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Summer
2001
Red Foxes
R111le!
A Banner Year
for the College
Includes an
Extraordinary
Gift for Marist's
Future

magazine





































1ST
CONTENTS/
Summer
6
Visionary Benefactors
An extraordinary
gift
from Ellen and Jason
Hancock
launches
a center for exploring
new
technologies
13
Stellar Students
Marist continues to attract
the most
academically
talented
applicants
in
its history,
thanks
to
a
growing
national reputation
14
Winning Faculty
Three professors are awarded prestigious
federal grants
that
will advance research
and
enhance
student
learning
16&20
Acclaimed Alumni
Two of
Marist's
best-known alumni make news
as
Bill
O'Reilly
'71
scores a
best-selling
book
and top
cable
TV
news
show and Rik
Smits
'88
retires
after
12
seasons
in
the NBA
24
League Leaders
The Red
Foxes win the Metro Atlantic
Athletic Conference's
highest ho,wr,
the
Commissioner's
Cup,
for
overall excellence
-for
an
unprecedented
third
straight
year
M11rist
Magazine
is
published
by 1he Office of
College
Advancement a1 Maris1
College for alumni,
friends, facuhy and
staff of Maris1 College
Editor:
Leslie Bates
Vice
President for
College Advancement:
Shaileen
Kopec
Associate Vice
President/Direcwr
of
Development:
Roben West
Chief College
Relations
Officer:
Tim Massie
Director
of
Alumni
Affairs: Sean
Morrison
Alumni Notes Coordina1or:Jo-Ann Wohlfahrt
An
Director:
Richard
Deon
Maris1
College, 3399 Nonh
Rd., Poughkeepsie,
NY 12601-1387
www.marist.edu

editor@marist.edu
Cover
photo
©Digital Vision
2001
jRed
Foxes
Rule!
It was a banner year for
Marist College thanf1s to the
outtstanding achievements of
al:umni, faculty and students
and the great generosity of
a trustee and her husband.
Visionary Benefactors
Page 6
Stellar Students
Page 13
Winning Faculty
Page
14
Acclaimed Alumni
Page
16
&
20
League Leaders
Page 24
FEATURES
8
Linux on Campus
Marist, with
IBM
as a partner,
plunges
into
the
world of Linux
IO
Scholarly Pursuits
A
look at
some of those who were
helped
by
the McCann Foundation's 33-year
tradition
of supporting sdwlarships at Marist
12
Remembering
Anne E. Dyson, M.D.
An
appreciation of a steadfast friend to
the
college
who exemplified
the
Marist
ideal
of service
19
Fontaine Hall Opens
The School of Liberal Arts gets a new home
at the north
end
of campus
23
Hudson Valley Heritage
A new book collects professors'
essays
about their home place
27
E-Wheeling
Joel
Martinez
'03
blends
cycling
and cyberspace
DEPARTMENTS
2
Marist Drive
A
look
at who's
in the
news
and
what's
happening
011
campus
28
Alumni Notes
News of Marist graduates
52
In Closing
A
/if
e-sized statue
011
campus commemorates
the
life
of Saint Marcel/in Champagnat,
the f ou11der
of the Marist Brothers
































:MARIST
D
I
NEWS
&:
NOTES
FROM
THE
CAMPUS
Taking Language Students
Beyond Classroom Walls
W
hile sining in Dr. Kevin Gaugler's Span-
ish
class,students mighuourthe Prado
Museum
in
Madrid.
They
might also browse
the
menu of a restaurant
in
Mexico, watch
video of a CTamenco
dancer or study
the
schedule of
trains
from
Malaga to
Seville.
The technical resources of the new Dr.
Raymond F. Weiss Multimedia Language
Center allow all this and more. The center,
which opened
last
fall within Marist'sJames
A. Cannavino Library, supports instruction
and
research
in foreign languages, foreign
cultures and
international
studies across
the
curriculum.
The
concept
behind
the
center
is to
send students
beyond the
tradi-
tional
walls of a classroom. The center's 20
computers allow students
to
travel and study
via the World Wide Web, access audio and
video
material
and even
to
write in Japa-
nese, Chinese,
Russian
and Arabic.
The
center
not
only hosts
language
classes
dur-
ing the day
but also opens for individuals to
use each evening.
The
language center is
named
for a
popular faculty member,
Dr.
Raymond
Weiss, who graduated from Marist
in 1949
and returned in
the late
1950sasa professor
of Spanish and launched
the
Department of
Modern Languages. Classical
languages
had
already been a
part
of
the
curriculum for
years;
Latin
was well-ensconced
from
the
college's
roots
as an institution that pre-
pared young men
LO
enter
the
Catholic
teaching
order of
Marist Brothers.
Bro.
Jo-
seph Robert,
FMS
taught Latin
full-time in
2
MARIST
MAGAZINE
At
left, ,columns and
statues
in
Madrid.
Teclrnolo,gy
in
the Dr. Raymond
F.
Weiss
Multimedia Language Center
(top),
which
opened
last
fall
withi,1
tl1e James
A.
Cannavino
Library, supports
instruction
a,1d
rese.circh inf
oreign
languages,
foreign
cultures and
international
studies across
the
curriculrnm.
President Dennis
Murray (far
left)
and
Professor
Emeritus of Modern
Languag,es
Maurice
"Mo"
Bibeau (far right)
welcome,d
Jack Weiss
to
the
dedication of
the
language
center,
named in honor
of
l1is
brother,
a popular
Spanish professor
who
launched!
the Department of Modern Lan-
guages at Marist.
the
1950s and
'60s,
and Laurence Sullivan
took over for the next several
decades.
Dr.
Weiss was soon
joined in
promoting the
more modern
languages
by Bro.
Joseph
Belanger,
FMS, who came to Marist in 1959.
The
dedication
of
the
center this past
fall offer,ed an opportunity for colleagues
and alumni
to
remember
the
late Raymond
Weiss. At
the
gathering, Professor Emeritus
Maurice
"Mo" Bibeau noted the great inCTu-
ence Dr. Weiss had on
fellow
faculty and
students. Marist ties with
the
Weiss family
remain:
Dr. Weiss's brother.Jack, and sev-
eral of his nieces and
nephews
attended the
dedication, and
his
sisters, Catherine and
Margaret., continue
to
pro\·ide generous
support for the Dr. Raymond Weiss Memo-
rial Scholarship Fund at Marist.
New York State Grant
to Support Innovative
E-Business Center
M
arist College has taken a leadership
role
in helping
area
businesses
take
advantage of
the
lnternet
through its new
E-
Business
Center. Nearly $400,000
in
grants
will enable
Marist
to assist companies
in
developing new products
and services,
streamlining operations
to
use new tech-
nology, improving
marketing
and expand-
ing
sales and
purchasing
strategies to reach
new
markets.
Gov. George Pataki
has designated
a
$250,000 grant
to
support the new center.
New
York
State Sen. Stephen M. Saland
announced
the
grant award
in
February.
Senator Sa
land previously
secured S 140,600
to
help
purchase
materials and equipment
for the center.
"Two of our greatest strengths are
our
exceptional colleges and our great potential
for
high-tech business
growth," said Sen.
Saland, who
represents
Poughkeepsie.
"This
center offers an
ideal
location
to
merge
our
promising
business with a great college.
I
have
been
proud
LO
offer
my
support to the
center since
it
opened this fall."
The E-Business Center will provide
instruction to
businesses on utilizing
the
Linux
computer operating system, which is
used in the
development
of e-commerce
applications.
The
center will also serve as
a meeting place for conferences and trade-
related seminars.
Sen.
Stephen
M.
Saland
(right),
a longtime
supporter of
education
and
business
devel-
opment,
Joined
Marist
President Dennis
Murray
at a recent
event.
Senator Saland
has
secured
key f undingfor tl1e new
E-Busi-
11ess
Center
011
the
Poughlieepsie
campus.

























Timothy G. Brier '69 Joins
Marist's Board of Trustees
T
imothy
G. Brier '69 has
been
elected
to
the
Board of Trustees of Marist College.
Based in
London,
Mr. Brier is chairman
of priceline.com Europe. He
is
a co-founder
and former executive vice
president
of U.S.
-
based priceline.com, the "name your own
price"
Internet
commerce system, and
former president of Priceline
Travel.
Tim Brier
'69,
chairman of
priceline.com
Europe,
l1as
joined
Marist's
Board
of
Trustees.
An Internet, technol-
ogy and
travel
services vet-
eran, Mr. Brier worked in
the airline
industry
for
22
years before co-founding
priceline.com
in
1997.
Prior
to
priceline.com,
he was president of CAP
Systems, a U.S. company
that
provides affinity and
customized
marketing
programs
to the travel
industry. From
1990
to
1995
he was vice president
of marketing for Continen-
tal Airlines. Earlier he was
vice president of market
planning
for Pan American
World Airways and vice
president of marketing for TWA. While at
TWA
he
was managing
director
for
the
airline's operations in Ireland and the United
Kingdom.
After graduating from Marist with a
major
in
business and economics, Mr. Brier
earned an M.B.A.
at
Harvard
Business School
in 1975.
He and his wife,
Patricia,
have
three
children.
Books Tell a Tale
of Generosity
M
any new
books in
r ·
..
,
Marist's
James
A.
-
-
Cannavino Library
now
bear a
personal touch.
·
Alumni, faculty, staff
and friends of Marist who
contributed
to the
capital
campaign for the Cannavino
Library were
invited to
sub-
mit a name
to
be printed on
a special bookplate. The
plates
have been placed
in new books
acquired by
the
library since it
opened in the fall of 1999.
"The commemorative bookplates hav
proved
to
be a wonderful way to incorpo-
rate
all
donors
into
the
library," says Shaileen
Kopec,
vice president for college advance-
ment.
"For
years to come, Marist students
will open
these books
and realize
that their
opportunity to study
in
such a magnificent
building was
made
possible
through
the
generosity of thousands of people who were
committed
to
Marist."
The chair of Marist's Board of
Trustees,
Rob Dyson, and his wife,
Emilie,
were
among
five
individual's
honored for humanitarian
service
by the
Eleanor
Roosevelt
Center at
Val-Kill.
The
center
presented medals to the Dy sons
(second
and third
from
left)
as well as (left
to
right) ope:ra star and health and
youth
advocate Jessye
Norman, actor and
Tibet
activist
Richard Gere and Brazilian
First
Lady Ruth
Cardoso.
Humanitarian Award for Mr. and Mrs. Rob Dyson
The
chair of Marist's Board of Trustees,
I
Rob
Dyson,
and his wife, Emilie, were
among five
individuals honored
by
the
Eleanor R,oosevelt
Center at Val-Kill during
its most recent annual awards ceremony.
The
Eleanor
Roosevelt Center at Val-
Kill,
located in
Hyde
Park,
NY., annually
awards medals to individuals who exem-
plify former First
Lady
Eleanor Roosevelt's
humanitairian spirit and contribute to soci-
ety in areas such as education, the ans,
Above,
librarian Judy Diffenderfer
affixes
bookplates in the Franli
A. Fusco
Reading
Room of tl~e James
A. Cannavino Library.
community service or philanthropy.
For decades, Rob Dyson, chairman and
CEO of
the
Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corp.,
has
played
a
leadership
role in the major
institutions
in
Dutchess County. Currently,
he is chairman ofMarist's Board of Trustees
and has been on the board since 1975. He
also serves on the boards of Cornell Univer-
sity and
Health
Quest Systems, Inc.,
the
parent
board
of Vassar Brothers and North-
ern Dutchess hospitals. He is heading a
coalition of community leaders actively
promoting Dutchess County as the location
for New York State's proposed Rivers and
Estuary
Institute.
Mr. Dyson is also presi-
dent
of the Dyson Foundation, which has
awarded numerous grants impacting a
variety of organizations in
the
Hudson
Valley and nationally that are dedicated to
medicine and health, social services, higher
education and the arts.
Active with a number of community
organizations, Emilie Dyson isa well-known
advocate for children and families and
created the
innovative
learning center
known as the
Reading
Barn. As president
of the board of Family Services,
Inc.
for
eight years, she was instrumental
in
estab-
lishing
the Family Partnership Center in
Poughkeepsie, a unique facility housing
more
than two dozen agencies and pro-
grams offering services to city residents.
She also co-founded the Mid-Hudson
Valley's largest educational event,
the
annual Kids' Expo. Kids' Expo is just one
example of the Dysons' hands-on approach
to
community service; they have been
familiar faces in the trenches at the Expo
each year, hanging banners and setting up
booths alongside other volunteers.
SUMMER
2001
3

















I
least
22 years old who already have earned
60 college credits. Twenty adults at a time
begin the
program,
attending a four-hour
class one night or Saturday each week, year-
round, for two years. Students and faculty
interact outside of class via
Internet
discus-
sion groups. Courses last six weeks, and
students graduate with a Marist College
bachelor of science
degree
in
integrative
studies. The initial cohort is being taught by
the same full-time faculty who
teach
on
Marist's Poughkeepsie campus.
The program removes all the obstacles
that non-traditional students
usually
face,
says Dr. John De Joy, assistant
dean
for
external affairs and director of the program.
Course registration,
financial
aid and pay-
ment of tuition
is
all handled at one orien-
tation session.
The
college bookstore ships
the necessary textbooks to each student.
"Our
students
never have
to wait in line for
anything," he says. "It's a very supportive,
collaborative environment."
Marist's Fisl1l1ill
Center,
11ewly located
at
400 Westage l3usiness
Center
Drive in
Fisl1hill,
offers a new adult bachelor's
completion
program as
well
as undergraduate and
graduate
courses
and professional
trai11ing.
Marist's commitment to working adults
dates
tO
March 1959
when the college
launched an evening
division.
Today. more
than 1,700 adult students take Maristclasses
each year.
Marist Expands Its Commitment to Adult Education
For more
information
about the Fishkill
Center. seewww.Marist.edu/adulted/
or call
(845) 897-9648. For information about the
Organizational Leadership and Communi-
cation program, see www.marist.edu/olc
or
call Julie Taylor at (845) 575-3800.
M
arist's
latest
commitment
to
serving
the commuting student and working
professional
is an entirely new extension
center facility in Fishkill, N .Y .• 14
miles
south of
the
main campus in Poughkeepsie.
The center's most
recent
offering is a user-
friendly
program
that allows working adults
to complete a
bachelor's
degree in two years
while
taking
only one class at a time, only
one night a week.
Marist opened its Fishkill Center
this
past
academic year at 400 Westage Business
Center Drive, off
Route
9 at Exit 13 on
Interstate 84. The
10,000-square-foot
center offers
undergraduate
and graduate
courses as well as professional training in
its classrooms and computer
labs,
which
are linked
tO
all of the digital resources
available on the
main
campus. The center
offers courses
during
the evenings Monday
through Thursday, during
the day
on Satur-
day and
in
some cases on Sunday.
At Fishkill students can work t0ward
bachelor's degrees and certificates
in
integrative studies, human
resources
management, social work, paralegal studies
and information systems. Master's programs
available
include the M.B.A.
and
the
graduate
certificate
in
elementary education leading
to a provisional New York State teaching
certificate. Professional
development
offerings include a
financial
planning
certificate and Emerging Technology
Training,
formerly known
as the Cyber
Skills Institute, which offers non-credit
certification
training in
various Web and
Internet technologies.
4
MARIST
MAGAZINE
A
new
Organizational Leadership and
Communication program,
launched
this
past spring by the School of Graduate and
Continuing Education, is open to adults at
Community Leaders Honored by Marist
For the
J:3'
4
year,
Marist l1as recognized
outstanding community
service
with
awards pre-
se11ted
to tl1ree i11dividuals.
Left to right,
Preside11t
Dennis Murray presented the 2000
Marist
College President's
Award
for
Co111mu11ity
Service
at the a1111ual
Connmrnity
Breallfast, held
i11
tl1e
Cabaret
011
campus. Abel
Garragltan,
cltair111a11
a11d
preside11t of Heritagenergy,
was
comme11ded
for actively pro111oti11g
rei11vestme11t
i11
the Hudson
Valley's
former industrial
centers.
JLi11da
Saland was
recognized for
a long record of
co111111u11ity
service with
many
organizatio11s.
Robert Watson, Sr.
'881'92,
superintendent
of the Poughheepsie
City School
District,
was
honored for his
commitment
to
educatio11
in
the City
of
Poughlieepsie.























Lorraine Bolivar '01
won
the
award for
Outstanding
Gannent,
modeled by je,mifer
Edwards
'02 (above),
at
the
Marist
Silver
Needle
Awards
and
Fashion
Show.
Talen1t Show
A
record-setting 13 senior fashion design
majors presented their collections
dur-
ing the Silver
Needle
Fashion Show and
Awards,
1.he
Marist Fashion
Program's
l 5
th
annual showcase of student talent held April
2 7 at the Casperkill Country Club in
Poughkeepsie. The
two
shows drew nearly
1,200
people.
The
production
involved more
than
125
students as models, ushers, dressers and
more. Among the hardest-working were
members of
the Fashion
Show Production
class. The:y arranged seating, handled
ticket
sales, oversaw catering setups and sold ads
for the event program.
The
show won rave reviews under
the
leadershitD
of Heather Osgood,
director
of
the Fashion
Program,
who served as pro-
ducer. Faculty
also
played
a
major
role in
the production. Richard
Kramer
was show
director
and designer while Sue DeSanna
was fashion
director,
in charge of
the
senior
design students, their garments and
the
models. Lydia
Biskup
successfully arranged
for generous
donations
of
jewelry,
belts,
socks, sunglasses and perfume for gift bags.
Richard Kramer
and Stan Lichens
designed
the
show's poster and
its
program,
for which
photography professors
Dan
McCormack
andjamei; Luciana
provided digital photog-
raphy
expertise.
As in the
past,
the senior design stu-
dents
worked
directly
with professionals
from design houses to
improve
and perfect
their collections.
This
year's designer-
critics
came
from
Tommy Hilfiger,
Dana
Champagnat Lecture Series
Complements Catholic Studies Program
M
aristcontinues
to
honor its roots, most
recently
with
two programs that
focus
on Catholicism as a dynamic discipline.
The
second annual Saint Marcellin
Champagnat Lecture in Catholic Studies
this
past
April featured noted religion writer
Dr.
Peter
Steinfels. His talk, "The Crisis
Ahead American Catholicism
in
2025,"
drew
several hundred listeners to
the
Nelly
Goletti Theatre.
Dr.
Steinfels maintained that current
data and
research
on the
decline
in voca-
tions
to
the priesthood as well as
in
the
"saliency"
of their
religion
among younger
Catholics justified the claim that a crisis in
American Catholicism was imminent. He
stressed that a crisis could
mean
opportu-
nity as well as danger.
But he
cautioned
that
the stalemate
between liberals
and conser-
vatives over
theological
and
moral
issues
was
distracting
Catholics
from
addressing
the crisis.
The Saint Marcellin Champagnat
Lecture
in Catholic Studies is
named
for
Father
C:hampagnat,
the
founder
of
the
Marist Brothers, who
was canonized by
Pope
John
Paul
II in April
1999.
Dr. Steinfels
was
the senior
religion
correspondent for the
New
York
Times
from
1988
to
1997
and
writes a
biweekly
col-
umn for
the
Times
called "Beliefs." He
is
a
visiting
professor
of history
at Georgetown
University.
The
ongoing lecture series complements
the Catholic Studies
program,
one
of 14
minors
available
to
students pursuing de-
grees
in Marist's
School of Liberal Arts. The
interdisciplinary
Catholic Studies minor is
designed to
provide students with a histori-
cal and
th,eological
foundation in the
tradi-
tions
of Catholic Christianity. Dr.
Robert
Lewis,
chair of the
English
Department,
coordinates the
minor in
Catholic Studies.
Buchman
and Halston, among others.
Honors presented to senior fashion stu-
dents
included the
award for Most Out-
standing Collection, which went
to Jennifer
Sheedy
'O
l for
her
line,
"Eclectic
Tribe."
Best Garment was awarded
to
Lorraine
Bolivar
'01,
whose collection was called
"Fire
and Ice," and Erika Switzer
'01
re-
ceived the award for Outstanding Fashion
Merchandising Major. Several other stu-
dents received scholarship awards.
-Colleen Byrnes '01
President Dennis Murray
(second
from left)
was among
those
welcoming Dr. Peter
Steinfels
(second
from rig/it)
to
Malist to
deliver tlte
second annual
Saint Marcellin
Cltampagnat Lecture
in
Catl,olic
Studies at
Marist in
April.
Robert Lewis (far riglit),
associate professor
of
English
and cliair of
tlte
English
Department,
coordinates
tlte
Catholic
Studies minor at
Marist.
Bro. Jo-
seph
L.R. Belanger,
FMS
'48
(far
left), pro-
fessor
emeritus of French,
has been
very
active
in
obtainingfinancial
support
for tlte
annual lecture.
SUMMER
2001
5














