back on
the
community.
Instead, as
we
ha\'e grown, so has our outreach
mto the mid-Hudson Valleycom-
muntty."
Marist's
charge
in
the fu-
ture is to make progressively
more
1nforma11on
available by
computer and at the same time
be user-friendly. D}'SOn
notes.
·The
practical impact of that
for students
1s that
availability
of information will not be lim-
ned by the number of physical
copies
m
the library or on cam-
pus. The only limitation will
be
the ability of the student to
ass1m1late
the
mformauon
that
1s instantaneously available."
Marist
Board
of
Trustees
Chaimtan
Rob Dyson
(left) discusses
technology
with
Marist
With the dig1tal library
proJect, the College's commg
years will continue to be charac-
terized by cxctting growth and
The College is uniquely po-
sit toned
to
create the library of
President
Dennis Murray in a
computer-equipped
classroom
in
the Dyson
Center.
the
21st century,
Dyson
adds. "Marist has an
edge
on
virtually every other
school
I
can
thmk of because of our
technical
and
com-
puter-sharing arrangements
wtth IBM,
which
has been a terrific supporter of this college."
Marist's, digital library, although vastly
different frc,m the ongmal
campus
library
built by the
founding
Manst Brothers,
wtll
support the Brothers' ongmal
mission
for the
College of pursuing academic excellence,
change, D}'son obsen·es.
"The
alumni,
the
board of
trustees,
and all of
the
academic
personnel here should be very
proud
of
what Manst has accomplished m the past.
They also should be elated al what Manst
ts-
and what
It
is going
to
be "

19






















20
Margot
Hardenbergh
has
developed a syllabus for
her course folder in
Mass
Communications
that takes
advantage of several
media
formats in
IBM's
Visuallnfo
digital library
software.
The
students complete several
assignments
using materials
mounted in the
folders that
include analyzing
radio
broadcasts,
public service
announcements in video
and
tabular data
on
the
communications Industry and
media
usage.
Richard
Lewis
is
conducting
his Digital Painting
class utlllzlng
animation soft-
ware in which the
students
create
their
own cartoons and
dlgltal
creations.
This
class
Includes
text,
graphics and
video applications
in
Visuallnfo. Since Lewis has
taught this course before with
some aspects of
multimedia
and computer storage
capablllty,
it wlll be
a good
test for demonstrating how the
organizational capabilities of
Visuallnfo can
improve course
delivery.
.....................
❖·····················
LenLion
and given our faculty and sLUdenLs
exLensive
visibiliLy
in hundreds of media mar-
keLs.
Vi:sion
for the Future
N
ow Lhat Marist has accomplished many of
Lhe original objectives of the
first
Joint
Study, it i:s poised
to
move into another more
compelling
and more exciting phase of re-
search, one that will
have
a direct
influence
on
the
teaching and
learning
process
at
Mari st
and potentially throughout
the
entire
higher
education world.
The primary
questions
driv-
ing
this new Joint Study are
the
following:

Can we effecLively
utilize the technology we
have
to
enhance
the teaching
and
learning
process
7

Can we use technology to
help
faculty and
students gain unbridled access to
informa-
tion and data available over the
Internet,
the
Wo1rld
Wide Web and other entry ramps
onto the
information
superhighway?

Can we generate
the
necessary information
needed to support
the
curriculum by tak-
ing
advantage of new forms of scholarly
publication
7

Can we effectively
harness technology
to
help
us,
customize education for our stu-
dents
so
that
learning
is
more self-paced
and
self-directed and
less
teacher-directed
in
trad1itional
classroom settings?
At
the
same time, can
we
become
a model
for
collaborative
learning
in
this technological
environment
7