6
MARIST
MAGAZINE
Visionary Benefactors
Ellen andJason Hancock's
Generosity Sets the Pace
fo1r
Marist's
Future
An extraordinary gift inspires a center
for exploring new technologies
that
will benefit all Marist students.
T
he Marist campus has been buzzing with
the news of an extraordinary gift to the
college and the exciting technology cen-
ter
it
will support.
Marist Trustee Ellen M.
Hancock,
chair-
man and chief executive officer of Exodus
Communications, Inc., and
her husband,
Jason, have committed $5 million toward a
pioneering center at
Mari
st focused on emerg-
ing technologies and their
innovative
applications
to disciplines
across the curricu-
lum.
The
center will have a special emphasis
on research
into technologies that
will impact
education, business, communication and the
ans.
The gift, which Marist President Dennis
Murray announced
in
a memo
LO
the trustees,
community and special supporters, is the
largest in
the
college's history. Dr. Murray
said
the
Hancocks' leadership gift would be-
come the foundation for Marisl and its
supporters to bring the new center
to
fruition.
"This project
is
a natural progression in
the
advancement of Marist College,"
said Presi-
dent Murray. "We have
the
brainpower of our
faculty and students, the
technology
platform
to
communicate and innovate, and a library
that
provides access
to
sources of information
worldwide. The proposed Hancock Center
for Emerging Technologies will allow our
facuky and students
LO
work
in
a team envi-
ronment across academic
disciplines to
develop
the
next
wave of technology systems,
products
and
leaders
that will impact every
field of study and work." Decisions are s11ll
to
be
made
regarding the design and location of
the center.
"When
I
joined
the
Board of
Trustees
13
years ago, Marist was already in
the
forefront
of integrating
technology
into its curriculum
and operations," said Mrs.
Hancock.
"With
this gift, my husband, Jason, and
I
want
lO
help
keep Marist on the cutting edge while
supporting its
talented
faculty and students m
discovering technologies not
yet on the radar
screen. We also want to recognize Marist's
leadership
and the vision of
its
president,
trustees, faculty, staff and students."
Among
its
state-of-the-an features, the
Hancock
Center is expected
LO
house digital


























"Marist
College
is
a
natural location
for a facility that will be a
laboratory
of ideas for the future. This center will serve as a focal point to understand
emerging
technologies and
h,ow
they will
serve a wide variety
of
fields."
laboratories,
rich
media
development
stu-
dios,
networking
research
labs, high-tech
presentation and screening rooms, collabora-
tive development
space and video
conferencing facilities. Student, faculty and
corporate
research
will
be
undertaken in four
areas central to the advancement of e-busi-
ness:
(1)
Linux
research and
development,
(2)
virtual server
hosting,
(3)
multimedia
stream-
ing and (4)
digital
asset management.
It
is
envisioned that the center
,,.,ill
also serve as an
incubator for new
technology
businesses that
could
be
spun off
by Marist
or external entre-
preneurs.
Both
Mr.
and
Mrs. Hancock
have a special
interest
in higher education. They have gener-
ously
supported Mrs. Hancock's alma mater,
the
College
of New
Rochelle,
and Western
Connecticut
State College, where Mr. Hancock
has served on
the
faculty. Mr.
Hancock
had a
successful career at
IBM
and has
taught
at a
number
of colleges, including Marist, where
he taught as part of
Marist's
special academic
program.
He is
known
nationally for
his
ex-
pertise
in
classical literature,
particularly
Shakespeare and Milton.
"Marist
College is
a
natural location
for a
facility
that will be a
laboratory
of
ideas
for the
future," Mrs. Hancock
said.
"This
center will
serve as a focal
point
LO
understand
emerging
technologies and
how they
will serve a wide
variety of fields. Marist understands that tech-
nology
needs to be incorporated
into
every
academic
discipline
because technology
per-
vades every
profession
students enter," she
said. "Technology
is
changing the way organi-
zations
around the world work, the way
businesses interact
with their customers and
each other, and
the
way government interacts
with
its
citizens. Marist
is
proving how
tech-
nology
is
having
a dramatic impact on the way
teachers educate students."
Dr. Murray
characterized
the
center as
"a
place
for brainstorming and collaboration, a
think tank
that will foster a sense of discovery,
which
is the
cornerstone of
the
teaching and
learning process."
He
stressed
the interdisci-
plinary
nature
of
the
center, noting
that
all
students and faculty at Marist will benefit
from
this
groundbreaking facility. "I know I
speak on behalf of
the
entire college commu-
nity
when
I thank
Ellen and Jason Hancock
for their
vision, their
leadership
and
their
extraordinary generosity."

An Ex:perienced
Tech111ology
Leader
Encouraging Women
To Succeed
E
lien
Hancock
showed her commit-
me1nt to higher education when she
~oined the
Marist
College
Board of
Trustees 13 years ago, pro\'iding
the
fore-
sight
and
keen
understanding that
allowed
Marist to
become widely known
for its use
of technology
both in
and out of the class-
room. Now a
nationally
recognized
technology leader
who was ranked
fifth
on
Fortune
magazine's
most recent list of
the
50
Most
Powerful
Women
in Business,
she
remains an advocate for women's advance-
ment in
:science and technology careers.
Mrs.
Hancock
has
more than 35 years
of experience in
the technology
industry.
After earning a B.A. in
mathematics
from
the Colle:ge of New
Rochelle
and an M.A.
in mathematics from Fordham University,
she joined
the
IBM Corp. During her 29-
year care:er there she became senior vice
president and group executive, overseeing
15,000
employees. After
leaving
IBM she
served as executive
vice
president and
chief ope:rating officer for National Semi-
conductor and
then
as executive vice
presidenrt
of research and development
and
chie:f
technology
officer for Apple
Computer.
-Ellen
Hancock
Mrs. Hancock's
tenure at Exodus
be-
gan
in
March
1998
when she was appointed
president. She
took
the company public
shortly
thereafter
and was elevated to chief
executive officer
in September
1998.
Founded
in
1994,
Exodus Communi-
cations is
the
world leader in managing
and supporting Web sites for other busi-
nesses.
With
more
than
4,500
customers,
Exodus manages
its network infrastruc-
ture via a worldwide
network
of 4 2 Internet
Data
Centers.
Mrs. Hancock
has
been called an
in-
dustry star who works
hard to
encourage
women to succeed in
Internet
businesses.
A lengthy No\'ember
2000
profile
in Busi-
ness
Week E-Biz,
"Making
Her
Own Luck,"
described
the
worthy example
she
has
set
for other women:
The Bronx, N.Y., native bucked
convention from
the
start,
devel-
opingan affinity for math and
logic
while attending all-girl Catholic
schools. Unlike many women of
her
generation, Hancock poured
all her energy
into
her career, rap-
idly
climbing IBM's corporate
ladder
LO
become Big
Blue's
first
female senior vice-president.
Hancock,
who is conscious of be-
ing
a
role model
and has mentored
several other women,
draws
acco-
lades
from
female
executives.
"I
have
a
lot
of
respect
for Ellen. She
has
made
it
easier for the rest of
us,"
says
Ruann
F. Ernst, CEO of
Digital Island
Inc. which competes
with
Exodus.
Ellen
Hancock
also regularly wins
accolades from
national publications
for
her
leadership in
the industry.
In
December
Network World
named
her
one of the 25
most
powerful
people
in
networking.
In
2000
Upside magazine
named
her
to
its
annual
ranking
of
the
top
100
technology
leaders who made the most important
contributions
to the digital re\'olution
during
the
previous year.
Vanity Fair
named her one of
50
leaders
of the
"eEstablishment"
last year.

SUMMER
2001
7





BY LESLIE
BATES
8
MARIST
MAGAZINE























































he penguin is the symbol of
the
com-
puter operating system known as Linux.
So
tt
was appropriate that
the
coolest T-
shin at
LmuxWorld
Expo 2001
in
New York
City in January was a black and white one
worn by the students from Marist College.
The shirt had a drawing of an IBM ser\'er
below the
words "My
Linux Box
is Bigger
Than Your Unux Box." Everybody \vho saw
it
wanted one.
Linux has become a worldwide
phenom-
enon. Finnish student Linus Torvalds created
it
in
1991, giving his permission for anyone to
download
its
source code for free. Ever since,
programmers
internationally,
using the
Internet to commumcate, have added to
it,
sharing their enhancements. Widely avail-
able, stable, flexible and
low-cost
to operate,
it has become the fastest-growing operating
system in the world. Marist has become one of
the
most active institutions of
higher
education in
the
Linux
community and will make
Linux research a priority
in
its
new Hancock Center for
Emerging
Technologies.
Marist's mentor in Linux
research and development is
the
IBM Corp., and its "Linux
box"-the computer
it runs
Linux
on-is an IBM S/390
G5
Parallel
Enterprise
Servern
1

IBM recently
launched a major initiative to adopt
Lmux
as
a viable operating system across all of its
hardware products. During 2001 alone the
company will
invest
$1 billion to promote
Linux worldwide, intent on becoming the
world's
premier
source for servers, software
and service fore-businesses built on Linux.
The
number
of such businesses
is
growing
every day.
International
Data Corp. has re-
ported that Linux server shipments last year
grew 24.4 percent, compared with a 20.2
percent growth rate for Microsoft's Windows.
IOC has projected that Linux will grow faster
than all other operating systems combined
through 2003.
Jon "Maddog" Hall, execmive director of
the
nonprofit Linux
International,
outlined
the
explosive growth of Linux in a lecture at
Marist
in
February.
In
May of 1994, 125,000
Linux systems were
in
use, according to Mr.
Hall. In September 1998,
there
were 12
mil-
lion
systems, and in September 1999, the
number had grown to 20 million. Today, 30
million Linux systems are "out there," he said,
noting
that
by comparison Microsoft has li-
censed
450
million of tts systems and
Macintosh, 13
million.
IBM
has
been developing products in
joint
studies with Marist College for 13 years.
So it has been natural for the corporation to
collaborate with Marist in creating and test-
ing Linux applications for its S/390
series.
a
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a1bt
IBM
is
com iuingsubstantial support in both
hardware a
a
software
to
advance Linux re-
search at M ist.
~fanst
s one of the first organizations
outside IBM o run Linux on a large server and
was the fir site in the world to distribute
Linux for
l
S/390. Marist staff, faculty and
undergradu te students use Linux on the
S/390 for a ariety of applications. Marist is
taking adva tage of Linux's ability to support
streaming
dia, technology that allows us-
ers
to
receiv ound and video over the Internet
in real
time. creaming
media projects
include
broadcast
in
the college
radio
station. WMCR,
and
basket
II games on the Internet. The
college plan to enhance the streaming audio
and video al ady offered
in its
digital library
with Lmux. arist, which works on
the
FOR
Presidential ibrary's Web site, will use Linux
to expand
t
t site's audio and video offerings
as well.
Linux-b ed research at Marist will also
focus on vi
al servers, wherein one server
can act
like
f
ny, saving space and money on
everything
f
m the cost of electricity to run
and cool m iple PCs to the cost of cables to
connect the . The Marist College Institute
for Public Opinion
is testing applications for
measuring public opinion using both Lmux
and virtual servers on the S/390. Marist also
has rolled out a
Linux-based
Web-mail
inter-
face for students, and Linux has become part
of the computer science curriculum. Harvard
Ph.D. Dan Marcellus teaches a class in Linux,
and more courses are planned. At
the
same
time, Linux supports day-to-day administra-
uve functions in the college's Information
Technology department.
Marist is doing its part to nurture the
Lmux worldwide phenomenon by hosting an
electronic
discussion
group dedicated co
Linux
for the S/390. Subscribers receive more than
50 e-mail messages a day from the list, accord-
mg to the listowner,
Harry
Williams, director
of technology and systems at Marist. After
starting in December 1998 with a nucleus of
about 50 subscribers, membership has reached
1,200 and continues to grow.
Recent messages among the group indi-
cate
more
enthusiasm for
Linux
than ever.
"There's
a level of excitement
in their
e-mail
that
1 haven't heard in a long time," says Harry
Williams.
Or, as Jon "Maddog" Hall put it, "There's
a tidal wave coming."

Marist
was
one
of the first
organizations
outside
IBM
to run
linux
on a large
server
and
was
the first
site
in th111
world
to distribute
linux
for the S/390.
SUMMER
2001
9





















Scholarly Pursuits
McCann Scholarships
Se:rve
Marist Students
f
o~r
Three Decades
Honoring the wishes of its founder,
the McCann Foundation carries on a
vital scholarship program that over
the years has provided $1.6 million
in support of Marist students
from the local area.
J
ames Mccann
had
only one plan for the
$17 million estate he would
leave.
He told
his executor
he
wanted
to
establish a foun-
dation to benefit the community, especially
the
young
people
who auended
the
high
school in his
neighborhood.
Born and raised
in
Poughkeepsie, Mr.
McCann
lived
simply,
in
a house on North
Hamilton
Street across
from
Our Lady of
Lourdes High
School.
He ran
a
feed
and grain
store dov.rntown
while quietly investing
in the
stock market.
After
he
passed away
in 1969,
his execu-
tor,
John
j.
Gartland,
Jr., began to
carry out
Mr. McCann's wishes. When he
learned
that
some of
the
Lourdes students, although they
had
top
grades, could not afford
higher
edu-
cation, he arranged for McCann estate funds
to help
those
students attend Marist College.
That was
the
start of a tradition that con-
tinues
today. For
the 33
rd
consecutive year,
the
McCann Foundation has provided $50,000
in scholarships
to
help students from Dutchess
County attend Marist College. The founda-
tion
also funds scholarships
for local
young
people
to
Bard, Vassar and
Dutchess
Commu-
nity colleges. Over
the past
l
O
years, 6 7
Marist students
have received
McCann aid.
Since
its
inception in 1969, the McCann Foun-
dation has provided $1.6 million
in
scholarship
support for hundreds of students designated
McCann Scholars at Marist.
Ernest Arico '76, a senior copy editor and
online
editor at
Florida
Today
in Melbourne,
Fla., was one of the early
recipients,
receiving
an award in 1972.
He
was a senior at Our
Lady
of Lourdes
High
School when his guidance
counselor suggested
he
apply.
''Without
this
scholarship
I
would
never
have been able to
go to a four-year college," he says.
"My
family
was living on a very
tight
budget
in
the Italian
section of Poughkeepsie
and
never
thought
that going
to
college would
be
a
possibility
for
me. But
the McCann
Scholarship
changed all
that. To
this
day,
I
am
the
only member of the
Rashida Be1111ett
'01
is pursuing a master's
i11
psychology and community
counseling at
Marist.
Arico family who
has
graduated
from
a four-
10
MAR I ST MAG AZ I N E
































To Ernest
Arico,
the McCann
Scholarship made all the
difference.
"I
owe
all
of my
accomplishments in life to that
scholarship.
It opened the door
for me
to
reach the
goals
I
set to
achieve."
year institution."
Today,
inspired by
former
Marist
communications
professor
Bob
Norman,
he
teaches college courses in televi-
sion production in addition
to
editing
Florida
Today.
He is
one of many McCann Scholars who
have
gone on to
meaningful
careers.
Eileen
Bernhardt
'98
and
her
brothers, Tom Bubel
'92,
and
Joe
Bubel
'90,
were also
Lourdes
graduates
who received
McCann Scholarships.
Eileen and
Tom
went on
to
earn
master's
degrees in
education and are now
teachers,
Eileen at Our
Lady
of
the
Assumption in the
Bronx,
N.Y., and
Tom
in
Millbrook
Central
Schools
in
Millbrook, N.Y. Joe
is
a program-
mer at
the IBM
Corp. in
Poughkeepsie.
"Marist
was a lot cheaper in those
days,"
Joe jokes.
Still, without
the
scholarship,
he
says, "I wouldn't
have been
able
to
goto MarisL"
Ernest
Arico
'76
is
a senior copy editor
and
online
editor
at Florida Today and teaches
college
cow'ses
in
Melbourne,
Fla.
John Killian
'89
is vice
president
and
head
of controlling
for
North American OTC De-
rivatives for
Deutsche Bank. He
is also enrolled
in
the executive M.B.A.
program
at Columbia
University. "As a
full-time
student at Marist
College,
I
worked nearly
full-time
at
Dutchess
Bank because
I could not afford
the
tuition,"
he remembers.
"The
McCann Scholarship
helped me
l<O
not only graduate without
loans,
I
was able
to
balance work and school, gradu-
ate with honors and get
recruited
right off
Mattliew Boyd
'02,
a business and finance and
international business major, liopes
to
attend
law
scliool after graduation.
campus by Arthur Andersen and Company. I
don't know
if
all of
that
would have
been
possible without the
McCann Scholarship."
Awilda Velez '94f95 continued her post-
graduate education at
Marist,
earning a master
of arts
in
counseling/community psychology
and
then
a certificate of advanced study
in
school
psychology.
Now a certified school
psychologist, she works in
the
Newburgh
Enlarged City School District in Newburgh,
N .Y. In her spare
time
she helps
run
an annual
golf
tournament
that
benefits
a college
schol-
~
arship fund for local high school students.
!z:
"Being
a scholarship recipient," she says,
"I
0
understand the
importance of creating oppor-
§
tunities for students
to furthertheireducation."
i
Marist students who received McCann
Scholarships
this past
semester share
their
predecessors' drive
to
achieve.
Rashida
Bennett
'0lf02
is pursuing
a
master's in
psychology
and community counseling at Marist. As an
undergraduate
psychology major, she wok
part in
the
Psychology
Club and Gender Equal-
ity
Club and volunteered with the Peer Support
Line. The
McCann support, she says,
really
helped her
because "without
that
scholarship,
I
probably wouldn't
have
graduated."
Matthew Boyd '02, a
business
and finance
and international
business
major, hopes
to
attend
law
school after graduation. He is ac-
tive
at
Marist in
Global Outreach, Campus
Ministry
and the Alpha Phi Delta
fraternity.
"This scholarship represents the caring spirit
that
I
see alive
today
in
the
classrooms as well
as
the
extracurricular activities at Marist Col-
lege,"
he says.
"It
has
truly allowed me to
take
full advantage of everything that Marist has
lO
offer."
To
Ernest
Arico,
the
McCann Scholarship
made
all
the difference.
"I
owe all of
my
accomplishments in life
lO
that scholarship. It
opened the
door for me
lO
reach
the
goals
I
set
lO
achieve."

Jolm]. Gartland, Jr.
(right) serves as
president and his
son,
Michael, is
vice
president
of
the
McCann Foundation, which
has
generously supported
McCann
Scholarsliips
for
students at
Marist for
33 years. The
McCann
Foundation
also
supports students
from Dutcl,ess
County,
N.
Y.,
in attending Bard, Vassar
and
Dutcl,ess
Community colleges.
Reported
by Kimberly
Honsinger
'01
and Jennifer
Salerno '01
SUMMER
2001
11


























Dreaming Grand Dreams-
and Making Them Come True
Marist awarded
Anne E.
Dyso,1,
M.D.
a11
lionorary
Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 1999.
Through the Dyson Foundation,
Anne
Dyson, M.D., enriched the learning
experience for every Marist student.
T
oday,
Marist
College offers
first-class
facilities and enjoys a stronger academic
reputation
than ever before. The college's
great success
is
due
in
pan
to the
generosity
and active involvement of one of
its
major
benefactors,
the
Dyson
Foundation. The Marist
community was deeply saddened by
the
news
of
the untimely
death of
the
president of
the
foundation,
Anne E.
Dyson,
M
D., this
past
fall
following a courageous battle
with
breast
cancer. Under
her
leadership
the foundation's
commitment
to
improving
the
Hudson
Valley
and
its
institutions
has made
a
huge impact
on
the college.
"We
have
lost a good friend and a fine
lady,"
said
Marist
President
Dennis
Murray.
"But her good work will
live
on for
many
generations."
Both Dr. Dyson
and
her
brother,
Robert
R
Dyson, have
been
dedicated supporters of
Marist.
Rob
Dyson has seen
to the
forward
movement
of
the
college
throughout
his
26
years as a
member
of
the
college's Board of
Trustees
and particularly
through his service
as
the board
chair since 1994. Anne
Dyson,
as
president
of
the
Dyson Foundation, has been
responsible
for
providing
exceptional sup-
port
that
has been
integral to the
college's
development over the
past
two decades.
The
Dyson Foundation's
generous gifts to
Marist over the years
made possible
the con-
12
MA R
I
ST
M AG AZ
I
N E
struction of sorely
needed academic
facilities.
The
Dyson
Center,
named for
Anne and Rob
Dyson's
parents,
Charles
and
Margaret,
and
the James
A.
Cannavino
Library
were each
built
with
a
Dyson
Foundation gift as a major
cornerstone. Each
of these buildings
was ex-
traordinary
for its
technology
infrastructure
and could be counted among the
best
facilities
available on any college campus
in
America.
And each student's opportunities for learning
grew because of the vision of Anne and Rob
Dyson.
Supporting
a
New
Library
This strong commitment to advancing aca-
demics at
the
college
has
come to
fruition
as
Marist now attracts the
most
talented fresh-
man classes in its
history,
in part because of its
outstanding facilities.
In
particular, when
the
dream
of
building a
new
library for Marist
began to
come alive, the
Dyson
Foundation
stepped forward
with an important
gift and
challenge grant
that
paved
the
way
for
a
successful fund-raising campaign.
The Dyson
gift supported the
library's
popular
£.
Scriptorium, where students use its work
stations, scanners and printers
night
and
day.
and where
a plaque
signed
by
Anne Dyson, as
president of
the foundation,
honors Rob Dyson
for outstanding
service to the college and the
Hudson Valley community. Through its li-
brary
gift, especially, the
Dyson Foundation
has
enriched
the
learning
experience for every
Marist
student.
The
impact of
the Dyson
Foundation's
support can also be seen
in
Science on the
Move, an
innovative
National Science Foun-
dation-funded
program
based
at Marist since
1997 with a
mission
to significantly advance
science education on the secondary school
level. lt has
as
its
goals
to upgrade
the knowl-
edge and teaching skills of science
teachers;
to
improve
the quality
of the
laboratory
science
experience by providing scientific
instruments
and computer
technology; to improve
stu-
dent performance in
science and
promote
positive
attitudes
toward
science; and
to
de-
velop an electronic communications network
LO
link
teachers
and scientists. Dr.
Dyson
recognized
the
value of
the
program and the
Dyson
Foundation
provided
leadership
fund-
ing
which
has
enabled students in 59
high
schools across New York State's Mid-Hudson
Valley to receive a
richer
education in science.
A
Commitment
to
Service
Dr. Dyson's
interests reached well beyond
the
college. A nationally known pediatrician and
a powerful advocate for children, she served
as chair of the board of the Hole
in
the Wall
Gang
Fund,
Inc.,
which sponsors a camp for
children suffering from cancer or other seri-
ous diseases. She was a trustee and co-chair of
the Partnership for Children of the Academy
of
Pediatrics
and a member of
the
steering
committee of
the
Children's Defense
Fund
in
New York.
She
also served on the boards of
the Joan
and
Sanford L
Weill
Medical
College
and
Graduate
School of
Medical
Sciences of
Cornell University and the
Dana-Farber
Can-
cer
Institute
in
Boston.
In 1999
Marist College acknowledged
Anne
Dyson's
commitment to
helping
others
by
awarding
her
an
honorary Doctor
of
Hu-
mane
Letters
degree
at
its
1999
Commencement. She was
recognized
for re-
llecting
in
all of
her
pursuits
the ideals
of the
college:
dedication
to excellence
in
educa-
tion, to the principle of service and
to
the
pursuit
of
higher human
values.
In
a
letter
in
the
foundation's
most
recent
annual
report, Dr. Dyson
explained
that
what
motivated her was her parents'
legacy
of
help-
ing
others. "Their belief
in
giving back,
in
dreaming
grand
dreams,
and in
leaving
the
world a better place guides
me
every day."
At the
time
of
her death
she
had recently
instituted the
Community Pediatrics Training
Initiative,
a groundbreaking program
designed
to train pediatricians to
have
greater skills and
interest
in
community-based medicine, advo-
cacy and
the
capacity
to
improve
the
well-being
of all children in
their
communities. The
initiative
is destined to become one of
her
many
legacies. Another will
be
the
advance-
ment
of academic quality. The
philanthropy
of
the
Dyson Foundation under Dr.
Dyson's
leadership
has left an indelible
mark
on Marist
College and all of its students.

j
I


















Report from Admissions
First-Rate Freshrnen
For the seventh straight year, Marist
draws the most academically talented
group of applicants in its history.
W
e
have
completed another year at
Marist, enrolling
the
freshman class
of 2001. Fort he seventh straight year,
the
Admissions Office was faced with
the
task
of selecting from
the
most academically
tal-
ented group of applicants
in the
history of
the
college.
More
than
6,250 students applied to
the
college from all over
the
world. Approxi-
mately
3,200 were offered admission
and
950
eventually enrolled for
the
Fall 2001 semes-
ter. This
group of new students represents 31
states and
four
countries. A
majority
of
these
students are
from
the Northeast region, but
inroads
have
been made in several far-reach-
ing
markets,
most
notably Florida,
Jllinois
and California.
l
t has
become
very
apparent
that
the
MarisL
name
is
spreading. During travel and applica-
tion review,
it
became clear
that
we are now
receiving
national
recognition
in several ar-
eas. Rik Smits '88 put Marist on
the
map, and
Bill O'Reilly '71
is keeping us there!
(Please
see
Pages 16 and 20
J
or
more
on these two
newsmakers.-Ed.)
The Marist
College
Institute
for Public Opinion and its polling during
the
recent
presidential
campaign also cast
the
spotlight on Marist.
In
addition, several of our academic pro-
grams are auracting applicants
from all
over
the country. These programs (computer sci-
ence,
information
technology,
information
systems, communications, elementary/special
education and fashion design/merchandis-
ing) are
making
a name for themselves and are
highly sought-after due to our location,
tech-
nology, faculty, internships, program offerings
and
job placement
rates. The success of our
athletics
program-three
straight MAAC
Com-
missioner Cup trophies and the solid
performance of
men's
soccer, tennis and base-
ball,
and men's and women's cross country,
swimming and crew against
nationally
ranked
opponents-has also helped spread the Marist
name.
Finally,
the
exposure we are
receiving
for
ournew James A. Cannavino
Library has
been
worldwide and
has
had a very positive impact
on the college and the Admissions effort in
particular.
The
Cannavino
Library
is a
mag-
nificent
focal point for
the
campus. When
prospective students and their parents tour
BY
SEAN
KAYLOR
'90
&
JAY MURRAY
'91
Sean Kaylor '90
is
Vice President,
Enrollment
Planning
and Admissions,
and jay Murray '91
is Director
of Admissions
at Marist
Vice President for Enrollment Planning and
Admissions Sean Kaylor
'90
(left) and
Director of Admissions jay Murray
'91
at the
Student
Center,
home to the Admissions Office.
this
facility and see the
number
of students
utilizing
this
beautiful study space and state-
of-the-an technology,
they
are
impressed.
This sends a strong
message
and
has
helped
Marist to enroll students with
high
academic
profiles.
The
profile of this year's
freshman
class
has improved
once again. The
average
SAT
went
up 22 points this
year to 114 7 (com-
pared
to
1125
in
2000and
1107 in
1999).
But
composite SAT score
is
not the only way to
measure
quality. We have
enrolled
students
who are leaders
not
only
in the
classroom,
but
also in
the
community and on
the
athletic
field.
The
list
of institutions we compete with
for sllldents also continues to change and
re0ects the caliber of student Marist is attract-
ing.
Our
true
competitors
in
the
private
sector
are
Providence College, Boston University,
Fairfield
University,
Fordham University,
Loyola
College of Maryland and St.
Joseph's
University,
to name
a few. Schools like
SUNY Geneseo, $UNY Albany, University of
Connecticut,
University
of Massachusetts,
University of Rhode Island and University of
Delaware are
the
public schools we overlap
with on a regular basis. We are also starting to
cross applications v.rith Villanova University,
Boston College, Holy Cross and New
York
University more frequently
now
than in the
past.
Our new competition is a direct
re0ection
on our
beautiful
campus,
the hard
work of the
faculty, staff and administration at Marist and,
of course, the success and support of our
alumni.
Marist is making its mark in higher educa-
tion, and we hope all alumni and friends of
Marist are
pleased
with our growth, de,·elop-
ment and continued success.

SU M M E R 2 0 0 I
13












As\istant
Prof
es~o, of
Biology
Ray
Kepner
reuhed
a $220,600 grant f,0111
the
/'-.ational
Aeronautic
and Space Ad111in1soat1on·s
f1:obiology Program
for
a tl11ee-)'ear
stud).
D,.
Kepnc, also
wo11
a
S96,083
grant from the
\/at1011al Sc,ena foundation to purchase
scic11t1fic
instrnmrnt~
to im1,le111cnt
an
integrated undergraduate cducatio11/rcscarch
program
111
microbial ernlo&) at
\fo1ist.
.
l

























Winning Faculty
Marist Faculty Awarded
$700,000 in Fedt~ral
Grants
New grants are enhancing teaching and learning acrioss
the Marist campus.
M
anst faculty from three academic d1v1-
sions
have
received
almost $700,000
in prestigious federal
grants
for
projects that advance research while simulta-
neously ennching the educational expenences
of students.
Assistant
Professor
of
Modern
Languages
Claire
Keith
of the School of
Liberal
Ans
has
been
awarded a
three-year
grant
totaling
$228,
19➔
from the U S. Department of
Education·s rund for the Improvement of
Postsecondary
Education (FlPSE).
In
her
project, undergraduates in Marist
language
classes arc mentoring students at the
\Jewburgh rrce Academ}',
a secondary educa-
tion insmuuon \>,ithin the school system of
the
city of Newburgh, N.Y.
The
contact
is
designed to
expose
the
younger students
to
collegiate
life,
technology, and career possi-
bilities in
International
Studies in the hope
that they
\\111
pursue higher education. At the
same umc,
Marist
facult} are
working
wnh
the high
school
teachers to
develop
material
and strategics
that
will
help the
academy take
advantage of its new computers. Dr. Kenh's
innova11\·e project is using technology in
Marist's new
Raymond
I·.
Weiss
Mulumedia
Language
Center
within
the
James A.
Cannavino
Library.
The center's
two
power-
ful servers offer the necessar)"
space for students
and facult)· to create the multimedia database
supporting the Web sue through which
the
study's
participants
arc communicaung.
Assistant Professor of Psychology Sherr}'
Dingman of the School of Social and Behav-
ioral Sciences has won a one-year grant of
$125,000
from the National Instllutcs of
l Iealth to
study serotonin pathways
in the
brain. Serotonin
is implicated in
a wide
range
of problems including depression, eaung dis-
orders and suscep1ib1ht) 10 addicuons, but
scientists presently
ha\"C
no way
to
new these
pathways in
living
subjects.
Dr.
Dingman's
project
involves
tagging
the
molecule that
turns
into
serotonin and
tracking
II
using
magneuc resonance imaging. She and her
students arc collaboraung with world-class
chemists
Rhys
Thomas and CongYang Guo of
Fayette, Mo., who
built
the
molecule
for
the
project, and
the
Center for Advanced Brain
Imaging
ai
New York State's Nathan S. Kline
Institute
for Psychiatnc Research, one of the
nation's premier
centers for
mental
health
research.
The
Nat10nal Aeronautic and Space
Administrauon's Exobiology Program has
awarded Assistant Professor of Biology
Ray
Kepner
of
the
School of Science and col-
leagues
collaborating
from three
other
instnutions
a $220,600 grant to conduct a
three-year investigauon of viruses that infect
cyanobacteria from Antarcuca and the Cana-
dian
High
Arctic. Cyanobactena
from
these
remote
areas
make
good stud)' subjects
be-
cause they are an evolutionarily primll1\·e
group analogous
to
single-celled forms that
might
be found on extraterrestrial bodies in
our solar system 1f hfe were
to
have occurred
there. Arctic and
Antarctic
habitats
are cold
and also
isolated
from other organisms and
therefore offer condnions most hke those on
other planets and moons. The \JASA funding
also supports student par11c1pauon in
the
effort.
Dr.
Kepner
also has won a grant of $96,083
from the Na1
ional Science Foundation 10 pur
chase new scientific mstruments 10 implement
an
mtegrated
undergraduate education/re
search
program in
microbial
ecology at
Mari
st
and
to
expand research and
research training
m the sciences. The instrumentation includes
an epi0uorescent microscope \\ith dig11al
1magmg
and image analysis capability as well
as cquipmernt
for
microbial identification,
fil-
tration and centrifugation,
microbial
culturing.
and water-qualit)· monitoring. The instru-
mentation
is
a\·ailable 10 all School of Science
faculty
to
belier combine
teaching
with re-
search
in
environmental
microbiology, to
increase opportunities
10 involve
students in
aCt1\·e
learning
exercises. and to tram students
in usmg modern tcchnolog) 10 address rel-
evant scientific questions. Dr Kepner and
student
research
assistants
have
been
using
the equipment over
the
past year, and
three
Marist students wtll employ it this summer 10
work on the NASA project.
'The important thing is that these grants
arc providing opportunities for some of
Marist's students
to
actually
do
research
and
discover
new
things," says Dr. Kepner. "That's
what scienc(• 1s all about! Its an acti\·e, dy-
namic process of exploration
In
addition, Dr.
Kepner
has
received
a
grant of $47,310
for a
one-year study of
the
ecological
role
of nruses in
the I Iudson
River
from the
Hudson
Ri\·er Foundation. The
foundation also ga\·e a $4,250 Tibor T. Polgar
fellowship
1.0
Kathryn
Docherty '01, an
environmental science
major, to
assist
in
the
stud>

Assistant
Professor of Modern
Languages
Claire Keith was mvcnded a three-year grant
of
S228,194
from
the
U.S.
Department
of
Education's Fund
Jo,
tire Improvement of
Postsecondary Education
(FIPSE)
for a project
that
uses the innovative
technology in
Marist's
new
Raymond
F.
Wriss
Multimedia Language
Center
in
the James A.
Canna,ino
Libra').
Above, Dr.
Keith,
bica
Deninger
'OJ
and
Timotl1y Kaulfers
'O
I
worl1 in
the
center.
Assistant Professor
of
Psychology Sherry
Dingman
received a one-yea,
grant
of
S 125,000
from tire
National
Institutes of
Health to
study
serotonin
pat/mays
in the
brain.
Abo,e,
Dr. Dingman
(centn)
and
stu-
dents Jeremy
Hogan
and Laurie Nasl, pause
for a moment
while
at the
annual
meeting of
the An,erican Association for tire
Advancement
of Science
in San francisco.
S LI M ~1 E R 2 0 0 I
15






















1
eno~menon
A best-selling book and a top-rated
TV news program haven't changed
Bill O'Reilly
'71.
I
n
the spring of
1971,
a young
man
who
spent
much
of his college days
playing
football for
the
Red
Foxes
and
stirring
up
the campus
with his
opinion columns
in The
Circle
relaxed
at
his
graduation
ceremony.
The person
whose yearbook
photo had
car-
ried Lhe
caption "Attitudes: Outrageous"
was
bored with the
commencement speaker and
didn't have
any
idea
what he
wanted
to do
with
the
rest
of
his
life.
Thirty
years later, that same man
returned
Lo
a
Marist
commencement ceremony,
only
this
Lime
he had
a
much
larger
role. This time,
the 1,300
graduates of
Marist's
Class of
200 l
sat
and
listened
to
him
give
them advice
for
the
future.
Bill
O'Reilly, class of 1971,
was honored
with
a
Doctor
of
Humane Letters degree
and
served as
Lhe
graduation speaker at
the
college's
55
th
commencement
ceremony on May
19.
"lt's always meaningful
at
a college or
university when
an alum comes back
to
ad-
dress the
graduates,"
Marist
President
Dennis
Murray
said.
"He
went through the
same
experiences, even
though
it was a different
era, as
the
graduates and
has
gone out
into the
world and
been
successful. That means a
lot."
The
former
college kid has come
a
long
way
in 30
years.
His television
show,
"The
O'Reilly
Factor," airs on Fox News Channel
and
is currently the highest-rated cable
news
talk
show in
the
country.
His
second
book, of
the
same
name
as
his
show. spent eight months
on
The
New York
Times Book Review
"Best
Sellers" list,
including 11 weeks
at No.
1.
Since
September, when the book was pub-
lished, he has
been
the
subject
of profiles in
GQ,
Newsweek,
People, The
New York Times,
The
Washington
Post, The
Wall
Street Journal,
New York, New York
Observer,
Newsday
and
the New York
Post. Brill's
Content
named him
one of
the
top
50
journalists in
the country.
BY JEFF DAHNCKE
'01
Marist
Boai·d
ofTmstees Chaimwn
Rob
Dyson
(left) accompanies
Bill
O'Reilly
in
tl1e aca-
demic
procession
at
commencement.
It's
safe
to
say
he has found
some
direction
in his
life.
"When
I was
sitting right where you are
30
years
ago, I had no
idea what
I
was going
to do," O'Reilly told the
graduates sitting in
the
sunshine on
the
campus green. "Every
person on this
earth-every
one
of you-has a
natural talent. You've
got to
find out
what that
is and
then
you
have to
find
a
way to
make
a
living
doing it. That's the
key
to
happiness
in
your
professional life."
O'Reilly's
professional
life
has
brought
him to
52 countries and all 50 states.
He
has
won two Emmy awards
for
reporting
excellence, and his candid style that
has
made
"The
O'Reilly Factor" such a
success caused The Wall Street Jour-
nal
to say he is
"changing
the
landscape
of the cable-TV
news
busi-
ness."
Still, O'Reilly doesn't
think
much
has changed about him since
1971.
'Tm
fundamentally
the same
person
I
was at Marist, with
the
same
point of view.
I'm
very outspoken and I
was outspoken
back then," he
said. "I still
have
the same sensibility
that I've
always
had,
which is blue-collar,
working-class sensibil-
iLy, and
that's
why
I'm
successful."
O'Reilly gave
the
Class of
2001
a
formula
for being successful
Lhemselves,
Lelling
Lhem
Lo be honorable,
to seL goals and to
remain
deLermined. "This is
your
day today.
This is
your
accomplishment.
Be proud
of yourself.
You
did it. Your
mom didn'L do it.
Your
roommaLe
didn'L
do it. You did
it,"
O'Reilly
said. "I chose
to
stay
in touch
with Marist
College because
l knew
it was a good
place.
Some of you will, some of you won't. The ones
who
don't
are making a mistake. Stay in
touch
with your college. Stay
in touch
with people
who care about you. There are very few of
them.
"Your
parents
and the
fine
people
here
at
Marist
have provided
an opportunity for you
to
build a foundation. You can do what
I
did.
You can do beyond what I did."
In
1971, O'Reilly
didn't
know what he
wanted
to
do. He took a job teaching at
Monsignor
Pace
High School, a school run by
Marist Brothers in the Miami area.
Two
years
later
he went
back
to
college at Boston Univer-
sity and earned a
master's
degree
in broadcast
journalism.
And so the O'Reilly
phenomenon
began.
Stints at several television
stations
through-
out
the
country led him to a
reporting
position
with
the
CBS
neLwork.
In 1986
he joined ABC
News as a correspondent before leaving to
become anchor of the naLionally
syndicated
program
"Inside
Edition."
O'Reilly became executive producer and
anchor of
"The
O'Reilly Factor" in
1996, im-
5
UM
MER 2001
17










































The Television Show
Fox News
Channel's
"The O'Reilly
Factor"