Can we capitalize on
the
dominant strength
we have
in
terms
of our
technology
infra-
structure-an integrated telecommunica-
tions
and computing neLwork serving all
members of
Lhe
Marist
community?
The Marist/1BM
team
that
designed
the
next
phase of the
Joint
Study
determined
at
the
outset that we could
respond affirmatively
to
each of
these
questions.
Furthermore, it
determine:d
that
by focusing our efforts on
technological
change in the library,
we would
be
in
the
best position
to
accomplish our
goals.
Why
the
library? There are
many
rea-
sons.
The
library
links
published
knowledge
to
the
teaching
and
learning
experiences of all
academic
disciplines.
The
library and
its
staff
pursue
a
dynamic
relationship with the fac-
ulty
in
developing
collections that actively
support
instruction and research
needs.
The library serves as the
principal
conduit
of external
scholarship
to
the
campus.
As
such, librarians
will
be challenged in the
future
to
work with
faculty
and
students to
redefine tlhe
scope and scale of information
access when, as a
result
of electronic pro-
cesses, boundaries are no
longer
local, con-
tent is more
current
and evanescent,
informa-
tion
choices
are
limitless
and library technol-
ogy tools are
constantly changing.
As a
multipurpose center
for
information
storage
and
retrieval, the library is poised to
support new knowledge delivery systems. Fac-
ulty will appreciate the rewards of speed,
precision and versatility
inherent
in
electronic
access.
The
capability of bringing these re-
sources
into
the
classroom at any time from
any location on campus will greatly enhance
the
teaching
process, while the capability of
transmitting
electronic
documents from
the
faculty office to
the
student
residence
hall
and vice versa will greatly improve learner
productivity. The
library
will serve as
the
"knowledge
clearinghouse"
in
this
dynamic.
interactive
learning
process. The ability
to
adapt
to the
changing needs of faculty and
students appears
to
be enhanced as emerging
technologies
build upon
the
foundation of
digital
sLorage
reLrieval
and
Lransmission.
The
challenge to faculty and
information
profes-
sionals will be
to
work
together to
ensure
effective access
to
high-quality content.
Finally,
the
library
at Marist-as will
likely
be
Lhe
case
at all college
libraries-will
in-
creasingly
take on the
role
of
the
College's
learning resources center. The library's
role
will evolve from being a
repository
for
books
to
serving as an
information
gateway
that
offers a wealth of
materials
through
a
varieLy
of
delivery
systems.
In addiLion to being
a
repository
for books, it will
become
a deposi-
tory
for
the creative
work
of our own faculty
and
students engaged in
the
learning process.
The
changing needs of
learners,
the
refine-
ments
of learning
theory that
incorporate
many sources and many modes of
learning,
and
the likelihood
that college students
in the
future will be
more
attuned to
interactive
learning
collectively
introduce
the questions
of where
and how colleges
will
meet
these
challenges.
The
library
is
the
ideal
place to
start.
The
Marist/lBM
Joint
Study:
Moving
from
Vision
to Action
W
ith
the foregoing in
mind,
a new
Joint
Study was launched during
the
fall of
1994.
There are many aspects of
the
study,
each
of
which forms
the
building
blocks
for
the
development
of
a full-fledged digital
li-
brary. In
simple
terms,
all aspects of
the
study
deal
with the
production
and delivery of
li-
brary content over computer
networks.
In
actuality,
the project presents a
host
of
tech-
nological
and cultural challenges that
will test
the limits of how
we teach, how we
learn
and
how we
access information.
The
first phase
of
the
project
focuses on
ways to
integrate multimedia applications
in
the
teaching
process.
Multimedia
is often
de-
Maris! Magazine
















·····················❖····················
Dan Cooper, assistant professor
of finance, is
one of
the Many faculty members
involved
in Marist's
innovative
Electronic Reserve
Room project. The ERR offers multimedia
course
materials
online for
students
to access 24 hours a day from any location.
scribed as a
melding
of different communica-
tions tools
in
order to enhance the ways
in
which content is
delivered
and presented.
Multimedia computer software is used to
merge
text, sound, graphics. still
images,
and
full-motion video
into presentation
formats
that are devised
by the
presenter.
The
advantage of
multimedia
is that it
responds to
the differing
ways in which stu-
dents absorb knowledge. Based on the pio-
neering
work
of Harvard
Professor Howard
Gardner on
the
theories of
multiple intelli-
gences,
we know that
some students are visual
learners, others
are audio-sensitive learners
and some absorb
knowledge
most effectively
by reading. Multimedia tools have
proved
effective
in
helpingstudentscomprehend
sub-
ject
matter
in
ways
that
best
suit
individual
learning styles.
Marist
is
uniquely situated to
move
ag-
gressively
into multimedia
forms of instruc-
tion given
the
fact
that
we
possess
a network
to
port multimedia
content around
the
cam-
pus. The best
vehicle for
using
this content,
whether it be
produced
on campus
by
our
faculty or downloaded from the World Wide
Web,
is the academic course.
Therefore,
we
envision
the
development of electronic course
files
or electronic course folders
in
which
content
will be
stored by the host computer
server in the digital
library.
Maris!
Magazine
This phase of the
Joint
Study has already
started and will
continue
throughout
the four-
year study. New faculty computing and mul-
timedia development labs have
been created
in the Lowell Thomas Communications Cen-
ter.
A new
master
classroom, equipped with
the
latest
multimedia
presentation hardware
and software, is heavily used in the new
camJPUS
center, prompting serious consider-
ation
by the administration
about adding
mon~
electronic classrooms
in
other parts of
the
campus.
Most
importantly,
faculty
in all
academic disciplines are
using
computer
tech-
nology to enrich their courses in
ways few
imagined were
possible
a year
ago.
An
Electronic
Reserve
Room
P
erhaps the
most
innovative aspect of the
dligital library project-and one that
has
the
most potential of improving the teaching
and learning process-is
the Electronic
Re-
serve
Room.
Before we can envision the devel-
opment of a full-fledged
digital library,
we
need
to
experiment with
projects
that will
enga.ge faculty and students
in
tasks that
dem-
onstrate
the
effectiveness of the library as a
central clearinghouse for electronic content.
In
its basic format,
the
Electronic Reserve
Room, or ERR, is a
digital
version of
the
Vince
Toscano
1s
encouraging the students in
his American History survey
courses to use primary source
material In text and video to
Illustrate how each generation
In our history dealt with the
significant problems of their
time. Toscano Is coordinating
with history faculty members
Tom Wermuth and Robin Rosen
to share the common narrative
of American history and create
a series of case studies that
probe specific national Issues.
Thomas
tynch's
Introduction to Environmental
Issues course uses research
articles, government reports
and selections from the
popular press and broadcast
Industry to Illustrate differing
viewpoints and Information
sources available for decision-
making. Students use the
folder outside of class for
completing specific
assignments. Text and
hypertext links form the
folder.
21