Has
toppled
"Larry
King
Live"
as No. 1
cable
news
talk show,
according
to
Nielsen
Media
Research,
ending
the
King
program's
nearly
15-year
run as top
cable
news
show
mediately after
earning
an
M.A.
in
public
policy
from
Harvard
University.
It
has been a
steady climb
up
the
popularity ladder
for the
Long
Island native, culminating
in
an
impres-
sive multiyear contract extension with
Fox
News Channel earlier
this
year.
That doesn't seem
Lo
matter
the
most to
him, however. Spending Lime with
his
wife
and child are
more
imponant than any con-
tract,
which
is
why
he
gets up every morning
to
watch
"Elmo"
on
television
with
his
two-
year-ol
d
daughter before heading
LO
Manhattan.
"I
just
don't
work for money," O'Reilly
said. "1
don't
care
LO
hobnob
in the HampLOns
or get a yacht and sail around
the
south of
France.
It
doesn't appeal
to
me in
the
least."
Still,
he
has
his
critics who
label him
arrogant and overbearing. But
the
hosL of
the
"no
spin
zone" has
a simple answer for people
like
that.
"Most
of
the
criticism
is
born
from
jealousy.
That's
just the
way
it
is
in
the media,"
O'Reilly said.
"People
are jealous and
then
they throw
out
'arrogant'
or
'conceited'
or
'cocky'
or whatever this stuff
they throw
ouL is, and I
dismiss it."
O'Reilly delivered one of
the
mosL
memorable
commencement
addresses
in
recent years, mix-
inghumorand
advice
LO
engage
the students throughout.
Most
came away
impressed
with what he
had
LO
say
18
The Elook
The O'Heilly
Factor:
The Good,
the Bad, and the Completely
Ridiculous
in American
Life

Copies
sold
to date:
1.1 million

Initial
Iprint
run:
30,000

Copiei;
in
print: 1,033,500
in print
and 16
printings

Next
book:
The
No Spin
Zone.
Confrontations
with the Powerful
and Famous
in America,
on
sale
in October
2001

Upcoming
book
tour:
New
York
City,
Long
Island,
San
Francisco,
Los
Angeles.
Washing-
ton,
D.C.,
Philadelphia
and
Chicago

Weeks
on The
New
York
Times
"Best
Sellers"
list: 32;
11 weeks
at No. 1

Other
13est
Sellers
lists:
Publishers
Weekly
Barnes
and
Noble
Los
Aogeles
Times
The
~Vall
Street
Journal
USA
roday

After
its
first day
of sales,
hit
the No,.
1 spot
on Amazon.com
and remains
in the
top 20
THE NEW
YORK
TIMES BOOK REVIEW
Best Sellers
~~=k
NONFICTION
Last
WetU
Week
OnList
1
THE O'REILLY
FACTOR,
by Bill O'Reilly. (Broad-
way, $23.) The host of a cable news program offers
opinions on what's right and wrong with America.
4
2
AN HOUR
BEFORE
DAYUGHT,
by Jimmy Carter.
I
(Simon
&
Schuster, $26.) The former president recalls
his Depressl~ra
childhood on a Georgia farm.
3
ICE BOUND, by Jerri Nielsen with Maryanne Vollers.
2
25
8
(Talk
Mlramax/Kyperion. $23.95.) A memoir by the
doctor who was at the South Pole when she dlscov-
~--
•.a......,.
_1.,
...
\o..,.,. ..,...,._
--~
and were
definitely
not bored with
the
speaker
like O'Rtiilly was at his commencement.
"Being
a MarisL
graduate himself,
he
was very
easy
to
rdaLe
to,"
said Meghan O'Geary of
Farmingdale, N.
Y
, who earned a B.S. in
busi-
ness administration.
"ll
was an entertaining
address, yet 1 think all of us came away with
some sound advice
that
we will
try
LO
adhere
to in the future."
O'Reilly said his goal now
is just LO
stay
healthy and
LO
"continue to watch the power-
ful and
keep them in
line."
His new
book is
due
out
in
October, appropriately called The
No Spin Zone: Confrontations
with the Powerful
and Famous
in
America.
His
commencement speech confirmed that
his irreverem auitude hasn't changed over the
past three decades.
"I
just
wish,"
he
said, "Bill
ClinLOn
and Hillary were
in
the front row LO
see me get a Doctorate of
Humane
Letters."





















The new
Fontaine
Hall, at
the
north
end
of the
campus,
is
home to the School
of
Liberal
Arts,
the Marist
College
lnstit11te
for Public Opinion
and
the Office of
College
Advancement.
A
Home for the rlumanities
A new building housing the School of Liberal Arts is named for
President Emeritus Bro. Paul Ambrose Fontaine, FMS.
A
new
academic building opened on the
Marist campus this fall bearing a
time-
honored
name across its entrance.
The 22,000-square-foot
Fontaine
Hall,
just
north
of the Dyson Center and overlook-
ing the
Hudson River,
is named for Bro. Paul
Ambrose Fontaine, FMS. President emeritus
and a
life
trustee
of the college,
Brother Paul
played
an integral role in shaping Marist dur-
ing its
early years.
Fontaine Hall is now home
LO
the School
of Liberal Arts, formerly known as the Divi-
sion of
Humanities.
The School's
main
office,
faculty offices and conference rooms occupy
the building's second and third levels. The
MarisL
College
Institute
for Public Opinion
(MIPO), complete with its own 35-worksta-
tion
phoning center,
is
located on
the
first
floor,
down
the
hall
from four classrooms
equipped with
multimedia
podiums and
pro-
jection
systems. An adjacent "black
box"
theatre features a sound system, video and
computer
projection
capabilities,
black
walls
and a
black
floor
LO
allow
for
dramatic pro-
jected images and other performance effects.
The lower
level
is home to College Advance-
ment, where
Marist's fund-raising
activities
Marist
President Emeritus
Bro. Paul
Ambrose
Fontaine, FMS (third
from right)
was
honored
at
tlie dedication
of Fontaine
Hall as Marist
President Dennis
Murray (far
right)
and
Marist Trustees
(left to
right)
Michael
Duffy,
Jach
Gartland,
Rob Dyson
and Frances
Reese
1111veiled
a
commemorative
plaque.
are headquartered along with
the
offices of
Alumni Affairs and College
Relations. The
area
has its
own entrance at
the
building's
north end. The building was
designed by
Perry
Dean Rogers
& Partners and built
by
Pavarini Construction,
the
same
team
who
produced the
James
A.
Cannavino
Library.
Nearly 300
trustees,
faculty and staff
members, students and alumni anended
the
dedication of Fontaine
Hall,
held in October
during
Homecoming/Reunion Weekend.
Brother
Paul
was the guest ofhonor,joined by
family members
including
his brother,
Earl,
his brother'i; wife,
Kathleen, their
three grown
Fontaine
Hall is now
home
to
the
School of Liberal Arts,
formerly known as the
Division
of
Humanities.
children, and
Brother
Paul's nephew, Michael
Fontaine, a senior at Marist.
AL the end of the ceremony a
plaque
was
unveiled
telling the story of Brother Paul's
long
association with the college. Born in
Southbridge, Massachusetts,
on Aug. 28, I 913,
Leonard Edward
Fontaine
joined
the Marist
Brothers in 1926. After completing his
reli-
gious training
in Poughkeepsie
in 1930, he
taught
in
Marist schools in
the
Northeast and
earned degrees at Fordham, Villanova and
Catholic universities.
In 194 3
the
Marist
Broth-
ers named
him
master of scholastics of the
MarisL Normal Training
School
in
Poughkeepsie.
He led
the
school for 15 years,
overseeing
its
transformation from a two-year
college
for
Marist
Brothers
to the four-year
institution chartered
by
the state of New York
in
1946
that
later
became
Marist College.
Under
Brother Paul's leadership, the
col-
lege
reached a number of
milestones.
The
Brothers provided the manual
labor to
con-
struct several campus buildings and in 1957
opened their classrooms to laymen. In
1958
the
Marist Brothers appointed
him
assistant
general in
Rome, in
charge of Marist missions
in the United States, Asia and Africa. Brother
Paul spent the next 18 years overseas, estab-
lishing
schools and expanding apostolates
in
India.Japan,
Pakistan,
Sarawak and Sri Lanka.
Following his service
in Rome,
Brother
Paul
served the Marist communities and
schools in the United States and Liberia.
In
1989 President
Dennis
Murray
invited
him
back
LO
the
college to serve as an advisor and
assist with numerous projects.
He
lived in the
Kieran
Gatehouse for 11 years before being
assigned
by
the Marist Brothers Lo a
post
in
Miami in August 2000.




W[J]{lf~,




















....
tar
Basketball took Rik Smits '88 from
his Holland homeland
to
the NCAA
Tournament with the Red Foxes
and then to the NBA with the Indiana
Pacers. Now retired, he reflects on his
memorable journey.
R
ik Smits always considered
himself to be
an adventurer.
But
even
the
man
nick-
named the
"Dunking Dutchman"
never
thought
his adventure to
the United
States
would take him
to the
places he's been.
"I came over
here to
enjoy myself and
do
something different," the
1988
graduate of
Marist
said. "It
never
crossed my mind
to
make the
NBA at that
time."
Smits was
the integral part
of
the
four
most exciting years in
the history
of Marist
athletics which culminated in his selection
by
the
Indiana Pacers as the No. 2 pick overall in
the 1988 NBA
draft.
Only National
Player
of
the Year
Danny Manning
of
the
1988 NCAA
Championship
KansasJayhawks
was selected
higher
in
a
talent-laden
year
that
included:
No. 5 Mitch Richmond of
Kansas
State; No. 6
Hersey
Hawkins of Bradley; No. 8 Rex
Chapman of Kentucky; No. 9
Rony Seikaly
of
Syracuse; No.
14
Dan Majerle of Central Michi-
gan; and No.
19 Rod
Strickland of
DePaul.
Through
his
immense talent, Rik
Smits
defied
the odds
in breaking into
the NBA from a
small school and
relatively
young Division
I
program. The native of Eindhoven, Holland,
would
go on
to play
12 seasons in the NBA for
the Pacers before
announcing his
retirement
this
past September.
During his NBA career, Smits would ex-
tend
Marist's
name nationally
in
an
unprecedented
way. Each time a starting
lineup
was announced, Smits was introduced as a 7-
foot-4
center out of Marist College. Even
the
back of
his
NBA trading cards
mentioned his
alma
mater.
"He
has been
a great ambassador for the
college,"
Marist
President Dennis
Murray
said.
"He
has
been exceptionally loyal to Marist.
Above all,
he has
earned respect on and off the
court. The legacy of
Rik
Smits will endure at
Marist
as well as in the record books of the
NBA."
And this was somewhat
unexpected.
Smits
came to Marist's
Town
of Poughkeepsie cam-
pus in
1984
expecting
to be
a
backup to fellow
classmate
Miro Pecarski,
considered by some
to be
Europe's top 17-year-old player. But
BY DAN PIETRAFESA
'88
NCAAs:
brin,ging prestige to Marist and
show-
casing
Rik
Smits's
talent.
The
7' 4"
Rifa
on
his
bike, a
familiar
sight
011
campus
during his
student days.
Pecarski was injured in preseason, opening
up
an opportunity
for
Smits. By mid-season,
Smits earned a spot in
the
starting
lineup
and
helped Maris1.capture
its first
conference title.
"Rik was
like
a sponge," said Marist head
men's coach Dave
Magarity,
who coached
Smits in his junior and senior seasons at
Marist. "He absorbed everything and was a
quick
study. He was such a pleasure
to
be
around."
_ete
It
was during
the
1985-86 season, Smits's
sophomore year, that Marist basketball began
earning national recognition. Television
crews
and journalists were coming to campus to
learn more
about
the
program labeled by
legendary
broadcaster Marv Albert as the
"United Nations of College Basketball." The
men's basketball team
had
five
foreigners-
Smits, the 6-foot-11 Pecarski, the 7-foot
Rudy
Bougarel
of Guadeloupe, Alain Forestier of
France and Peter
Krasovec
of
Hungary-that
season, the first of back-to-back years the
program went to the NCAA Division
I
Tour-
nament.
Marist would
lose
both times in the first
round
of the NCAA
Tournament.
For Smits,
it
was an opportunity
to
bring
prestige
to the
college and to showcase his skills
to
pro
scouts against two of college
basketball's top
centers
in
Georgia Tech's
John
Sally and
the
University
of
Piusburgh
's Charles Smith. Smith
was
later
selected as the No. 3 overall pick
(one behind Smits)
in
the 1988 NBA draft.
Smits was a combined
l
7-for-23 from the
floor on
his
way
LO
38 points in those two
NCAA
games, 22 of which came against
the
7-
foot Sally and Georgia
Tech.
"It was
the
first time
I
realized
there might
be
a chance to make
it
(in the NBA),"
Smits
said of the game against Georgia Tech. "I
thought I
did preuy
reasonable. We
really
hadn't
seen much competition until then and
I
held my own against him. Until then,
I
had
no real
measuring stick. When he and Mark
Price
went to
the
NBA (in 1987), I thought it
might be a
possibility
for me,
too."
The
success of the program and Smits also
enabled the Red Foxes to play on a few occa-
sions each season in big arenas
like
Madison
Square Garden in New York City and the
Meadowlands in
New Jersey. Marist was play-
ing formidable opponents like St. John's,
Cleveland State, Memphis State, Villanova,
Miami and Providence.
Even though the program was barred
from
the 1988
NCAA Tournament for NCAA in-
fractions, the Red Foxes were not done. Marist
captured
a
third
conference title in four years.
As for Smits,
he
would end his collegiate
career with a
then-school
record 45-point
night against St. Francis (Pa.). It was his final
collegiate game and the same night his No. 45
jersey was
retired
and displayed on the nonh
wall of the McCann
Recreation
Center.
The
two-time
conference
player
of
the
year concluded
his
Marist career as
the
school's
all-time leader in blocked shots with 345.
Smits, who established 25 school records in
his collegiate
playing days,
is
second on Marist's
all-time list
in
scoring points (1,945) and
SUMMER
2001
21

























"Not
only were the injuries
bothering me but the hours of
treatment, and being away from
my family was tough. I always
said
I
wanted
to
stop
at the top
of my
game."
rebounding (811).
"It
was preuy exciting, nol only playing
basketball al Marisl but the whole college
experience," said Smits, who
declined the
opportunity
to
turn
pro
following his
junior
season.
"For
me, it was something new and
something I enjoyed
very
much."
In the
NBA, Smits averaged 14.8
points
and 6.1 rebounds
per
game in his career with
the
Indiana
Pacers
and is currently second on
the
team's all-time list in seasons (12), games
(867), minutes (23,100), field goals
made
(5,301),
field
goals attempted (10,461) and
defensive rebounds (3,746).
He
is Indiana's
all-time leader
in blocked
shots with 1,111. In
1999 he
was
named
one of Indiana's 50Great-
est
Players,
selected by a blue-ribbon
panel
of
basketball
experts sought out
by the Pacers
to
identify
the
best players ever
to
play
in
the
state of
Indiana.
The
Pacers
played
in
five Eastern Confer-
ence finals and one NBA final during Smits' 12
seasons.
He
also
played
in
the 1998
NBA All-
Star Game at
Madison
Square Garden.
"He's
been one of the
most
well-known
alumni
because
of what he
did
every night,"
said Marist Athletics
Direct◊r
Tim Murray,
who was an assistant
men's
basketball coach
during Smits' years at
Marist.
"In
the
NBA,
you see
many
times
how
dollars can change
one's personality. The
most
impressive thing
about
Rik
is
to this
day
he's the
same
Rik
Smits
who
played
here at Marist College."
Smits considered retiring after
the
1998-
99 season but
returned
after
then
Indiana
coach Larry Bird
found
him an effective
physi-
cal
therapist
lO
help
with
his
ailing
feet.
By
the
middle
of the
1999-2000
season, other inju-
ries
were catching up
lO
Smits and he preuy
much
knew il would
be
his last campaign.
Smits waited
to
announce
his
retirement
until
last
September
because
Pacers president
Donnie
Walsh was hoping Smits would
re-
consider his decision and
make
a return.
"After
12 years it became a
job,"
Smits
said.
"My
feet didn't
hurt last year. My knees
started
to hurt.
I used
to
have
back
spasms
once a year and
they
started
to
come two or
three times
a year.
If I kept going,
I may
have
needed
back
surgery.
"The
time was
just
right and
it
was a
combination of everything. Not only were the
injuries
bothering
me
but
the hours of
treat-
ment, and being away from my family was
tough.
l
always said I wanted
to
stop at
the top
of
my
game."
Since his
retirement,
Smits
has
played
three
games for the Dutch National Team,
leading
the
team
lO
vicLOries
in
all
three
con-
tests.
And
there
was even talk of an NBA
22
M A R
I
ST
M A G A Z
I
N E
Smits
wa1s ,1amed one
of the
50 greatest players
in
the state
of
Indiana's history.
return
tC>
a championship contender for the
second half of
the regular
season and the
playoffs.
"I
said
I'd
consider it at
that point,"
Smits
said.
"I
don't think
I'm
going
lO
come back.
I'm
having
a pretty good time
in
retirement.
Once a week,
I
play
basketball
at the local
high
school and
I'm
still sore
the next
day.
If
I do it
every
day,
the
pain
will come back."
Smits
is
enjoying
his
retirement and
the
time he's
spending with
his
wife, Candice,
and children,
Jasmine
and Derrik. He's also
able to enjoy
his
hobbies like
rebuilding
old
cars and riding his motorbikes. Owning a
motorsports
team
and/or coaching
high
school
or collegiate post players are in Smits' thoughts
for the future.
But other things are taking a
priority
right
now.
"This
year,
I'm
spending a lot of time
being
a
dad."

Dan Pietrafesa is a 1988 graduate of Marist
College where he covered the men's basketball
team for
The
Circle.
He
currently covers the
Marist
men's
basketball team for the
Poughkeepsie
Journal.





















Hudson Valley Heritage
Collector's Editic,n
A Poughkeepsie
Journal book features
Marist experts on the Hudson Valley.
W
en
the
Poughkeepsie
journal.
a Ganneu
ewspaper serving the Mid-Hudson
Valley,
decided
to document the area's
history
and culture
in
an ambitious millen-
nium
series, the call went out
to more than
30
experts from Marist.
Faculty. staff and students contributed
their scholarship on everything
from the
valley's
people, history,
industry and envi-
ronment to
its
economy,
recreation,
arts and
religions. They were among more
than 400
contributors examining
the personalities,
in-
stitutions and events that shaped
the
history
of the valley and
the
world beyond.
The
articles first appeared in 1999 in a
monthly
Journal
series called
"Heralding
the New
Millennium"
that went on to win four national
awards,
including First Place
from
the
Educa-
tion
Writers
Association. Now
the
series has
been condensed into a
hardbound
402-page
collector's edition,
The
Hudson
Valley, Our
Heritage, Our Future.
The volume includes 630
photos
and
203
illustrations and other works of art as well as
a
14-page
index with more
than
5,000entries.
It is
available
for
$60
plus
tax at
Mid-Hudson
Valley
bookstores
and
historic
sites and
through
www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/
projects/bookslindex.htm
or by contacting
Roseann Simpson at (845) 451-4530 or
rsimpson@poughkee.ganneu.com.