22
Steven
KIiiion
uses
the Vlsuallnfo
software to
provide text
and hypertext
links
and
to develop
stu-
dent writing portfolios
with
the freshmen
In
his
College
Writing I
course.
The
fold-
ers are an
Integral part
of
regular
class sessions.
He
Is emphasizing
full partici-
pation
of students In
mounting their
own
mate-
rial Into the ERR.
Joseph
KirUand
Is
teaching
an
Excursions
In
Math
class
to freshmen
In
which the
electronic
reserves
Include
math problem
sets,
exams, and
papers with
text
and graphical
resources
added for support In complet-
ing
assignments.
The
same
students
taking Steve
Kllllon's College Writing
class
will
be enrolled In
this
class.
.....................
❖·····················
Assistaurt
Professor
of Communication
G.
Modele
Clarke (above) works
with
students
on desktop publishing
software
in
the Char1es
and Cornelia
Murray
Journalism
Room.
traditional reserve
room that
has
long
been a
pan of all
college
libraries. We intend lo trans-
form the tradiuonal prim-based reserve room
into a computer-based information storage
and retrieval center, accessible 10 all on-cam-
pusand off-campus library users via the
Mansi
network
and
the Internet.
Our new
reserve
room will provide the user with screen re-
trieval and laser prim output of whatever
information
the
course instructor chooses
Lo
house in the ERR course file. The potential
educauonal benefits of the ERR are extraordi-
nary.
fc,r example, a
faculty member
could
store
in electronic
course
folders the course
syllab1Js,
lecture notes, sample tests, supple-
mentary readings, condensed course packets
of selected readings, public domain materials
(materials not covered by copyright) and
materrials protected by copyright where the
author's permission has been obtamed. Other
materials, organized around the course teach-
ing goals,
could include
the
professor's own
writings and research, student papers, files
from students and faculty at other colleges
where: similar courses are being taught, and
relevant
content
from
the World Wide
Web.
Student and faculty biographical and b1b-
hogra
phical information
also could be
repre-
sented
in
a folder in
the
ERR course file.
Archival materials from historical treasures
such as the Vaucan Library and the FDR
Prcsidenual Library could be
dignized and
scanned into a lecture presentation ora home-
work exercise. In the future. as more and
more faculty tailor their course
delivery
tech-
niques lo take advantage of emerging digital
library applications hke the ERR, new ways of
teaching may surface.
As
course materials
increasingly become tailored
lo
instructor
teaching styles and student learning styles,
traditional reliance
on
three
or four course
texts
will diminish.
Text
and supplementary
readmgs will merge wnh locally defmed con-
tent 10 produce new mstrucuonal course pack-
ets. The ERR
will help facilitate that
change.
Perhaps we may see sometime in the fu-
ture the gradual d1mmution of our traditional
pedagogical
techniques
of lecture and lab
in
favor of a return 10
the
British "reader" system
whereby faculty primarily serve as mentors
and directors of each student's
quest
for knowl-
edge and mastery of content
material.
The
"electronic
tutorial" may become as 1mpor-
1an1
a
pan
of the
learnmg
process as faculty/
student interaction in
the
classroom.
If
so,
Mansi will be at the forefront of this learning
transformauon.
In effect, the
Electronic
Reserve Room is
the prototype of the electronic library of the
future.
The
digital library user of tomorrow
will search one or
more
libraries from
the
classroom, the office or even from the home.
These libraries will hold 1rad1uonal
card cata-
Mansi Magazine




















····················❖····················
log information
as
well
as
images,
sound,
computer
files
and electronic
books
and
maga-
zines. The user
will find
it
easy to search
for
items,
copy pictures,
print
computer
files
to
local
printers and
read
electronic journals
right
off the
screen.
A
student
researcher
may
simply
pull
some items down
into his
or her
own
private library
to build a
repository
for
further study and
research. The
electronic
library
will
be
the well
where
users
will
go to
get
text, images, documents
and video to
build
well-researched
and
content-rich
pa-
pers and
reports.
Historians will write about
the period of
1995 to 2005 as the
time when
content
mate-
rials to
support
learning
environments be-
came electronic.
The
cost of
technology
to
digitize, store, access
and move
content
elec-
The
IBM
Digital
Library
Initiative
I
BM launched Its Dlgltal Library
Initiative worldwide In March
1995 with a select group of
Institutions Including Marlst
College. The project Is designed
to facilitate
"anytime,
any-
where"
access
to books,
periodicals, works
of
art, film,
music and rare manuscripts.
The digital library that will
emerge
from this Initiative prom-
ises to be a national model and
one of the most technologically
advanced
Information centers
on any college campus.
A powerful mainframe com-
puter will permit thousands
of
users to "borrow" simulta-
neously from a wealth of multl-
medla holdings. Whether at the
library Itself or from their resi-
dence hall rooms on campus
or
distant locatlons In the local
community and beyond, library
users will be able to pull mate-
rial from the electronic shelves
of the digital library for Instant
tn:mically is
on the edge of replacing
physical
materials as
the
preferred way of handling
material
associated with most instruction.
The center of
this revolution
will
be the
library
Electronic
Reserve Room,
where fac-
ulty will
accumulate from
worldwide source
materials what
is most appropriate
to
support
the
learning environments for
their
courses.
Leadership to create
the infrastructure
to
sup-
port
this
vision
must
come
from
college ad-
ministrators, librarians, information
technolo-
gists and the
creative
minds
of faculty
dedi-
ca.ted
to
harnessing the benefits
of
technology
in ways that
enhance
the teaching
and
learning
process. That
leadership and
the
vision
for
positive
change can
be
found today at
Marist
College.

As
exN
utive vice president at Marist for nine
years,
R. Ma
Sullivan
(above)
worted
closely
with the
IBM
!Corporation
on the College's
digital
library
projec:t and
other collaborative
studies that have
brought the College nationwide recognition for its
use of t;echnology. He recently was named
president
of the College of
Saint
Rose in Albany,
New
Yort.
use In the classroom, home or office.
The digital library will revolutionize th1e way people teach and learn by
allowing Instructors and students alike to
◄:ollaborate
onllne. It will also open
the doors of a vast digital collectlon to loca1I libraries and elementary and high
schools and provide tools for job training and economic development.
Other Institutions affiliated with IBM in digital library projects
Include
the
Library of Congress, the Vatican Library, the Los Angeles City Public Library,
the New York Public Library, the Unlve1rsity of Michigan, Case Western
Reserve University and Archivo General de lndlas/Spaln.

Marist Magazine
Dan
Cooper
conducts a
course In finance that utilizes
a multlmedla approach, taking
advantage of Web resources
and the ability of
students
to
use computer workstations to
be Interactive participants in
the course. He is using text,
sound and video In his folders
directly in class, with
hypertext links to the Web
being part of the folder.
Caroline
Rider
leads
her International Trade
Management course using
textual, graphical and digJtal
material from the Internet
mounted Into a folder.
Students are expected to
complete
assignments In
each
week's classes by using
the material in the folders.
Currency exchange and mar-
ket information Is updated
regularly, making this a
dynamic ERR folder.