Marist Faculty, Staff and Students on the Hudson Valley
• Bakari
,1deyemi,
assistant
director
of
field
experience,
on ways
companies
can
recruit
and
keep
the
best
emp
I oyees
• Thomas
W. Casey,
professor
of
philosophy
and regional
history,
on
President
Franklin
Delano
Roosevelt's
Hudson
Valley
roots
• The Rev. Modele
Clarke,
School
of Communication
and
the Arts,
on
the
importance
of
teaching
children
they
have
choices
• Pete Colaizzo
'86,
men's
track
and
cross
country
head
coach,
on
hiking
in the
Hudson
Valley
• Jill Crit1:hley
'00
on the value
of higher
education
• Jeff Dahncke
'01
on Army
football
traditions
• Dr. Ann Davis,
director
of
the Bureau
of
Economic
Research
at Maris!,
on the
growth
of
the service
industry
<luring
the past
century
• Dr. John Doherty,
chair
of
the
Department
of
Criminal
Justice.
on
the evolution
of law
enforcement
over
the
past
century
• Dr. Lind,a
Dunlap,
chair
of the Department
of Psychology,
on the
importance
of community
and
family
ties to
chiild
development
• John
Gildard,
lecturer
in criminal
justice
and
human
resources
coordinator.
on
police
efforts
to
fight
drugs
in Poughkeepsie
• Robert
(irossman.
professor
of business,
on
the
history
of labor
unions
and
on the history
and
mis-
sion of te,achers'
unions
• Dr. Clair<e
Keith,
assistant
professor
of modern
languages,
on
pioneering
journalist
Lowell
Thomas
• Wayne
l.empka,
School
of
Communication
and
the Arts.
on the
history
of
photography,
featuring
art by
Art Department
colleague
Dan McCormack
• Dr. Guy
ILometti,
dean
of the School
of
Communication
and
the
Arts,
on
how
digital
technology
will
affect
society
• Dr. Bruce
Luske,
associate
professor
of
sociology,
on
the importance
of
working
for social
justice
• Dr. Thomas
Lynch,
chair
of the
Department
of Environmental
Science,
on
how
the
mix of salt
and
fresh
water
in
t11e
Hudson
River
affects
area
drinking
water

Chief
College
Relations
Officer
Timmian
Massie
on
the
history
of
the Marist
Brothers
in
Poughkeepsie
and
on th,e
founder
of
the Marist
Brothers,
Saint
Marcellin
Champagnat
• Dr. Lawrence
Menapace,
associate
professor
of chemistry,
on
ethical
issues
in
science
• Dr. Greg Moses,
assistant
professor
of philosophy,
on cherishing
the diverse
cultures
in America;
on
efforts
in the Mid-Hudson
Valley
to improve
human
rights;
and
on
the
human
need
for spiritual
comfort
• Dr. Denn1is
Murray,
president,
on
ways
technology
is enhancing
education
• Dr. JoAnne
Myers,
assistant
professor
of
political
science,
on
the
gay
rights
movement
• Dr. Mar
IPeter-Raoul,
chair
of
the Department
of Philosophy
and
Religious
Studies,
on
Hudson
Valley
groups
working
for world
peace
• Dr. Darmll Roe.
assistant
professor
of
media
arts,
on
broadcast
giant
Edward
R. Murrow
• Dr. John Scileppi,
professor
of
psychology,
and
Dr. Anne
Botsford,
associate
professor
of social
work,
on
the
need
for a
universal
health
plan
• Dr. Martin Shaffer.
chair
of
the
Department
of
Political
Science.
on how
FDR's
public
relations
strate-
gies
launched
a new
era
of
political
persuasion
• Tim Smillh,
men's
tennis
head
coach,
on
the
history
of tennis
in the
Hudson
Valley
• Dr. Michael Tori,
assistant
professor
of
religious
studies,
on
human
perceptions
of death
over
the
past
century
• Dr. Willi,am
Van 0rnum,
professor
of
psychology,
on
the
history
of mental
health
care
in the
Hudson
Valley
• Dr. Thomas
Wermuth,
Dean
of
the School
of Liberal
Arts,
on Hudson
Valley
veterans
of World
Wars
I
and
II
• Dr. David
Woolner,
assistant
professor
of
history,
on
the
political
contributions
of
FDR's
Treasury
Secretary
and Hyde
Park
neighbor,
Henry
Morgenthau
Jr.
and
on how
FDR's
legacy
has
influenced
policy
today
• Dr. Louis:
Zuccarello,
professor
of
political
science.
on
the
Poughkeepsie
School
Plan,
an innovative
partnership
between
parochial
and
public
schools;
on
the late
Rev.
Norman
Vincent
Peale,
a Pawling,
N.Y.,
resiclent;
on the Hudson
Valley
activities
of
Mother
Frances
Xavier
Cabrini.
the
first U.S.
citizen
to
be declared
a saint
by
the
Catholic
Church;
and
on the
legacy
of
Monsignor
Joseph
F. Sheahan,
pastor
of
St. Peter's
Church
in Poughkeepsie
from
1906
to
1934
S U
M M
E
R
2
0
0
1
23





























league
!leaders
Marist Tops the MMC
Marist successfully
defended its Commissioner's
Cup, achieving an
unprece,dented
three-peat of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference's highest
honor, and sent three teams to NCAA competition.
I
t may be premature
tO
call it a dynasty, but
after four
years
of
competition in
the Metro
Atlantic
Athletic Conference,
Marist
Col-
lege
has
already established itself as the school
to beat.
This
year, Maristsuccessfullydefended
its
Commissioner's Cup
trophy, making an un-
precedented three-peat
of
the league's
highest
honor. In
winning its
third
Commissioner's
Cup, which recognizes overall athletic excel-
lence in 25 sports sponsored
by the
MMC,
Marist
swept
the
award, winning both
the
men's
and women's individual
awards.
Each
year
league
schools earn
points
for regular
season and
t◊urnament
finishes,
with
the
cup
being
awarded
tO
the
school that earns
the
most points at
the
end of the
academic
year.
"At
Marist,
we
have
once
again
proven
that athletic excellence and academic excel-
lence
can go
hand-in-hand,"
said Marist
President
Dennis
Murray. "Success at this
level
starts at
the
t◊p
and a great deal of credit
is
owed to our athletics director, Tim Murray,
and his staff. Tim has done an excellent job
in
not only assuring that our
teams
win, but that
our student-athletes
represent
the very best
values of Marist College."
Seven MAAC
Titles
and
Three NCAA Appearances
This season seven Marist programs won MMC
Championships, the
most
in school history,
while an additional eight programs finished
among
the
t◊p
three in
the
league's final
standing. Athletically speaking, the
Red
Foxes
opened
the 2000-2001
academic year click-
ing
on all cylinders as
both the
women's cross
country team and
the men's
soccerteam earned
the
MMC's highest honors.
Led
by Jenni fer Rosenblatt
'04, who
placed
third
overall, the running Red Foxes placed
three runners
in the top 10
(five
in
the top 13)
to collect
42 points
and outdistance second-
place
Manhattan by 20 points. The victory
marked the third
consecutive title for head
coach Phil Kelly and
the
women's cross coun-
try
team.
The fall semester was
brought
to a close in
upset fashion as
the men's
soccer team fin-
ished the
regular
season with a 9-9 overall
record
and a 5-4 conference mark, earning
the
Red
Foxes the
fourth
and final seed in the
Top singles
player Patrich Hofer
'03,
named
most
outstainding
male player at
the
2001
MAAC
Championships,
helped
lead the Red
Foxes
to
their thirol
NCAA appearance.
BY
SEAN
MORRISON
-
24
M A R
I
$
T M A G A Z
I
N E







































On the water, the men's and women's crew programs earned
national rankings and swept both MAAC titles to further solidify
Marist's retention of the MAAC Commissioner's Cup.
Marist's
Nationally
Ranked
Crews
Men's
Freshman
Eight
1
Washington
2
Princeton
3 California
4 Brown
5 Wisconsin
6
Northeastern
7 Rutgers
8 Oregon
State
9
Cornell
10 Navy
11 Maris!
12 Penn
13 Michigan
14 Dartmouth
15 Boston
University
16 Mariella
17Drexel
18
Columbia
Men's
Varsity Eight
1 California
2 Princeton
3 Wisconsin
4 Cornell
5
Brown
6 Northeastern
7 Dartmouth
8 Wisconsin
9
Pennsylvania
10 Oregon
State
11 Dowling
12 Stanford
13
Temple
14
Syracuse
15 Maris!
16
Georgetown
17
Columbia
18
Virginia
19
Navy
20 Michigan
21 Boston
University
22
UCal-Davis
23 Rutgers
24
MIT
MAAC
Tournament. A goal by Joe Crespo
'03
at the 63:01
mark
proved to be the
back-
breaker as Marist defeated Loyola, which
had
earned
national
rankings at several
different
times throughout the course of the year, 2-1.
In
the
conference
finals,
Marist forward
and
tournament
MVP Sean Murphy
'02
scored
the
game-winning goal, assisted
by
Joe, at the
111th
minute to lift Marist to a 3-2 double
ovenime victory over
Fairfield
University,
ranked
15
th
nationally.
The victory also gave
the Red Foxes
their first-ever
berth in the
NCAA men's soccer tournament and a match
against
Indiana
University-Purdue Univer-
sity at
Indianapolis. Joining
Sean on
the
all-tournament team were
MAAC
Regular
Sea-
son Player of the
Year Joe
Crespo, forward
Brian Garafola
'02,
forward Patrick McCall
'03 and goalkeeper Carlos DeBrito '02. In
Indianapolis, Marist
brought IUPUI
to triple
overtime before dropping a
1-0
decision
in
sudden
death.
Individual
Excellence
As winter cooled the
Hudson
Valley, things
stayed hot athletically,
particularly
in
the
water.
The men's
and women's swimming teams
again electrified
the
pool with outstanding
performances.
Led
by
MAAC
Most Outstand-
ing
Swimmer and Marist College 2001
Male
Women's
Lightweight
IElght
1 Princeton
2 Wisconsin
3 Radcliffe
4
MIT
5
Villanova
6 Mercyhurst
7 Delaware
10 Maris!
9 St. Joe's
10
Dayton
11
UCLA
12
Central
Flor da
Erin
McGrath
'01
(center),
tlie first Marist athlete
to
win
an
indi-
vidual
event
at
the
ECAC
Swimming and
Diving
Champions/tips,
was
presented
the
2001 Marist
Female Athlete
of tlie Year award by Direc-
tor of Atltletics
Tim
Murray and women's
coac/1
Cliristine Honig.
Tim Bittner
"03
was drafted by
tlte Chicago
Wltite Sox
ii~
the 10th round of the Major
League
Baseball June draft. The fourth Marist
player ever drafted
(otlters
were
Kevin
Olore,
by Seattle, George Santiago, by tlte
N.
Y. Mets,
and Mi11e Sp1ichhardt, by St. Louis), he
is
tlte
highest selec1tion
ever.
Athlete of the Year
Keith
Nichols
'O
1, the
Red
Foxes captured their sixth consecutive MAAC
title. Under thte
direction
of Larry Van Wagner,
the men's swimming team compiled a perfect
6-0 conference dual
meet
mark as well as an
impressive
11-0 overall
dual meet
record. A
milestone year for
the Red
Fox
program
was
made more significant by
Keith's
performance
at the
ECAC
Championship, where Marist
0
finished third out of 35 programs. At the
I
ECAC Championship Keith, who finished
"' first
in
the 200-yard
backstroke,
became the
I
first
Marist
male swimmer ever
to
win an
2
individual
event.
On
the
women's side of the
pool
the Red
Foxes entered the MAAC Championships
having won
the
last
four conference
titles.
In
a hotly contested
meet, the
Red Foxes
fell
on
the final
day
of competition to finish second
overall at
the
event. Marist was led by Erin
McGrath '01, who over
the
course of her
career established
herself
as the most her-
alded swimmer in school
history.
This season
alone Erin broke
five
individual
school
records,
was named the MAAC's
Most
Outstanding
Swimmer and Marist
Female
Athlete of
the
Year and became the first Marist swimmer to
win an
individual
title
at
the
ECAC Champi-
onship with
her
first-place performance
in
the
100-yard
butterfly.
Traditionally
the
strongest season of the
Marist Athletics Department, the spring again
bolstered the successful
defense
of the
Commissioner's Cup. Kicking off the season
was
the men's
tennis program, which cap-
tured
an undefeated 9-0 record in conference
play en route to its third consecutive MAAC
title and NCAA Tournament berth. Facing
No. 13 nationally ranked Louisiana State
University
in
Baton
Rouge, the Red Foxes
dropped
a 4-0
decision to
end
the
season.
Marist
was
led
all year
by
Patrick Dahnen '02,
who compiled a 14-10
record
at fourth singles.
Nationally
Ranked
Crews
On
the
river, the
men's
and women's crew
programs swept both MAAC
titles
to
further
solidify Marist's
retention
of the cup. The
men's crew program, anchored
by
the varsity
eight boat of Chris Kullak
'03,
RobChimchirian
'02,AndyFrench
'02, Dave Buckner'02, Mike
Boehm '03, Eric Schaefer
'O
1, Andrew Cox
$
U
M M E R 2 0 0 l
25






























l
\
Ryan Brady
'01
brohe
tliree
school career
records in captaining
Marist
to its
second
co11-
secutive
(third
in 10
years) NCAA
Tournament.
'03, Nick McAvoy
'02
and coxswain
Phil
McDowell '03, led MarisL
LO
a No. 24 ranking
in
Lhe
USA Today
poll.
The Red Foxes won
every event entered en route
to
defeating
second-place Loyola by 52 points. At Lhe
lmercollegiate
Rowing
Association (IRA)
National Championship regatta, the varsiLy
eight
boat,
led
by
Dave Buckner and Andy
French,
turned in
a great performance to
help
Marist
finish the
year ranked No. 15 nationally.
In
the
finals, MarisL omdistanced
perennial
powers Georgetown, Columbia, Navy, Virginia
and Michigan.
Dave
and Andy were among 19
athletes
nationwide
invited to attend
USRowing's Men's Pre-Elite Nation's Cup
Selection Camp. The camp
determines
which
men will
represent
the
United States at the
2001 NaLion's Cup
in
Linz, Austria,
in July.
The women, whose lightweight eight
ranked as
high
as No. 4 nationally over the
course of the year, completed
Marist's
rowing
sweep with a 56-point win over second-place
Fairfield.
The
women's program won five of
the seven races entered and
finished
second
in
the
two that
they
did
not win. At the IRAs,
Susan Burke '01 and Kerri Ravian '01
led the
Red Foxes'
lightweight boat LO
a No. 8 na-
tional
ranking
to
become the
first
Marist
women's
boat
ever
to
finish the year with a
national ranking.
Also at
the IRAs,
the
men's
crew
program
showed signs of
future promise.
The
men's
freshman
eight boat defeated the likes of
Penn,
Michigan, Dartmouth, Boston Univer-
sity and Columbia to finish the year
ranked
No. 11 nationally.
26
M A R
I
S
T M A G A Z I N E
The
wo•men's
cross country team
traveled to Disney's Wide World
of
Sports
Complex
in
Orland,o to
win
its tl,ird
consecutive
MAAC
Championship.
Goalkeeper
Carlos De Brito
'02
ea med
A
II-Tournament
honors
in
leading
Marist to
the 2000
MAAC
Championship
and the program's
first-ever NCAA
Tournament.
not only over the
last
year.
but
the past
three
years," said Tim Murray. "The award
is
shared
Marist concluded the season with an out-
by the
college community, not only as an
standing
performance
in the MAAC Baseball athletic success, but as a Marist success. Our
Tournament. Under the direction of sixth-
athletic accomplishments not only occur on
year
he:ad
coach john Szefc, Mari st has quickly
the field, bm are mirrored
in
our achieve-
become
one of
the
Northeast's winningest ments
in
the classroom as well,
truly defining
programs
in
only
its
10
th
year of competition.
whaL it means to be a student-athlete."
The 2001 baseball season marked the
MarisL student-athletes achieved
just
as
return of Marist to the NCAA
Tournament
for
much
success
in
the classroom as they
did
on
the
third
Lime
in five years. AfLer breezing the playing field. BaskeLball players Blake
througln
the MAAC Tournament with
three
Sonne '01 and Sabrina Vallery '01 were named
straigh1t
victories,
the
Red Foxes headed out to
Verizon District
I
Academic All-Americans.
the
Palo
Alto, Calif., regional
Lhat
included
Sabrina, a psychology/special education ma-
perennial
national
powers Texas,
Long Beach
jor,
maintained a 3.8 GPA while becoming
State-the alma mater of Marist President Dr.
only
Lhe
seventh women's basketball player
in
Dennis
Murray-and host
SLanford, ranked
MarisL history to net 1,000 points. Blake, a
No.
4
nationally.
business administration major, earned a 3.9
Taking
on the
region's
Lop seed, Stanford,
GPA, balancing academics and community
the
Red
Foxes
dropped
the first game of
the
service while he and his wife raised their
double elimination tournament by
infant son.
a
narrow 4-3
margin.
RelegaLed
to
In
addition, nine student-athletes,
the
loser's
bracket,
Marist's Tim
representing
seven varsity
programs,
Bittner '03 scattered eight
hits
achieved a perfect Fall 2000 GPA of
(four runs) and struck out nine
1
t
4.0,
while over 51 percent of Manst's
over6.linningsofworkandKevin
~
Y
student-athletes attained a semester
Ool '03,
closed
the door as the
Red
·y~
GPA of 3 0 or above. The Marist
FoxeseliminatedLongBeachState
~;
student-athlete body, comprised of
7-6. The victory advanced Marist
523 members, combined for a fall
to yet another
meeting
with
✓,
_
semester grade point average of
Stanford, where the
Red
Foxes'
3.03-the
highest
in the Athletics
season ended with a 6-0
loss.
Department's history.

A
Big
Spring
Finish
"The Marist College athletic
program, its sLUdent-athletes
and coaches, should be proud
of
the
:success it has achieved

















Student Profile
Cycling Through
Cyberspace
A passion for biking inspires a Web
site.
M
any Marist College students know
how
to build
Web sites by the
Lime
they
leave the
well-wired campus.
But MaristjuniorJoel
Martinez created an
unusual Web site
before
he got
to
college.Joel
(pronounced
Jo-ELL)
and his older brother,
Demetrio, created
their
site, KnowGoNYC,
while
he
was still in high school.
The Web site
is devoted
to
bicycling
in
New York City, home to
the
Martinez broth-
ers. Their
passion
for
biking
grew from
childhood bike rides with their father on the
trails of Central Park. The site provides such
esoteric details as where
to park
a bike, where
to
register it, lists
of
bike
shops and cycling
clubs, and rules for bringing
bikes
on sub-
years he
traveled
with other
students
to
West Virginia
during
Easter
breaks to
help
repair homes as
part
of the
Appalachia Service Project.
He
was also one
of
10
recipi-
ents of
the
inaugural
Lena
Horne Youth
Leadership
award, a $10,000 scholar-
ship given to students for
community service.
Curiously, although
he
was interested
in
Web de-
sign,
it
wasn't Marist's high-technology
offerings that
drew
Joel. "I actually chose
Mari
st beca1use
junior
year
I
came up on a
tour
ways,
trains
and
buses.
During its first year their
Web
site,
then
called
LatiCyclist,
was a section on a
larger site, Latiknow.com.
It
won one of
20
awards for en-
trepreneurship
and creativity
from
the
Citizens Committee
for New York City and
Fleet
Bank on Fleet Youth Entre-
preneur Day. On May,
10,
The Web site appears
to be a labor of
love
for the brothers,
inspired by memories
of their bike rides
through Central Park
with their father.
and
I just really
fell
in
love
with the school itself," he says.
"l
didn't really
even
know
what
I wanted to
do.
But it was just
the perfect size campus for
me. It
was just so welcoming."
During his freshman
year
he
contemplated a
major in
in-
formation
technology
but
now
has
decided
on
psychology.
2000,
the brothers
launched
KnowGoNYC
at
its
own address,
www.KnowGoNYC.com.
Joel,
19,
and Demetrio,
21,
learned
to
develop
Web pages
through
a program of
Cornell University Cooperative Extension
called YouthNet,
designed
to
link
youth in the
community of Highbridge,
in
the Bronx,
to
the
Internet to
expand their skills and oppor-
tunities. The
program
links young people by
computer
to
college students who serve as a
resource
on academics, colleges and careers.
This past fall Joel recruited six Marist students
and one of his
professors to join him
as one of
these volunteer "cyberguides."
Web site development was also
part
of his
2000 summer
internship.
As an
intern
with
the National
Hockey
League,
he
created and
updated
Web
pages.
Joel
had distinguished himself before
com-
ing
LO Marist
in other ways
besides
creating
his own Web site.
He received
the Monsignor
Brann
Award
from
his
high
school, Saint
Agnes
Boys High
School, given
to
one student
nominated
by
the faculty for outstanding com-
munity service.
During hissophomore,junior
and senior years at Saint Agnes he was a
counselor
to mentally
handicapped campers
in
Esopus, N
Y. During his junior
and senior
BY LESLIE BATES
Future plans for
the
Web
site include
incorporating
as a business, com-
ing up
wi1.h a bicycle clothing line and
connecting with major
biking manufacturers
to sell their
products
through the site.
For
now, KnowGoappears
to bea labor of
love for
the
brother:s,
inspired by
memories
of their
bike rides
·with
their
late
father,
Demetrio
Martinez Sr., and pride
in his
entrepreneur-
ship;
he
graduated with a
business
degree
from
Baruch College
and owned a [lower shop
in Grand Central Terminal. While
there
may
be
other sites out there about
biking
in NYC,
"this one
is
more like
between two
brothers,"
Joel
says, "providing information about
them
and what tlhey
do
as well as
helping
other
people
get out there."
Demetrio
Martinez maintains the
Web
site
in
New
York
City while taking computer
classes
and
Joel
writes and
proofreads
copy
for the site while studying in Poughkeepsie.
Although
he
keeps his bike in
his
dorm room,
Joel says
his friends
aren't
into biking.
"As
soon as the weather gets
nice I'm
hoping to
just
take
a day,
maybe
a Saturday or a
Sunday,
and find sonne
new trails,
some
places
around
here that are noteworthy." Then he
may
write
an article for the site on
biking
at college.
Meanwhile, during every break from the school
year, he and
his
brother get t0gether for a
ride.
"I
take my bike
back
home
and we
just
go out
and have
fun."















