23























··········❖·········
In Rare Form
Rare documents on the environment, Lowell Thomas and Hudson Valley history
are among
the valuable materials
in
the Marist
Library's
special collections, which
will remain accessible
alongside
the College's new digital
library.
A
s Manst breaks new ground m
using
technology
lo enhance
the
learning experience,
students,
faculty
and
administrators are fully prepared 10 exn
the 20th
century online.
From
faculty
offices to residence hall rooms to admm-
istrauve offices,
Man
st
ts
truly
a "w1
red"
campus.
The
College
library,
a structure built
by the Mansi Brothers m 1957, has also
entered the electronic age. If everythmg
goes according
to
plan, a new fac1h1y
will
become the
headquarters of
one
of
the
most advanced d1g11al
libraries m the
country
and make Manst's name
synony-
mous wnh advanced mformauon
storage
and
delivery.
But
any talk of electronic libraries
leads
naturally
to
the quesuon,
"Where
do books fit
into the library of the future?" Marist has
some
wonderful
collecuons of
unique and
valuable
documents, books,
and
memorabtha.
Will
they
conunue
to be
used, or
are
they
never
to
be
touched again as the paradigm shift occurs
and the library integrates technology more
and more mto the way 11 functions'
Those who
love
books need not worry.
The
special collections
will remain
as
re-
sources for students, faculty
and
the general
pubhc. The
collecuons,
valued in the m1lhons
of dollars, range from
an extensive set of
blues
records, described by
Rolling
Stone
magazine
as "the single
most impressive private
collec-
tion
of
its type in the
country,"
10 a group of
rare books d1s1ingu1shed
by hidden pamtings
on the edges of their pages.
Library director John McGmty 1s
excned
about these
unique resources.
"The
scholarly
value of these collections cannot
be
overem-
phasized," McGinty says. "As research materi-
als, social and poliucal
commentaries,
and
historical arufacts, they are irreplaceable. The
access
to
primary materials has an
instruc-
tional and intellectual impact that cannot
be
duplicated."
One umque collection is that donated by
the environmental preservation group Scenic
Hudson, Inc. It
contains correspondence,
transcripts of
hearings, memoranda,
studies,
reports, news clippings, photographs and au-
diovisual materials
re
lat mg to the
Storm
King/
Consolidated Edison legal controversy that
BY
ANN
WINFIELD
24
The Weininger
Collection
includes
an edition of
the
Haggadalh
of Passover
illustrated by
Marc
Chagall,
published
by Leon Amiel
Publishers
in
1987.
set
important precedents
m
environmental
law. In September 1962,
Con
Ed announced
plans
to
build a
pumped
storage facility,
the
largest
of its kind
in the
world, at Storm King
Mountain along a particularly scenic and his-
toric part
of
the Hudson R1,·er. The Scenic
Hudson Preservation Conference was founded
m 1963 to oppose the facility and succeeded
in doing so.
The records documenting the organiza-
uon's ac:u,·1ues
are now kept ma designated
area
m the library, alongside the Hudson
River
Environmental
Society
(HRES)
Library.
Originally
located
at
the
Norrie
Point
Envi-
ronmental Center, the HRES material was
donated to Marist in 1991
and
opened to the
public
in
1992 ltcons1s1sofmore1han
1,400
books and documents about the
Hudson
River. Mostly
scientific
in
nature, it contains
fascinating glimpses into
the
aquatic life of the
nver.
practices. For many years, he lived m
Pawling, New York, just 20 miles from
Marist, from
which
he received
an
hon-
orary
degree
in
1981.
His personal li-
brary was donated by his family to the
College
upon his death.
The Lowell Thomas material also
mcludes
memorabilia
from his
many
adventures. The
Lowell
Thomas Com-
mumcauons
Center
displays photo-
graphs, umforms, cameras, and other
rare items Thomas collected.
Most
stnk-
mg,
perhaps,
are
the photographs
and
artifacts
that
Lowell and
his
son, Lowell
Jr., brought back from their 1949 visit to
the Dala1 Lama in Tibet, a
year
before China
invaded
the
country.
Another set of
important historical
docu-
ments pertaining to
the
development of
radio
and television ts the John Tillman Collection.
It
consists
of 110 reels of filmed interviews by
John Tillman, a newscaster for WPIX televi-
sion in New
York from 1946
until 1967.
The
2,400 interviews feature personalities
from
the fields of politics, sports, and entertain-
ment mcluding
every
U.S. president, every
governor of New York, every mayor of New
York
Cny, a number of
world
leaders and
every important athlete of
the
period.
Together, the Lowell Thomas and John
Tillman materials make up a
comprehensive
and detailed history of
the
development of
communications m America up until
the
tech-
nological
revolution.
"The communications
major is one of our
strongest
and most popu-
lar at Marist, so
ll
1s fitting that our most
focused
collecuon should
be m this field,"
says
McGinty.
The
library
also contains yearbooks
and
other material relating to
Mansi
College his-
Like the Hudson River
documents,
the items m
Marist's.
Lowell Thomas Col-
lection
are extremely valuable
1ntellec'lUally
and historically.
Lowell Thomas was a big-story
reporter, a prolific
author,
an
entrepreneur, an
aviation pio-
neer, a sportsman, and an ex-
plorer. Through seven decades,
up until his death
in
1981
at
the age of 89, he was at the
forefront of most
major
ad-
vances in
communications
Marist's
special collections
include 35 books, donated by
George
M.
Gill,
that
contain some of
the
best existing
examples
of
the
17th•century
art of
"Fore-Edge"
painting.





















Marist's library
houses
many of the papers of Lowell
Thomas. Above,
Lowell
Thomas
talks with President
Franklin D.
Roosevelt
at the
annual
softball
game
betwee1n
White House
correspondents
and Thomas's
Nine
Old Men team.
They
played
at
Thomas's
home in Pawling,
New
York,
20
miles
from Roosevelt's
family
estate in Hydu
Park.
tory dating to the 1950s.
"This
is a collection
that
gets used a lot," says McGinty.
"I
get
requests
about the archives almost
daily,
from
the
president,
administrators, students,
fac-
ulty, and local
researchers."
Another comprehensive collection
is
one
on local
history
created by Wilma Burke, an
adjunct
professor
at Marist who developed a
regional-history
curriculum. Using grant
money, she gathered books,
photographs,
and documents
dealing
with the historical,
artistic, geographic, and
religious
develop-
ment
of
the Hudson
Valley, from Columbia
and Greene counties down to Westchester
and
Rockland. Marist
has thus become a lo-
cal-history
resource
for researchers. commu-
nity groups.
and the
media,
as well as for
students and faculty.
Plans
call
for
many of
these documents and photographs eventually
to
be accessible via
the World
Wide Web and
Internet.
T
he Rick Whitesell Record
Collection was
donated
to Marist by the
family of
Rick
Whitesell,
an alumnus fascinated with blues
music. His love of
music
led
him to
assemble
an assortment of recordings that chronicles
an
important segment of
American
musical his-
tory from the turn
of the century through the
1950s. Although
a
preponderance
of the re-
cordings are of vocal groups. other forms
are
also
represented. The material
also
includes
feature
stories and interviews with
top re-
cording artists from
the 1920s to
the
'60s
that
Whitesell wrote
as editor and feature
writer
of
Goldmine,
a publication for record collectors.
Professor Tad Richards
of
the
English
depart-
ment currently
uses the material
as a
research
tool
in his class, "The
Literature
of the
Blues."
The Richard and
Gertrude
Weininger
Col-
lection
in Judaic Studies supports
Marist's
longstanding Jewish
studies
program
and
provides
resources for
students and faculty
Maris! Magazine
a.cross a
number of
disciplines, including
an,
literature, philosophy,
and
history.
The
Weininger material
includes
documents and
cultural
and
religious books
written by promi-
nent
Jewish
writers and scholars as well
as
reference
works, videotapes,
and periodical
subscriptions.
For
the past year,
grants
from
the
Richard
and Gertrude
Weininger Founda-
tion
have
allowed
the
College to
add
consid-
erably
to
the original collection,
and to
aug-
ment
its circulating holdings with additional
copies of popular
novels
or less prominent
but excellent works by authors already
repre-
s,ented. The
library
has also branched out into
areas such as Talmudic studies and
literature
on
the Holocaust.
The
material is
used
frequently
by
stu-
dents and
faculty, including
Dr. Milton
Teichman,
a professor of
English
and Holo-
caust scholar
who recently published
a
work
on concentration-camp
literature.
The
Weininger
gifts have
been made in honor
of
Capt.
Paul X. Rinn,
a
memberofMarist's Class
of
1968.
Marist has
recently
become
the home of
the
George M. and
Alice S.
Gill
Collection
of
"Fore-Edge,"
35 rare books
significant be-
cause of
the pictures
on
the
edges
of
their
pages.
This style
of
decoration, called "fore-
edge"
painting,
dates from
17th-century En-
gland and was
used
to
secretly
identify a
book's
ownership.
The
collection, appraised
as;
one of
the largest of its
kind
in private
hands, was
donated
to
Marist by
George
Gill,
a former vice president of
Poughkeepsie
Sav-
ings Bank
who
now
lives
in
Florida.
Even
as the development of a
digital
li-
brary at Marist progresses, McGinty is
well
aware
of the
importance
of what
lies in
Marist's
special collections. "To
build
and house a
world-class library today,
an institution must
embrace and
integrate technology into
library
functions and services, but this does not mean
Marist's
Special Collections
Scenic
Hudson
Documents
Documents
relating to the Storm King
Mountain/Consolidated
Edison legal con-
troversy in the 1960s in the
Hudson
Valley that set precedents
in
environmen-
tal
law.
Hudson River Environmental
Society
Library
Books and documents, mostly scientific,
about the
Hudson
River.
Lowell Thomas Collection
Photos,
diaries, correspondence,
news
clippings, films, and recordings of this
exploring and broadcasting pioneer who
lived
20 miles
from
Marist in Pawling,
New York.
Richard and Gertrude Weininger
Collection In Judaic Studies
Books, periodicals and videos
by promi-
nent
Jewish
writers
and
scholars or per-
taining
to
Jewish
culture.
George M. and Allee S. Gill
Fore-Edge Collection
Books
decorated in
the 17th-century style
known as "Fore-Edge,"
referring to paint-
ings on
the
page edges
that
are not visible
until the
pages
are fanned.
John Tillman Collection
Reels
of
interviews
with celebrities of the
period 1946-196 7
by
this newscaster
for
New York's
WPIX-TV.
Marlstiana
Marist College yearbooks and photos
documenting the College's
history.
Local History
Books, photos, and other material
relat-
ing
to the
history, geography and culture
of the
Hudson
Valley.
Rick
Whitesell
Record Collection
Blues
recordings that
chronicle American
musical
history
from
1900 through the
1950s,
collected by
this Marist
alumnus
who was an editor and writer for Goldmine
magazine.
In
addition to
these
special collections,
the
Marist music department maintains
the
Nelly Golettl Music Collection.
compositions
by this pianist, singer and
composer who was a headlining enter-
tainer
throughout
Europe and for whom
the Marist
theatre
is now named.

at the expense of the more traditional method
of storing
books, manuscripts,
music, what-
have-you. While we will be
putting
some of
the
more
significant pieces
from
collections
onto
the Internet
and the
World Wide
Web,
the physical
materials
will be
kept here
for our
students and faculty, and the public, to access
as they need
to."

25




















26
It takes more than com-
mitment
to
reach a
goal.
Sometimes
it takes help from
others who believe in the
same dream.
Harold
and Anne
Miller
be-
lieve in
the
importance of edu-
cation.
Which
is
why,
eight
years
ago,
they
established
the
Harold and
Anne
Miller
Scholarship
Fund for Adult Stu-
dents.
Since 1988
this very
generous endowment has pro-
Marist Family
Tree
I
n all the: excitement of Commencement Day
1996, few in the
procession
of graduating
students would have noticed the Japanese red
maple m:e, midway between Greystone and
Donnelly Hall, as they passed beneath
11
on
their way
to
the campus green to
receive
their
degrees.
Yet on this 50th Commencement Day, the
tree was a living symbol
of
Marist's half-
century as a four-year institution. It was
planted
Sept. 20,
1946,
the day the College
won its charter from New York State to grant
bachelor's degrees. Bro. Paul Ambrose, then
head of the
College,
was so pleased about
the
charter
that he wanted to plant a tree
to
commemorate
the
occasion.
Bro. Paul
shows
students
Melanie Fester and Michael
LaCucna
the tree
he planted 50
years ago.
Believing
in
EducaNon
"So
I
went to Esopus, where we had a
mansion
then,
and some property, and
there
were two Japanese red maples on enher side
of the entrance," he remembers.
"There
were
shoots underneath both trees.
I
took one eight
inches
tall." That day Bro.
Paul planted the
shoot at
Marist
in what came to be called
Charter Grove.
The grove took on added meaning the
following year when the College's first gradu-
ating class of four Marist
Brothers
celebrated
its
commencement
there. Since
then,
the
shoot
has grown into a tree more than
10
feet tall,
and Manst's graduating classes have grown
from
four
to 960
students,
compnsing 16,000
alumni.
"I
hope
that
somebody
will have the idea
to plant another tree," says Bro. Paul,
"for
the
next
50 years."