KEEPING
up
WITH
MARIST
GRADUATES
Contact Marist
Sean Morrison Becomes
Alumni Affairs Director
Sean Morrison
has
been
named
director of alumni
affairs for
Marist
C,ollege.
He began his duties serv-
ing 20,000 Marist
.alumni
on Jan. 2.
promoting the growth of
the
college. Marist alumni
represent the college
in
all 50
states
and
43
foreign
countries, and the association maintains 13 chap-
ters nationwide. All undergraduate and graduate
degree recipients are
members.
Sean has been a member of the
Marist
family for
five years, workin9 previously in Marist's Athletics
Department where
he rose
from sports information
director to ass is ta
nt
athletic director for external
affairs. Now he orqanizes activities for the Alumni
Association,
advancing its mission of encouraging a
close, supportive
relationship
among alumni and
Alumni can contact Sean at (845) 575-3283 or
Sean.Morrison@Marist.edu
and can keep up with
alumni activities at www.marist.edu/alumni.
1
9 4 B
Dr. Francis
J.
Thomipson
is the
director of the
Facilitator Center at
Pace
University
in BriarcliffManor,
N. Y .. servicing non-public schools
statewide under federal
and
state
contracts.
►a•mNm~
1
9 5
l
Dr. Eugene]. Donnelly
has been
retired
from
teaching f<n
nine
years.
He
and
his
wife, Adirienne,
have
lived
in
Stamford, Conn., for the
past 22 years.
He has
two daugh-
ters
and six grandchildren.
Sean
is a 1993 graduate of Seton Hall University,
where he majored in communications.
1
9 5 2
A
native
of Lawrence, Mass.,
Bro.
Kenneth Marino,
FMS
is serving
in his home area. He
is
in
his
53
rd
year
as
a
Marist
Brother. Brother
Ken
is a
librarian for Central Catho-
lic
High School in
Lawrence.
1 9 5 5
Dr. Michael]. Kelly
teaches
engi-
neering
ethics at UCLA.
He
was
recently
named a Society of Manu-
facturing Engineers Fellow, one of
250
worldwide.
I
Bro. Declan
Murray, FMS
completed 25 years
of teaching religion at Archbishop
Molloy
High
School and celebrated
50 years
as
a Marist Brother
in June
2001.
can Association of Philosophy
Teachers Eastern
Division meeting
in
New
York
City in
December.
His
poetry
has
been
published
in
Cistersian
magazine.
I
Rev. Francis
X. Gallogly
cares for two
parishes:
one on Cape Coral and one on Pine
Island
in southwest Florida. Father
Frank reports that
he
had no diffi-
culty voting for president even
once'
I
Robert
Hopkins
is still
in
the
high school and college
class-
room after
45
years. Two of
his
children are social studies teachers
and one is in veterinary school
at
the
University of
Pennsylvania.
1
9 5 7
By
e-mail:
alu
·@
mni
rnarist.edu
t
Online:
www.marist.edu/alumn·
itJJ'B\Nnt-
---
G. Patrick Gallagher
is working
more exclusively as a police expert
witness,
mostly in pursuit, domes-
tic violence and force cases.
He
and
his wife,
Mary,
run a
bed and break-
fast, the
Wild Geese, in the
Blue
Ridge
Mountains
of southern Vir-
ginia.
I
Bro. George
L.
Mathews
has retired from the driver
educa-
tion
department
at Mount St.
Michael Academy in
Bronx,
N.Y.,
but
is still
involved
in
four
part-
time jobs. He thanks
God for al-
lowing
him
to
be so active at the
age of 80
1
I
Rudolph Ramirez
returned
in late
fall 2000 from the
By mail:
Office of
Al
.
r/alupdat
i
html
M
.
umn1
Af'a·
anst College
i.
irs
3399
Nonh Rd
Poughkeepsie,
NY
12601-1387
By Phone:
(845) 575-3283
28
M
A R IS
T
MAG AZ I N E
1
9 5 6
Professor James P. Friel
is a phi-
losophy coordinator at SUNY
Farmingdale
and editor of Aitia/
Humanities
magazine, the
first
pub-
lication
focused on teaching phi-
losophy
and other humanities.
He
is
a member of the United Univer-
sity Professional
Tech Committee
and chairs
the multicultural
com-
mittee
at SUNY
Farmingdale.
Jim
coordinated
a panel
at the Ameri-































Jubilee Pilgrimage
to Rome,
Italy,
which he attended with his wife,
Denise.and their daughter, Allison.
I
Donald P.
Schmidt
has had a
difficult time staying retired. After
retiring
from
John
F. Kennedy
High
School in 1995, he
taught
at Cen-
tral
Islip High School for several
months. He "retired" from Taconic
Hills
High
School and
traveled
to
Israel and Italy. He was called back
to
Taconic Hills but now has re-
tired
for good. Don serves as an at-
large
member
of
the
Marist Alumni
Executive
Board.
I
Gene Zirkel
(formerly
Bro.
Louis
Francis)
was
honored
by the Junior League of
Long Island as an outstanding vol-
unteer for 2000 at
its
Volunteer
Merit
Awards
luncheon for his work
with
the
homeless through the
Wyandanch Homes and Property
Development
Corp. Gene attended
Marist
in 1954 and 1955 and taught
on the campus for seven summers
from 1959 through 1965.
IBM Names
Ross Mauri '80
to Key Position as
Vice President,
eServer Development
The IBM
Corporation
has named Ross
A. Mauri '80 vice president, eServer
development, providing
leadership
worldwide
for the
hardware
and soft-
ware development of all
IBM
Server
Group systems as well as all Linux
operating system initiatives
for IBM.
The eServer mission, a critical el-
ement of IBM's e-business strategy,
encompasses
the work of employees
in
Austin,
Texas;
Beaverton, Ore.;
Boeblingen,
Germany; Endicott and
Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.;
Raleigh,
N.C.;
Rochester,
Minn.;
and other locations
throughout the world.
1 9 6 0
Gabriel (Bro. Gilbert)
B,ogacia
is
the archivist for Notre
Dame
of
Marbel University in Ko,ronadal,
S.C., Philippines. Koron.adal
has
been his apostolic
community since
April 2000. He is engaged
in
gathering and processing school
records from the past 50 years that
currently are stored in different
departments and colleges of the
university.
lJn,w,-ua
::
1
9 6 1
Daniel
J.
Hanley
reports that his
sixth and youngest child. Teresa
Malia,
finished
Pensacola Catholic
High School
in
May 2000.
1
9 6 2
M.
John O'Connell, Ed.D.
was
named
superintendent of schools
for
the
Wiscasset, Maine, school
district. John retired as
:superin-
Ross
is
also Poughkeepsie
senior
.
,
tendent
of schools for Allegany
County, Md. He lives in Booth Bay
Harbor, Maine, with his wife,
Sandy.
I
Frank Swetz
was a visit-
ing professor at Washington Col-
lege in Chestertown, Md., during
the fall of 2000.
1 9 6 3
Francis
Callahan
was appointed
director of marketing for Bridge-
port Health Care Center
Inc.,
Connecticut's
second
largest
skilled
nursing facility.
I
Bro. John
J.
Cherry
is
the
Catholic chaplain of
the Lutheran Medical Center in
Brooklyn,
N.Y.
I Francis].
(Frank)
Sutton
is still teaching French at
Southwest Vermont Supervisory
Union in Bennington,
Vt., and run-
ning "Sutton's Place,"
a guest house
in
Manchester Center, a great re-
sort area destination.
I
Bro.
Michael B.
Williams,
FMS
is the
recipient
ofthe Bessie
Payne
Award,
the highest honor offered by the
location
executive,
overseeing
the site
Ross Maun SO
and representing
IBM
in the community.
Ross joined IBM
in
1980
after graduating from
Marist with a bachelor's
in
computer mathematics.
Starting as a programmer for the MVS mainframe
operating system, he held various management posi-
tions in the design, development
and quality assurance
of MVS.
In
1993 he went to Paris as director of the
ClienUServer
Computing unit, overseeing strategy
in
Europe, the Middle East and Africa. In 1994
he
was
named
general manager of
IBM
Software Group mar-
keting for Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
servers,,
including
the Generation 5. In 1998 he
led
the worldwide S/390 marketing effort as vice presi-
dent
01'
S/390 solutions and strategy.
In
January
2000 h1!
was
named
vice president, UNIX
software,
overseeiing
the marketing
and development
of
IBM's
UNIX
and Linux
initiatives.
He assumed
his
present
position
in
IBM's Server Group
in
September 2000
and a
nnonth
later was named the senior location
executi'Ve
for Poughkeepsie.
When
he
returned to the United States
in
1995, Ross
was
appointed
technical assistant to
IBM's
chairman
and
CEO.
In 1996 he was named vice president, S/390
global hardware development,
responsible for the de-
livery
of
IBM's
latest
generations of S/390 CMOS-based
Rosi;
is
a member of the Marist College Board of
Trustees.
He
is
also president of the board of direc-
tors for the Open Source Development
Laboratory,
a nonprofit corporation
spbnsored by
leading infor-
mation technology companies.
He
and his wife, Barbara, have two children,
Tyler
and Dale.
MARRIAGES
RobertMennonna ~9
to Judy
Harris,
June 24,
2000
Michael Chung
'82
to Carol Lusignan,
Aug.
19, 2000
Margaret Ann McGovern
'83
to Michael Carl Withers,
Dec. 2, 2000
John M. Donovan '84
to Sharon
Marie Ashley,
June
25,
2000
Denise H. Dilg
'85
to
Donald D.
Brown, Esq, '68,
Dec. 31, 1999
Pauline
Kava
'85
to Mark Ascenzo,
Oct.
17,
1999
Michael J. Stringer '85
to Susan
L. Cuomo,
Sept. 25,
1999
Robert A. McDonald
'86
to Renee
M. Angers,
Sept. 29,
2000
Michael Cozzolino
'87
to
Robin
Field,
April
1,
2000
Timothy Curry '87
to Lysa
Milne, Sept.
9, 2000
Daniel E. Sullivan '87
to Colleen
Keady,
June 19,
1999
Kevin T. Wade '87
to Erin
Hagan,
Oct. 30, 1999
Robert E. O'Connor, Jr. '88
to Clare Morallo, Jan. 2,
1999
Alice Chahbazian
'89
to Warren
Mateychak,
Sept.
23,
2000
Mark Dettlinger
'89
to Jennifer
Riha, May 20, 2000
Lisa Meo '89
to Mark DiRenzo,
Oct. 7, 2000
John M. O'Kane
'89
to
Gretchen
Glaser,
June
16, 2000
Rosemary
Bianculli
'90
to Michael
Taylor,
Sept. 24, 2000
Loriann Bonati '90
to
Patrick Close '90,
Nov, 11,
2000
Kathleen Duffy '90
to Peter
Korzeriewski,
March
11,
2000
Lisa Haag
'90
to Paul W. Day, March 18, 2000
James Reynolds
'90
to Diane
C.
Cosman,
April 29, 2000
S U
M M E R 2
0 0
1
29








































Alumni
I
A!
MARRIAGES
Debra
Alleva '91
to Kenneth
Kirby, Oct.
14, 2000
Kevin Brennan
'91
to
Taryn
Miller, July
15,
2000
Allison Campilii '91
to James
(Jay)
Sapp,
Oct.
21, 2000
Nicole
Carretta
'91
to John R.
Roesset,
Oct.
16, 1999
Sheila
A.
Clancy '91
to
Martin O'Donnell,
Oct.
23, 1999
Nancy
Collins '91
to
Michael
Csorba,
Feb.
20, 2000
Sharon
Driscoll
'91
to
Richard
Spiers,
Dec.
4,
1999
Christine Mccaffery
'91
to
James
Wright Deter, Jr. Oct.
16,
2000
James
Maroney
'91
to Candace
Garcia,
May
6, 2000
Christine Martel
'91
to Gary
Harnos,
Sept.
30, 2000
Ilse
Martin
'91
to
Luke
O'Brien,
Sept.
23, 2000
Elizabeth Ann Masterson
'91
to Gregg
Decker
Beloff, Nov.
27,
1999
Julie
A. McBride '91
to
Donald
A. Stepp,
May
28, 2000
Beth
Prestiano
'91
to
Christofer
Dalis,
Oct.
21, 2000
Jennifer Shotter '91
to
Michael
Mignano,
June
24, 2000
Jon
Cerabone '92
to Dr. Jeannine
E.
Bergen,
Aug.
12, 2000
David A. D' Arco '92
to Patricia
Austin, Oct.
16,
1999
Christine Dooley '92
to John
Sheehan,
June
3, 2000
Kevin P. Francis
'92
to
Constance
Mosesian,
June
10, 2000
Eric Gehnrich
'92
to
Tracey
Martone.
May
15, 1999
Courtney Glennon '92
to Don Richards,
May
1,
2000
Lisa
L.
Marsella
'92
to Brian Ferguson,
Sept.
4,
1999
30
M A R I S T M A G A Z
I
N E
board of directors of the Associa-
tion for Retarded Citizens of
Dutchess County. Each year the
board recognizes leaders in
the
community for
their
se:rvice. Bro.
Michael is a campus minister al
Marisl.
1 9 6 4
James
E.
Patrick, Ph.D.
is group
director of Schering-Plough Phar-
maceuticals
in Kenilworth,
N.j.
1
9 6 5
Dennis].
Feeney
and several class-
mates had a wonderf1ul reunion
with Father Aldo Tos, pastor of St.
Joseph's Church in Greenwich
Vil-
lage,
N.Y. FatherTos wa1sa
lecwrer
in Sacred Doctrine at Marist Col-
lege in the early 1960s.
I
John
Guiliano retired
as administrator
for the New York State Office of
Mental Retardation and Develop-
ment Disabilities in M:arch
1999.
His wife, Dee, a registered
nurse,
retired in
October 1999. They
re-
located to Frederick, Md., where
John works part-time as a
health-
care consultant and his oldest
daughter
is a
physical therapist and
a
health-care
consultant.
His
youngest daughter is an attorney
in
Philadelphia, Pa.
I
Peter P.
Hollenstein
has
retire:d
after 34
years in public education.
He is
an
adjunct professor at Nassau Com-
munity College in Ga1rden City,
N.Y.
I
Dr. Robert McMahon
re-
tired from IBM Kingston
in 1987.
He moved from
Dutchess
County
to Canajoharie
in
Montgomery
County and became
town
supervi-
sor and two-term chairman of the
county
legislature.
I
Pauil
R.
Maher,
Esq.
is
practicing
law
in Saratoga
County. He
is involved
in family
court, indigent defense and ap-
peals and prosecuting medical mis-
conduct cases on behalf of
the
New
York State Department of Health.
I
J.
Brien O'Callaghan
1presented
a
full-day
institute
at the annual con-
ference of the American Associa-
tion for Marriage and Family
Therapy
in
Denver, CoLo., on Nov.
2, 2000.
The
topic of
tbe
presenta-
tion was "Student Shooters: Pre-
dictable, Explainable,
Preventable."
A
member
of
the
Colorado State
Board of Education presented with
Brien.
I
Jeremiah
Sheehan
retired
in
June 2000after 31 ye:ars
of
teach-
ing
and coaching
in
tht:
Red
Hook
(N.Y.) Central School district.
I
Ronald
Streck's
son,
Ryan,
is a
member of Marist's Class of 2001
A Beachcomber
Finds Buried Treasure:
a Class Ring Lost for 21 Years
Twenty-one
years ago
Kevin
Barry
'78 lost his Marist
class ring
swimming in the waters of Point Lookout
off Long
Island,
N.Y.
He
never expected to see it
again. But this past fall,
he
and his ring were
reunited.
In October 2000, a Farmingdale,
N.Y.,
woman,
Elaine Flynn, was
cleaning
her attic and found an old
box of
her
son's treasures from
his
childhood. As a boy,
her son would search the sands of Jones Beach with his
metal detector. In her son's dusty treasure box,
Mrs.
Flynn
found a Class of '78 Marist College ring.
She called Marist to
inquire
about
the
person whose name was
inscribed on the ring: Kevin
Barry.
The MaristAlumni
Affairs office put
Kevin and Mrs. Flynn in touch with each other and
Kevin
now has his
ring back.
"Initially,
I
was stunned when I received the phone call that my
class ring was found after
21 years," said
Kevin,
who lives in
Gaylordsville,
Conn., with his wife,
Joanne
McCullough-Barry
'77,
and their
two
children,
Kevin
and Shauna. "But now
I have
a sense
of restored faith and the thoughtfulness of people."
Kevin
sent Mrs. Flynn
flowers and received a thank-you
note
from
her
in return.
and his, daughter, Kylie, is a sopho-
more.
lEnwiNsK
1
9 6 6
,..
Charles
Barry
retired from
the
IRS
in December
1999.
His daughter,
Cindy,
graduated
from
Manhattanville College in May
2000 with a B.F.A. degree, magna
cum
laude,
and is working as a
graphic designer. His son, Brian,
completed Navy service and at-
tends
college on the
G.I.
Bill.
I
Walter
V.
Behrman, Jr.
reports
that
his daughter, Michelle,
re-
ceived an M.S. in guidance from
Radford
University in Virginia and
his daughter, Allison, received a
B.A.S.
in
theatre and business from
Salve Regina University in New-
port,
RI.
I
Jerome F.
Cuyler,
M.D.
has
been appointed acting medical
directorofRutland Nursing Home,
a 538-bed long-term care facility at
Kingsbrookjewish Medical Center
in Brooklyn,
N.Y.1
Dennis DaRos
is
a senior principal consultant with
the
Kaleel
Jamison
Consulting
Group in
Troy,
N.Y. Dennis lives in
Harpswell, Me.
I
John W. Harl,
Ph.D.
published the article "Walk-
ing in
the
Rainbow" in
the
October
2000 issue of
Science and Spirit
magazine. He was also keynote
speaker at the National Catholic
Rural
Life Conference
Annual Meet
-
ing 2000.
I
Bill Kawka
is presi-
dent of the RMK
Group,
Inc.
which
specializes in business continuity
planning and disaster recovery
planning for large and medium-
size organizations. He may be
reached at
RMKGroup@ATT.net.
Bill is vice president of Penta
Associates, Ltd., a company
that
provides
consulting services
for
business recovery processes to
financial organizations.
I
Bro.
Michael Laratonda
is associate
director of Wellsprings, a sabbati-
cal/renewal program in upstate
New York for Christian ministers
with an emphasis on
holistic
spiri-
wality.
I
James
C.
O'Brien
has
been promoted to computer pro-
gramming department chairman at
the Chubb
Institute
in Westbury,
N.Y
I
John Reilly
retired as prin-
cipal of Mahopac (N.Y.) Middle
School in July 1999.
IJoe
Robillard
writes, "We (he and his wife.Joyce)
are
now
'snowbirds,' retaining our
principal
residence
in
Poughkeepsie but wintering at our
Florida condo at the
lnnisbrook
Golf
Resort."
I
Thomas
Troland
delivered
a presentation (one of six
in 2000) on demographic trends at
the
annual conference of the Travel
Industry
Association on Oct. 28,
2000, at Disneyland in Anaheim,
Calif. Tom is director of market
development for the Meredith
Corp.
I
Terry Youngs
writes
that
"The 2000 alumni
reunion
waster-
rific,
especially the veterans'
trib-
ute. The campus looks great and
the new
library
is fantastic!"
I
Charles Zoeller
is administrator at
Pine Rock Manor, a 70-bed special-
ized dementia
care facility,
in Warner,
N.H.

































l
9 6 7
The
family
of
Philip
Ambrosio
journeyed
to
the Vatican in Octo-
ber 2000 to celebrate
the
canoniza-
tion of
his
granduncle, Alberico
Crescitelli, P 1.M E. priest and
China martyr,
by
Pope
John
Paul
ll.
I
George Gelfer has
been named
vice president
and
general man-
agerof Digital
Express
2000, !KON
Office Solutions'Web-based
docu-
ment
creation,
management
and
delivery
service.
I
Joseph Lallo
is
U.S.
manager
of
litigation
and
claims for Exxon
Mobil
Risk
Management in
Houston, Texas.
I
Anthony LaRocco
retired
from
teaching
on Feb. 1,
1999,
after 32
years.
He
serves on four
boards
of
directors: the
Prescott Fund
for
Children and
Youth,
SAGE,
the
Pines Conservation Society and the
Fire
Island
Pines Arts
Project.
He
lives
in New York City and Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.
I
Ed
Lowe,Jr.
has
received
the Press Club of
Long
Island's Journalist of the
Year
award.
Ed is
associate editor and colum-
nist for
Newsday.
He
also is
the
radio host of "Lowecally Speaking
with Ed
Lowe"
on WLUX 540AM.
I
Fred A.
Policastri
retired from
IBM after 35 years. Fred lives
in
LaGrangeville, N.Y., with
his
wife,
Barbara.
I
Edmond
Roberts
retired in June 2000
from
his
posi-
tion as an English teacher at Red
Hook (N.Y.)
High
School, where
he
taught
for 32 years.
1
9 6 8
Dr.
Lawrence P.
Carr
was ap-
pointed
the
Murata
Dean of
the
F.W. Olin Graduate School of Busi-
ness at Babson College
in
Babson
Park, Mass.
I
Charles A. Di Sogra,
Dr.P.H.,
M.P.H.,
former senior
consultant and director of Health
Sciences
Research
at Freeman,
Sullivan&: Co.,
in
San Francisco,
Calif.,
is
now
the
director of
the
California
Health
Interview Survey
(CHIS) at
the
UCLA Center for
Health
Policy
Research in
Los
Angeles. CHIS surveys 55,000
households
throughout the state
focusing on
public
health
and
access to health care
to
provide
data of
benefit to hospitals
and
other health care
providers,
health
plans and other organizations
in-
volved in
health
care.
I
Charles
Dykas
is regional
manager
for
Cisco
Systems/Federal, responsible for
U.S. Forces/Europe.
He
spends
lots
of time
in Heidelberg,
Germany.
I
John
F.
Forbes
retired after 28
years as a
U.S.
Customs supervi-
sory special agent on Nov. 1,
2000.
He plans on starting a new adven-
ture
this
year!
I
Floyd
T. Holt
was
named
to the
All-USA Today
Teacher Team
for
the United States
and
is
president
of The
Classroom
of
the
Future,
Inc.,
a
non-profit
corporation designed
to
improve
science education
in
the U.S.A. The
project's
Web site
is
www.
spaceshipclassroom.com.
He
was
the
subject
of an article
in
the
Poughkeepsie
Journal
in April
about
his
efforts
to build
a
21
"-Century
Science and Technology Discovery
Center in
Hyde
Park, N .Y.
He
taught
physics
for 32 years at Franklin D.
Roosevelt High
School
in Hyde
Park.
I
Christopher S.
Kelly,
Esq.
was appointed
to
the 13th
Judicial
Circuit Court
by Missouri
Gov. Mel
Carnahan. Prior
to
this appoint-
ment, Chris served as chairman of
the Labor and Industrial
Relations
Commission for
the
state of Mis-
souri.
His
wife, Nanette Laughrey,
is a
U.S.
District Court judge. They
are the
parents
of two clhildren.
I
Dr. Paul Levendusky
is
a naturo-
pathic physician
and
registered
acupuncturist for
the
Peace Arch
Family
Health
Clinic, a comple-
mentary-alternative fam1ily
health
practice
in
White
Rock,
British
Columbia.
In
his practice, Paul is
involved
in
holistic health
care and
writing.
I
The
Rev. Joseph
G.
O'Connell
is
pastor of
the
oldest
Baptist
Church in Virginia
(estab-
lished Oct. 8,
1751),
the
Ketoctin
Church
in Purcellville,
Va. Pastor
Joe
invites
Marist alumni
to
visit
the
church's
Website at
www.
ketoclin.org.
I
Michael Pepe
is
the
English chairperson at !iagamore
Junior
High
School in
Holtsville,
N.Y.
I
David
Schoonmaker
has
moved to
Charlotte, N
.C.,
and
taken
a
new
job as
regional under-
writing manager with
Kemper
In-
surance.
I
Edward
Sulkowski
has
been
appointed
one of the four SAP
software experts
in
the area of
pro-
duction/operations
in the navor
division of International
Flavors
and
Fragrances.
In
May 2000
he
completed
25
years of service with
the
Highlands,
N.J. Volunteer
Fire
Department.
Currently
Ed
serves
as chief of
the
Fire Police.
I
Peter
M. Walsh
co-owns Coog,an's
Res-
taurant at
169'h
Street and
Broad-
way in New York City. H,e and his
partner,
David
Hunt,
recdved the
2000 National
Restaurant
Associa-
tion Best Neighbor Awa.rd.
Rep.
Charles
Rangel
presented the award
to
them
in
the Gold Room of
the
Rayburn House
Office Bu.ilding in
Washington, D.C. Coogan's was
selected from 88 state finalists. The
Restaurant Neighbor awa1rds
pro-
gram was
launched by
the National
Restaurant
Association in 1999
to
recognize
outstanding restaurants
for
the
work they are doing
to
make their communities a
better
place.
Rick
J.
Sampson, president
and CEO of
the
New
York
State
Restaurant
Association, attended
the awards ceremony and said,
"Coogan's is the
neighborhood-a
little United Nations
that binds
its
community in
unparalleled
ways,
setting an example of community
involvement
toward which we
should
all strive."
I
Edward
Weyant
is
the
public
address an-
nouncer
for the Norwich Naviga-
tors,
the
Double A affiliate of the
New York Yankees.
He
teaches
his-
tory at New
London
(Conn.)
High
School.
I
Dorothy
Willis
has
moved to
central
Florida,
where
she
has
been promised that there
will be no
ice
or snow!
1
9 6 9
Harry
Carroll
is a
retired Phoenix,
Ariz.,
police detective. He
reports
that he
is
now
relaxed
and travels
extensively.
I
Richard
Castine
was
promoted to
technology officer
with Chase Manhattan Bank.
I
Dr.
Richard Dickinson
is still
practic-
ing dentistry.
He
also serves on the
board
of directors of New England
Delta
Insurance
Company. His
daughter,
Lindsey, is in law
school
and
his
daughter, Grace, attends
Tufts Dental School. His son, Rich,
graduated
in
June
2000 from
Dartmouth.
I
Patrick]. Keilty,Jr.
planned
to
retire from
the Howard
County (Md ) Public School Dis-
trict in
June
2001. He
is
seeking a
job
with the
Department
of
De-
fense Dependents Schools overseas.
I
Jack Lankard
was the subject of
a lengthy,
full-page
profile in
the
Aug. 10, 2000,
issue
of
Catholic
New
York.
The "Catholic New York-
ers" feature described his career as
a physicist and his
dedication
to
his parish, where
he
taught reli-
_gious
education for 36 years. The
story noted that
he and
his wife,
Joan, have
lived in the same
house
in
Mahopac,
N.Y.,
since
1960,
where
they
raised
their
six chil-
dren.
I
Lt. Cmdr.
Richard Mease!
is teaching earth science at Green
Run High
School and Salem
High
School in Virginia
Beach,
Va.
I
Robert
Mennonna
and
his
wife,
Judy, ran in the Marine Corps
mara-
thon on Oct. 22, 2000, in Wash-
ington, D.C.
I
Vincent]. Mooney
is in his 32
nd
year as an
English
teacher
at Arlington High School
in Poughkeepsie.
His
son, Chris, is
a senior at Union College and his
daughter,
Erin, is a sophomore at
Holy
Cross.
I
Sean O'Neill
was
elected to
a fifth
term as president
of the Guilderland (N.Y.) Teach-
ers' Association, becoming
the long-
est
tenured
president
in the
MARRIAGES
Christine E. Martorana '92
to Peter
Mccann,
July 1,
2000
Maureen Judith McGuire
'92
to E. Christopher
Schmid,
May
20, 2000
Paul Molinari
'92
to
Stephanie
McMenimen,
Sept.
23, 2000
Robert J. Ranieri, Jr. '92
to
Maureen
M. Malone,
Nov.
20,
1999
Diane Raven
'92
to Brian Mclaughlin,
April
8,
2000
Meg Troy
'92
to
John
McCluskey,
Oct. 7,
2000
Laura E. Ulbrandt
'92
to Dean
J.
DiPierro,
Oct.
31, 1998
Darrin Worrall '92
to
Christine
Constantino,
March
25, 2000
Daniel Becker
'93
to Heather
Hartford,
June
3,
2000
Meredith M. Daniel
'93
to
Thomas
Prowse,
Nov. 27,
1999
Shannon
Dawkins
'93
to Jeff Rapant,
July
1, 2000
Wilbert denOuden
'93
to
Patricia
Madeline
Florez,
Oct.
20, 2000
Patricia Dotzel
'93
to Vito Selvaggi,
Sept.
23, 2000
Ann Ferrante
'93
to
Keith Soutar
'93,
July 15,
2000
Kathleen Kollar '93
to
Brian P. Mccourt '94,
Sept.
11,
1999
Luke Labenski
'93
to Parivash
Javidian,
Aug.
27, 2000
John G. McAuliffe '93
to Karen
Hurson,
April 8,
2000
Ted Morrell, Jr.
'93
to Keira
Buckley,
Aug.
21, 1999
Carolynne
O'Grady
'93
to Brad
Borders,
Oct. 7,
2000
Dianne J. Papa '93
to David
Cagianello,
July
14, 2000
Michele Rubis '93
to
Jeffrey
Francisco,
Feb.
26, 2000
Emery R. Sullivan
'93
to
Kevin
P.
O'Connor
'92,
Oct. 8, 1999
SUMMER
2001
31

















































Alumni
A
MARRIAGES
Amy E. Wegman
'93
to Drew
Forsythe,
Nov. 25, 2000
Jodie Woods '93
to
Santo
Pacheco,
Jr., July 24, 1999
Mark Bennett
'94
to Michele
Seigerman,
Sept. 10, 2000
Jennifer Bommelje
'94
to William Maxwell
Butler,
July 8, 2000
Margo S. Demski
'94
to
Michael
Coble,
Aug. 12, 2000
Marisa Nicole DiGrazia
'94
to
Michael Stephen Milo, Jr. '95,
Sept.
4, 1999
Maria Dryer
'94
to
Eric Slabaugh,
Oct. 9, 1999
Lisa Ehrgott '94
to Alexies
Cancel,
May 15, 1999
Robert Farrier, Jr.
'94
to
Clarissa
Starr,
Oct. 21, 2000
Emily Girard
'94
to Tony
Gregory,
April 29, 2000
Jennifer Guzman
'94
to Attilio V.
La
Pietra,
May 1, 1999
Bruce A. Harris
'94
to
Corrie
Dietrich,
Nov.
4,
2000
Scott F. Khare
'94
to
Claudine
M.
Flowers,
July
1,
2000
Janeen Lake-Piano
'94
to
Ray Dolan,
Sept.
8,
2000
Chantal Marie Pecourt
'94
to John
Paul Daigneault,
July 15, 2000
Daniel Phalen '94
to Kathleen
Rayl,
May 13, 2000
Gary Prophet
'94
to
Michelle
Cohen,
Oct.
10, 1999
Debbie Schnarr
'94
to
Chris
McKeough,
July 29, 2000
Christine H. Staats, Esq.
'94
to
Patrick
D.
Guido,
Jan.
16, 2000
Marcella Rose Touma '94
to
Kenneth
Michael
Racioppi,
July
2 2, 2000
David William Triner
'94
to
Annette
Lee Thompson,
May 13, 2000
Joan Wietrzykowski
'94 to
William Ferguson
'94,
Feb.
22, 1998
32
M A R I
S
T M
A G A
Z I
N E
association's history.
I
Jerry G.
Patrick
is
executive di1rector of the
American
Hearing;-lmpaired
Hockey Association, affiliated with
U.S. Hockey. At this y,ear's annual
convention in Chicago he received
the highest award given to any staff
member, the Gunzo Award. Its
in-
scription reads,
"He
gave of him-
self."
1
9 7
0
Richard Bruno, Sr.
is director of
network planning at Net work Plus
in Quincy, Mass. He~
has
been
awarded four new patents in the
telecommunications and Internet
industry.
I
In
Jum:,
Stephen
Caramore
completed
30
years of
teaching English in
the
Patchogue-
Medford
(N.Y.)
School District.
I
Anthony
Di
Stasio's
daughter,
Amy, received a B.S.
in
chemical
engineering from Lehigh Univer-
sity. She is now a proc,ess engineer
for Air Products and chemicals in
Allentown, Penn.
I
Bill
Dourdis
is
editor-in-chief of
the
Wappingers
Falls
(N.Y.)
Congress of Teachers
Commentator,
a biweekly newslet-
ter for nearly
800
teachers and 400
retirees. The newsletter has won
New York State United Teachers
and American
Federation
of Teach-
ers awards for genera I excellence
in
journalism.
I
Cmdr. John j.
Michael McC,nrthy
'82
Promoted
to l~VP at
Madison Squc11re
Garden Netwo1rks
Michael McCarthy
'82
has
been pro-
moted
to executive
vice·
president
and
executive
producer for Madison
Square
Garden
Netwo1rks.
Kren USN (Ret.)
is in a four-year
program
to
become a permanent
Deacon
in
the
Diocese
of Rich-
mond, Va. John is a special educa-
tion
teacher
in the Tidewater
De-
tention School in Cheasepeake, Va.
I
Dr.
Douglas
Stuart,
professor of
political science and director of the
Clarke Center at Dickinson Col-
lege in
Carlisle, Pa., was recently
appointed adjunct professor at
the
U.S. Army War College.
]P1m
1
N~C
~
1
9 7
1
Robert Bergin
has been appointed
assistant principal at Carmel High
School in Carmel, N.Y. Bob's e-mail
address is
bbergin
7@hotmail.com.
I
Phil Heasley
is chairman and CEO
of First USA. Formerly, he was
president and CEO of U.S. Bancorp.
I
Rev.
Patrick McSherry
is in
his
fifth year as director of communi-
cations at the headquarters of the
Capuchin
Franciscan
Order
in
Rome, Italy.
I
Dr.
Richard Micoli's
daughter, Catherine, graduated
from
Marist in May 2001,
"just
30
years" after his graduation.
I
Jack Paluszek
is president of Ad-
vanced Management Development
Institute,
which facilitates a man-
agement development program
("bullet-proof manager training")
in Newburgh, N.Y., and Mahwah,
N.J.
I
Patricia Rittenhouse
teaches
seventh- and eighth-grade Spanish
at St.
Joseph's
School in Auburn,
N.Y.
I
Joseph
Rubino
founded
Health Trans, Inc., now the
largest
provider of non-emergency medi-
cal
transportation
in Florida, in
1983.
In 2000 he became the
first
person outside the medical profes-
sion ever
to
be elected to
the
board
of directors of the South
Florida
Hospital Association.
ljohn
Ryan
received a Ph.D. in biochemistry
from the University of Connecti-
cut in 1997. He
is
manager of sci-
entific affairs at Coming,
Inc.
in
Acton, Mass.
I
Robert Ullrich
has
started
his
own consulting firm
after living
in
Michigan for nine
years. He specializes in informa-
tion
technology
and process man-
agement. He and his wife, Diane,
have three children. Bob
reports
that
he
is looking forward to the
30
1
h
class reunion of the Class of
'71
this October.
1 9 7
2
William N.
Anderson
earned a
doctorate in management
from
Rutgers University. The title of his
dissertation was
Cultural
Values
and
Communication
Mode: A Study of
Culturally Homogeneous
and Cul-
turally Heterogeneous
Groups.
Bill
is
assistant vice president for enroll-
ment planning at the New Jersey
Institute of Technology, where he
is also an adjunct professor in
the
Computerand Information Science
Department.
I
Gary
Barrack
was
reelected to an eighth term as presi-
dent of the National
Treasury
Em-
ployees Union, Chapter 61, repre-
senting
Internal
Revenue Service
I
Sports
Net
(FSN).
···
Prior
to
his September
appoint-
!
ment, Mike
spent
the previous
four
-
years as
the
senior vice president
and
executive
producer
of
the
MSG
Network.
In
that
position, he over-
saw
the production of all
Metro
New York
professional
sports
tele-
casts on both the MSG and FSN
networks. An innovator in
cable
broadcasting, the
McCarthy-led
MSG
network
began
broadcasting
original
home
games
in HDTV
in
1998,
becoming the
first
cable
sports network
to
use HDTV
tech-
nology.
Since
1991
Mike,
who
began
his tenure
with the network as a student
intern
in
1982,
has received
numerous
accolades
for his
accomplish-
ments including
18
New
York
Emmy
awards and a
coveted
CableAce
Award for coverage
of
Rangers
hockey
during the
1993-94
season.
One of
the
most
respected
and
creative
people
in spo,rts
television,
Mike has
been the driving force
be-
hind the networks'
rise
as the
premier
carrier of
regional
sports program-
ming.
In his new capa,city,
he
serves Michael McCarthy
'82
as
the curator of
new media
for
all
of
Madison
Square
Garden's
divisions, including the
network,
the
arena complex
and
its teams,
and Radio
City
Entertainment.
The
new
media
divi:;ion
includes
the Garden's
Web
activities;
the arena's "Choice
Seats"
program
which
puts instant
replay at
the
fingertips
of
seat holders;
and the
networks'
future
launch
of
interactive
set-top
television
boxes that will eventually
allow viewers
to
"call
the
shots" as the~1watch
games
on
MSG
and Fox
A
resident
of Fairfield,
Conn.,
Mike and his wife,
Allison
'83,
have
two children,
Jeremy
and
Maggie.
-Sean
Morrison



