satisfaction of helping people
achieve an education and
then seeing
them
contribute
to society is very gratifying.·
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Miller Join
summa
cum
laude Marist craduates
Elizabeth
Teed an~I Arthur J. Brown,
Jr., recipients
of
Harold and Anne
Miller
Scholarships
for Adult Students.
Beth was Number
1
In the Class
of '9S,
a1nd
Art was the Next
In
Merit award winner.
The
Millers, lifelong
resi-
dents
of Poughkeepsie,
also
believe
in
the importance of
helping those
around
them.
"Successful
people
in
the
community
should think
about giving back as we have
done."
Endowed scholarships not
vided 107 scholarships to bright and highly motivated
only help Marist students; they also help cement Marist's
financial future.
adults
pursuing
bachelor's degrees.
"Anne and
I
have been just delighted
to develop
this
scholarship program,· says Mr. Miller.

As time goes on,
we
become more and more enthusiastic about it.
The
For more Information about developing an endowment or
other
gift to help Mar/st move Into the 21.st century, please
contact
Shal/een Kopec, Vice President for College Advance-
ment, at
(91.4)
575-3000, ext. 241.2.






















································❖··
Everything's
Coming Up Roses
Marist's
music
program blossoms,
thanks to a
spirited
director and an active
and
dedicated choir
and band.
I
t is Tuesday night at 9:25.
In
the choral
room, designed
to
hold 50, 90 smgerschat
with their friends.
The
room gets
hot
very
quickly. especially m the winter, and pckets
and sweaters find
their
way
to the floor.
Dr.
Ruthanne
Schempf walks in and takes
her
place at the black Yamaha baby grand in the
middle
of
the
room, displacmg
some of her
piano
students who are eager to play the
expensive instrument
Mark
Lawlor
enters
the room.
He
spends
a
few
moments laughmg and talkmg with
students and giving his keys to smgmg-club
officers who need to
use
the
office computer.
But when
9:30 strikes, he is all busmess, and
his busmess
1s coaxmg music out of 90 ama-
teur
singers.
For the past two years, the Marist Singers
have struggled to build their club, w11h one
ultimate goal:
to
make
good music. Now
they
are reaping the
rewards
of their work. The
music department, once three small rooms m
a corner
of the
Student Center, has expanded
to
nine rooms;
the choir, once 25 members,
has grown
to more than
100; the band, once
non-existent except at basketball games, has
become a concert band; and the department
boasts
its first artist-in-residence,
Randall
Craig
Fleischer,
conductor of
the Hudson
Valley
Philharmonic.
It all seemed to fall mto place
m September
1994,
when Mark
Lawlor be-
came
head
of
the
music
department.
The first director of the program was
DorothyAnn
Davis.
"It started slowly, but
like
many good programs, it developed through
the years," says
Manst
President Dennis
J.
Murray.
"Today,
we have
a
program that
would stack up against any m the country."
Members
of the choir sang in London m
March
1995.
Over
the
past
two
years, the
singers have performed with the
Hudson
Val-
ley
Ph1lharmomc,
singer Natalie
Merchant,
opera
singer
Rosemarie Freni,
and most
re-
cently
Kenny
Rogers. The singers were mvited
to
perform
w11h
Rogers in
a Poughkeepsie
show, and
their
energy and talent
impressed
the country star.
His
production company
called
Mark
Lawlor a
week
later
and
asked
them
to perform
with Rogers
in
Bethlehem,
Pennsylvania. The ureless choir
traveled
to
and
from Bethlehem m one night.
Just
this
past April, the singers reunited with Freni to
record a CD.
BY
CYLINDA
RICKERT
'96
Country
singer Kenny Rogers
(foreground)
inYited
the
Marist
College
Singers to perform with him twice.
The Marist
Singers performed
music by
composer
and pianist
Nelly Coletti
at
the
dedication
of
the
campus
theatre
named
for
her. The
renoYation
of
the
theatre
was
made possible
by a generous
gift
from
the late
Frank A.
Fusco,
Miss
Goletti's
husband.
27























e,\l.rnpus
life
..............................
.
............................
.
A major
inspiration
for
the department is
Mark
Lawlor. He
first came to
Marist
in 1982
as
an
adjunct faculty member after receiving
his
bachelor's
in
music
from Westminster
Choir
College
and his
master's
in
music
from
Florida
State University. Later he worked
at
West Point
for a number of years. When
DorothyAnn Davis went on sabbatical
in
1992,
Lawlor was hired to
take her place.
Lawlor
is
the
spirit
of
the
choir.
When
members of
the
Liturgical Singers straggled
in
for
their
second
performance
in a
dark
church
in
Spencer, Massachusens, weary
from a
long
bus
trip
and
little
sleep the night
before,
Lawlor
had
a smile on
his
face and a bounce
in
his step.
"These
acoustics are fabulous," he
said. With his
baby daughter
on one arm and
sheaves of
music
on
the
other,
he
ran from
the
choir
to the
microphone
to adjust it
for
the
soloist, then
to
the instrumentalists
to
turn
down
the
monitor
on
the
keyboards. One-
year-old
Katie
was
deposited
on
the
noor
with
a toy,
and
dad
yelled
his
impatient,
ever
familiar
"OK,
people,
let's
go." When
the
dark
silence
was
broken
by
30
voices and eight
instru-
ments blending in har-
mony,
life
came
lO
the
sleeping building.
Like
the
choir,
Marist's band
program has
seen enormous growth.
Under
the
direction of
adjunct faculty member
Master
Sgt.
Arthur
Himmelberger, percus-
sionist
in
the United
States
Military Academy
Band,
the Marist band
has gone
from
two
trumpet
players
and
Himmelberger
on
drums nine
years ago
to
a
60-member concert
band
today.
Himmelberger
at-
tributes
the
growth of
the
band
to
good
student
leadership,
particularly
from
members of
the
fall
1996
incoming
senior
class. The group also per-
forms
as
a
pep band
at
basketball and
football
games, a jazz
band,
a
woodwind
choir,
a nute
ensemble, which
is in-
structed
by
Julie Martyn
Baker, and a brass
choir,
which
is
taught
by John
Thomas. But
Himmel-
berger
says that the
con-
cert
band is the heart of
the
program.
"Everything grows out of
the
concert
band. That's where we
explore
music
that
will make
them grow
as
musicians."
28
Student Brian Coakley
(above)
is one of 60
memben; of the Marist band, which performs
at
athlletic events as well as in concerts.
and the Marist
Singers
Joined
forces with
conduc-
tor Randall Craig Fleischer (right)
and
the Hudson
Valley
Philharmonic
for several
concerts.
Himmelberger.
who earned
his bachelor's
in music
at
the
University
of Michigan
and
his
master's in
education at
Temple
University,
has
extensive experience
with
student bands.
He
developed a
number
of
high
school band
programs and produced
and designed the
half-timeentertainment
at
Army football
games
for
10
years. Yet
he finds Marist
students
exceptional.
"Someone
is doing
something
right
in
the
upbringing of students going
to
Marist. I find
them to be
a special bunch of
kids."
Similarly,
President Murray
says he
never
ceases to
be
amazed by
the
students involved
in
the music
program.
"When they go out
in
the community or
participate
in service activi-
ties,
when they
go out on the road, they're our
ambassadors.
They
are a great group of am-
bassadors to
have out there."
Marist students evidently feel
the
same
way about the
music
program's performers.
This
past
April
the
Student Government Asso-
ciation
honored
the
Marist Singers with its
Club of the Year
award and named the band
Service Club of the
Year.

Cylinda
Rickert
'96,
a journalism major, sang
with the Marist Singers and Chamber
Singers
for
four years. She also served as president of
the
MaristSingers
during her junior and
senior
years
at the College.
Maris!
Magazine















Bro. Nilus Donnelly,
IFMS,
looks
from
Adrian Hall
at
unfinished
Donnelly
Hall,
circa
1959.
Marists
founders
had
a vision.
So
can
~ou.
Vision. Marist's founders hc1d
it, conceiving of a college that 50 years later has provided a meaningful
academic experience for thousands: of students.
You, too, can create a plan for the future that will help the students of tomorrow. It can happen through
a planned gift to Marist College, which can also benefit you and your family.
By remembering Marist in your estate or developing a trust during your lifetime, you can support a
scholarship, an endowed chair or a facility such as Marist's new
library.
In doing so you can honor a loved
one, a family member or your own accomplishments.
The donation of assets such as cash, stocks or real estate to Marist, depending on plans arranged
with your financial advisor, can generate an income for you throughout your life, give you a charitable tax
deduction, possibly eliminate paymf~nt of a capital gains tax or reduce estate taxes for your heirs.
Perhaps most important, yo,ur generosity will make a lasting impact on many lives. What you plan
today will help provide the best edu,cation possible
for
future generations of Marist students.
And providing for tomorrow
iis
what vision is all about.
For
Information
about
planned
giving opportunities
at
Mar/st,
please contact Shal/een Kopec,
Vice President
for
College
Advancement,
at
(914)
57$31000,
ext. 2412.













MARIST
C
O
L
L
E
G
E
Office of College Advancement
290
North Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-1387
Address Correction
Requested
YlAQ
OF
Non-Profit Org.
U.S. Postage
PAID
Permit No. 34
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