employees
in
upstate
New
York.
I
Emmett M.
Cooke is
senior
direc-
tor
of
channel
and alliance sales for
CES
International
in
Alpharetta,
Ga.
I
Paul].
Curtin,Jr.
has been
selected
to
serve as legal counsel
to
the Camillus, N.
Y., Planning
Board.
He was profiled
in
the
Syracuse,
N.Y.,
Post-Standard
on
July
20,
2000.
I
Frank
Gerbes
and
his
wife
celebrated
their 29'h
wedding an-
niversary on Aug.
28,
2000, and
one year
as business partners
in
Gerbes
&:
Gerbes,
Realtors.
I
Gary
W.
Griffen
won the Gold Camera
Award at the U.S.
International
Film
Festival for his
television
special
"Moose: SpiriL of the North Woods."
Gary is a self-employed wildlife
film
producer
for Griffen
Produc-
tions
as well as a producer for the
Discovery
Channel.
I
Bill Haedrich
received
a master's
in
divinity from
Loyola
University
in
Chicago.
He is
a
pastoral
associate in
Evanston,
Ill.
I
William
Haggerty,
his wife,
Mary,
and
their
four children have
set deep roots in Colorado. Over
the past few years
they have
be-
come
irrational
Celtophiles,
Laking
the
whole family
to
Ireland twice.
He
is a staff manager with Lucent
Technologies.
I
John
Keenan's
daughter,
Kristen, is
a member of
the
Marist Class of 2004.
He
re-
cently retired from the position of
director
of the Defense Criminal
Investigative
Service.
I
Bryan M.
Maloney
was
inducted
into
the
Sports
Museum
of Dutchess
County's
Hall
of Fame on Oct. 6,
2000, for his contribution to
local
athletics. Bryan
played
slow-pitch
softball with
the
Aqua
Kings in the
Apple Valley softball league. For
the
last
10
years
he
has played
baseball and is player/manager of
the
Beekman
Cardinals in the
Beekman Men's Senior Baseball
league,
of which
he is
also vice
president.
He
is major gifts officer
for
the
Bank Street College of Edu-
caLion
in
New
York,
NY. Bryan
is
a member of the Marist College
Alumni Executive
Board
and was
the
director of alumni affairs at
Marist
from 1982
to
1986.
I
Dr.
Brian Minasian
was invited to be
the
keynoLe
speaker at Marist Col-
lege
for inductees
into
Psi Chi, the
national
Psychology
Honor
Soci-
ety, last year.
I
Robert D. Muni
is
a founding
member
of the Online
MarkeLing Practice at Colin
&:
Wolfe, which is
part
of
the
Young
&Rubicam family.
I
Bill
and Carol
Welz
Porter's
son,
Kevin,
gradu-
ated from Marist in May 2001.
Their
daughter, Kristen, is
a member of
the Class of 2003.
I
Michael
An-
drew
Smith is Lhe
author of
Busi-
ness to Business
Golf:
How
to
Swing
YourWaytoBusinessSuccess.
lt was
published
by
lnfoPro P·ublishing
in February
200 l.
1
9 7 3
Dr.
Dana
L.
Delaware
is associate
division head
of science a1t
Truman
State University
in Kirksville,
Mo.
I
Brian
P.
Doyle
has
be,~n named
associate executive
director
of the
Ulster-Greene Association of Re-
tarded Citizens.
I
Richard
P.
Freccia
received
an educational
specialist
degree
(post-master's)
in
counseling
from Rider
University.
He is a school counselor at Allen-
town (N.j.) High Schooll. He
also
works as a statistician and stage
manager
for ESPN.
Rich
lives in
East Windsor, N,J., with
his
wife,
Maria.
I
P. Michael Karkowski
has
been named chief financial of-
ficer
of
the
Ulster-Greene Associa-
tion of Retarded Citizeni;.
I
Rich-
ard
A.
Kohrumel
is regional ac-
counting/budget manag,er
in the
Office of Thrift Supervisi.on, a
bu-
reau
of
the
U.S. Department of
the
Treasury,
in
Atlanta, Ga. Married
14
years,
he has three
children:
Tim,
age
13, Rachel, 9, and Sarah,
4. He
is
founder
and director of the
Catholic Men's Fellowship
in
At-
lanta,
Ga.
I
David
Lyons
is the
director
of civil service ad ministra-
tion
for Ulster County,
N.Y.
He
and
his
wife,
Judy,
are
the proud
grandparents
of
Lexi
Leighann
Lyons, born June 30, 2000.
I
Michael Marso
was selected So-
cial Studies department chair for
the Sherburne/Earlville
(NY.)
Cen-
tral
School
District. His
daughter,
Emily,
graduated
magna
cum laude
with honors from
Brown
Univer-
sity in May 2000. She
now
attends
the Yale
School
ofDivinity.1
Stuart
Neil
began a
new medical
training
company for nurse's
aides. His
daughLer, Jaime,
began
her junior
year in high school
in
an
interna-
tional baccalaureate
program.
I
Raymond
A. Sander
has. been
se-
lected
scout executive
for
the
Hiawatha Seaway Council of
the
Boy Scouts of America.
The
coun-
cil serves five central and
northern
New York counties.
Raymond
has
worked
in
seven
different
Scout
Councils
over
his 26-year career
with the Boy Scouts.
I
Capt.
Michael
Scacchi, USNR is
com-
manding
officer of a unit
that
re-
ports to the
commander-in-chief
of the Pacific Fleet. The
unit
ana-
lyzes
aircraft and surface ship cost
management.
As a civilian, Mike is
director
of customer
delivery
at
Hitachi
Innovative Solutions Cor-
poration in Oakley, Calif.
I
Jack
C.
Simeone, Ph.D.
is associate ex-
ecutive
director
of Cat ho
I ic
Chari-
ties
of Albany and
Rensselaer
coun-
ties
in upstate New York. He also
serves
on the faculty at
Hudson
Valley Community
College.
I
Michael Ward
has been
appointed
executive
director
of the Arizona
Governor's
Council
on Develop-
mental
Disabilities. He lives in
Phoenix, Ariz.
1
9 7 4
Eleanor
Rundie
Bockley
and
her
husband, Karl, celebrated
their fifth
wedding anniversary with
a two-
week trip to France. Elly's
daugh-
ter,
Alison,
is
engaged and plans a
200
l wedding. Elly serves
as
an
at-
large member
of the Marist College
Alumni Executive Board.
I
Bro.
Robert
S. Clark,
FMS
has been
elected
provincial of the
Province
Bro. Donnell
Neary,
FMS
Bro.
Robert
S.
Clark,
FMS
of Esopus for the Marist Brothers.
Elected
vice provincial in 1998,
Brother Rob
will assume
his
duties
as
provincial
in
November 2001.
Bro. Donnell
Neary, FMS has
been
elected
Provincial
of the Pough-
keepsie Province of the Marist
Brothers.
Ijames
R.
Condon
splits
his
time between
New York City
and Sullivan County, N.Y.
His
wife,
Margot,
has been
a
nurse
at NYU
Medical Center for
24
years and his
son, Sean,
is
a sophomore at
Phila-
delphia
University, majoring
in
ar-
chitecture. Son Neil is a sopho-
more at
Bergtrum High
School
in
New York, N.Y.
I
Robert
Gurske
has completed
L
wo years of forma-
tion LOward becoming
a deacon
and will be
installed
as
a
reader.
I
Dr.
Susan
P. Kelly
was promoted
to
district coordinator of English
for the
five
high
schools
in the
Sewanhaka (N.Y.) School
District.
She
is
also
the
president of
the
Long
Island
Language Ans Coun-
cil and secretary of
the
New
York
State English Council.
I
John
Markle
sells Lexmark printers and
supplies
to
national accounts. His
wife, Sally, works for IBM Global
Services
in
Lexington, Ky. Emily,
their 11-year-old
daughter, wants
to
visit
the
Marist campus.
I
Claudia
Olson's
son, Michael
J.
Olson, graduated in Marist's Class
of
2000.
I
Marjorie
White
MARRIAGES
Sylvia Jane Beyer '95
to Mark
Thomas
Isham,
June
4, 2000
Laurie
Bianchi '95
to Matthew Pirog, Nov. 5, 1999
Kathryn Castle '95
to Lawrence
Maestas,
Aug.
28, 1999
Lisa Gelormino '95
to John Munson,
May
12,
2000
Marie Elaine Meehan '95
to Gerald
J.
Komisar,
Feb.
19, 2000
Thomas Meehan '95
to Jelam
Mehta,
Sept. 29, 2000
Sean Christopher
Murphy '95
to
Kathleen
Marie
Purcell,
May 29, 1999
Chastity Nadge '95
to Don Jaynes,
Aug. 26, 2000
Colleen Pelkowski
'95
to James
Collins,
May 1, 1999
Joann
Puma
'95
to Walter
Pfaffenberger,
July
22, 2000
Gina Rugilio '95
to
Joe Papeo '95,
June
24, 2000
Laurie Ann Sieving '95
to
Gregory
William
Frith,
Dec. 11,
1999
Jennifer Sito '95
to Richard
Conley,
June 12,
1999
Lisa Valentini '95
to Bibek
Ghosh,
Aug. 5, 2000
Sarah Venezia '95
to Dean
Pinto,
April 29, 2000
Tara (apple '96
to
Timothy
Hannan,
June
3, 2000
Raul De La Rosa '96
to
Nelly Ravelo,
July
2, 2000
Lynn Dominick
'96
to
Scott
Sager,
Sept.
23, 2000
Megan K. Dowden
'96
to
James F. Tolfree '96,
Nov. 13,
1999
Nicole Foster '96
to
Ramon Hache '96,
Sept.
5,
1998
Jennifer Groot '96
to
David
Brown,
Feb. 1,
2000
Meredith Kennedy
'96
to
Bryan Andrews
'96,
Sept. 16,
2000
SU M M E
R 2 0 0 I
33








































Alumni
A
MARRIAGES
Jeanne
Marie
Mendler '96
to
Eugene
P.
Pavlik,
Oct. 21, 2000
Norie Mozzone '96
to
Erik
Molinaro
'97,
July
15,
2000
Meghan A. O'Neill '96
to
Andrew
T. Currier,
Oct.
10,
1999
Kristin
E. Pearl '96
to Kevin
M.
Day, Sept.
30, 2000
Sherri Schneider
'96
to
Salvatore Gugliara '94,
June
11,
2000
Michelle Elizabeth
Tallardy
'96
to Matthew Becker,
Feb. 26, 2000
Anne
Tanner
'96
to
Gregory
Arent, Sept.
3,
2000
Leslie Wacker
'96
to Hanna
Ostaszewska,
Sept.
8,
2000
Kristin M. Wengert
'96
to
Terence
Daly,
June
17,
2000
Sarah Winch '96
to
Stephan
Kalman,
Nov.
21,
1998
Andrew Caprioli
'97
to Ann-Marie
Malena,
July
1,
2000
Stacie Castella
'97
to
Brian Lynch,
May 6, 2000
Kara
V. Defeo
'97
to William Brodsky,
Sept.
3, 2000
Jennifer De Marco
'97
to Michael
Nyhuis,
Aug. 11, 2000
Shannon Fitzpatrick
'97
to
SSG
David H.
Owen,
July
1,
2000
Kristen S. Galyon
'97
to
Kevin
C.
Doyle,
Aug. 5, 2000
Natalye Gilleran
'97
to
Christopher
Moss,
Oct. 15,
2000
Michael McDowell
'97
to
Suzanne
Folkerts '96,
July
29,
2000
Carolyn Peguero
'97
to
Steven
Spencer,
July 22, 2000
Jo-Ann
Piezzo
'97
to
J.
Patrick
Holmes,
Aug. 26, 2000
Stephanie Raider
'97
to
Colin Sullivan,
July
29, 2000
Kim Showers
'97
to
Marc Tracey
'97,
Oct.
21, 2000
34
M A R
I
ST
M
A G A 2
I
N E
Pellegrino's
program,
Owl and
Panther: Writing
from
the
Dark-
ness,
received
funding
last
year
through a National Endowment for
the Arts Creative
Links
grant.
I
Bryan Tarsa
joined
Allied
Digital
in
Hauppauge,
N.Y.,
as; production
manager.
1
9 7 5
Charlotte
Ballinger
reports that
she still lives at 11 Lo•NTI
Court in
Poughkeepsie and
ha:;
six grand-
children. She no long€:r drives
but
is still going stron,g!
I
Lynn
Bassanese
has been
appointed di-
rector of
public
programs at the
Franklin
D.
Roosevelt
Presidential
Library
and Museum. Lynn started
working at the library in 1972 as
a
pan-time
archives aide while
attending Marist.
I
!Rev.
James
Browning
is associate
CPE
supervisor for the Ass,ociation for
Clinical Pastoral Education.
He
is
director of pastoral
ministry at
Bethany
Village Retirement Center
in Mechanicsburg,
Pa.
I
Mary E.
Cronin
recently was privileged to
join the
Lighthouse '.;ingers
in
a
concert at the Metropolitan Mu-
seum of Art
in
New York City.
I
Brian
Donnelly
has
st.arted a com-
pany called
Lifespan
tthat
designs
and manufactures products for
elders and people with disabilities.
I
Lt. Col.
Thomas Herman,
USA,
is assigned to the White
House
as a
presidential communications of-
ficer. He
is the
director of special
services for
the
White
House
Mili-
tary Office. Tom
resi,des
in Lake
Ridge, Va
,
with his wife,
Jill,
and
three
children, Sean, Kate and
Aedan.
I
John Janci's
son, Chris-
topher,
is a graduate o,f Duke
Uni-
versity, Class of 2000
1•
I
Edward
Kissling
has been
promoted
to as-
sociate professor of
business
and
legal studies at Ocean County Col-
lege
in Toms River,
N
.J.
~Um!Nlr:=:
1
9 7 6
Kenneth
Barger
has been pro-
moted to chief technology officer
of
the Hartford
Insurance Group.
He lives
in Bristol, Conn., with his
wife,
Joan
Guzy
Barger '76,
and
their
two children.
I
Richard
Bartholomew
is a soc'ial worker at
Taconic
DDSO in Pou,ghkeepsie.
I
Frank De
Koskie,
Jr.
is
a consult-
ant on national
recruiting
programs
to PeopleSoft, Inc.
His
daughter,
Leah,
is
a junior at
the
University of
Georgia.
I
Larry
L
Hurley
retired
from
IBM
after 30 years of service.
He then
worked for MiCRUS for
five years. He
now
works for
Philips
Semiconductors, which
purchased
MiCRUS.
"It's
very exciting work-
ing for
Philips
in the beginning of
the
consumer digital electronics and
wireless revolution," he writes.
I
Kathleen Manning
is the
author of
Rituals, Ceremonies, and Cultural
Meaning
in
Higher
Education,
pub-
lished
by Bergin
&
Garvey of
Westport, Conn. Kathleen is an
associate professor at the Univer-
sityofVermont.
I
Kathryn
Nathan
Marcus
has
returned to graduate
school at Mercy College for certifi-
cation in elementary education.
I
Brian). Morris
completed his
lO'h
marathon
in
New
York City on
Nov. 5, 2000. His running
time
was 3:46:49. Brian is corporate
partner
for Dewey Ballantine
in
New
York,
N.Y.
He lives
in
Ridgewood,
N.J., with his wife,
Mary
Jo Tracy
'77,
and
their
three
children.
I
Ernest).
Puglisi
moved
to
Houston, Texas, in August 1999
to
accept a position as vice presi-
dent
of technology for National
Title
Services of Stewart Title Guar-
anty.
I
John M. Reilly
is a captain
with the
New
York Police Depart-
ment in
New
York, N.Y. John
completed 20
years
of service
in
September 2000.
1
9 7 7
Barbara Bella
and her husband,
John Baccagline, enjoyed the first
Marist alumni event in San Fran-
cisco,
held
at Pal O'Shea's
Madhatter.
Pat
O'Shea's is owned
by Marist alumnus
Pete
Nesteroke
'66.1
Ellen Benoit
received
a Ph.D.
in sociology
from
New York
Uni-
versity
in
September 2000.
I
Rev.
David Haynes
was ordained as an
Anglican priest
in
May 1999 while
still working full-time as an advi-
sory software engineer with IBM
in
Tucson, Ariz.
He
is rector of Holy
Cross Church in Tucson.
I
Tho-
mas
Price
was named chief operat-
ing
officer of
TlXpert,
a company
that
develops
soft ware for
the
bro-
kerage
industry.
I
Nancy Stormer,
Esq.
was named 1999 Woman of
the Year by
the
YWCA of Mohawk
Valley and was
listed
in
Who's
Who
in
American Women.
Nancy
is
an
attorney in Utica,
N.Y.
I
Mark
Vitale
is president, owner and op-
erator of
Latitude24
Inspection
Services,
Inc.
in Key West, Fla.
1 9 7 8
Vincent
Capozzi
is product man-
ager for the Schott Corporation
and was elected as an officer of
the
Society for
Information Displays.
Vinnie lives
in
Tuxedo Park,
N.Y.,
with
his
wife,
Noreen Fennell
'78,
and
their
two children. Noreen
is
president
of E Pluribus Maxim
us,
a
publishing firm.
I
Debra Bowers
Citrone
has
left
her
position at the
former
Republic
National Bank to
open her own business,
DC
Con-
sulting, an educational consultant
group with a particular emphasis
on financial
literacy.
I
Cmdr.John
W. Covell is the
commanding
officerofVAW-113,also known as
the
world-famous Black
Eagles,
deployed
on board
the
USS
Abraham
Lincoln,
which has been
deployed to the Arabian Gulf en-
forcing U. N. sanctions. The squad-
ron Website is
www.
VAWl
13.com.
John's daughter, Erin, attends
Marist and is interested in English
asa
major.
Since
English
was John's
major, he feels he
is
doing his part
to keep Marist and the English
programaliveand well! When st.ate-
side,
John
hails
from
Thousand
Oaks, Calif., with
his
wife,
Maureen, and their
five
children.
I
Kristin
Jane
Keller, daughter of
Virginia Heaton Keller
and the
late
Robert
Keller
'80, will be at-
tending Marist on a full basketball
scholarship in September 2001.
I
Sam
Leuerii
was appointed assis-
tant
principal
of Poughkeepsie
Middle School.
I
Steven
R. Meier
has been appointed chief of fiscal
services at Anderson School
in
Staatsburg,
N
.Y.
I
Duane
A. Smith
is a stockbroker with
Investor's
Discount in Poughkeepsie. He pre-
viously was an
investment
advisor
with David Lerner Associates in
White Plains, N.Y.
I
Ellen Burnett
Woods
was awarded an M.S.T. in
elementary education from SUNY
New Paltz.
1 9 7 9
William
Berardi,
a certified pub-
lic accountant,
received
an M.B.A.
from
Marist in
1990.
He received
the designation of registered in-
vestment advisor in fall 2000.
I
Robert T. Brown
has been named
vice chancellor for community col-
leges
by the SUNY Board ofTrust-
ees. He ser\'ed as president of
Ul-
ster County Community College
from 1974
to 1997 and has been
deputy
to the
chancellor for com-
munity colleges since 1998.
I
Mary
Beth
Carey
was interviewed
in the
April 21, 2000, edition of
Long
Island
Business
News
about her work
as vice president of enrollment ser-
vices at Hofstra University.
I
Kathleen Yanarella Hall's
biogra-
phy has been
included
in
Who's
Who of American Women Millen-
nium Edition
2000-01.
Kathy is
busi-
ness operations manager for
IBM

































in Research Triangle Park, N.C.
I
Ingrid Cappelli Kulick
has joined
the firm of Wade Associates
in Hyde
Park, N
.Y.,
as senior associate.
Previously
Ingrid
was executive
di-
rector of
the
Kingston Hospital
Foundation.
I
Robert McAndrew
and
his
wife,
Judy McE!duff
McAndrew
'82,
live
in Mendham,
N.J., with their four children,
Patrick, Molly, Deirdre and Sheila.
I
Joyce Munn joined the
NewYork-
based global executive search firm
Teeman Perley Gilmartin as a Japa-
nese
specialist.
I
Dennis O'Neill
was promoted
to
vice president/
publisher of
Editor & Publisher
magazine, a division of VNU Busi-
ness
Media, Inc.
I
Patricia Wilson
Pahmer is
a
full-time
mom to
daughter, Sidney,
7,
and stays very
involved
in
Sidney's elementary
school. Patricia
lives
in
Ridgefield,
Conn., with
her
family.
I
Carol
Vecchio
is executive director and
co-founder of Centerpoint
Insti-
tute for
Life
and Career
Renewal,
a
career counseling organization that
helps adults and organizations
navi-
gate change to create meaningful
lives and work.
The
institute pro-
vides workshops, retreats and
in-
dividual coaching. Carol has con-
tinued
her
singing and belongs
to
a
Sweet Adelines chorus and
quar-
tet. She and her husband, Dennis,
foster
kiuens from a local pet shel-
ter and enjoy
their
own five cats
immensely.
1
9 8 0
Gerard P. Cavaluzzi, Esq. has
been elected vice president of
Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., a national
firm of independent environmen-
tal
consultants with
headquarters
in White Plains, N.Y. He
has
been
a member of Pirnie's
legal
depart-
ment for 12 years.
I
John A. King
is
commander of
the
Wheaton/
Glenmont District of the
police
department
in Montgomery
County, Md., a suburb of Wash-
ington,
D.C.,
with a population of
855,000. His son,J.J., was invited
to
try
out for Leeds United Football
(Soccer) Academy
in
England.
I
David Ng is
the assistant manag-
ing editor of
The Newark Star Led-
ger
in
Newark,
NJ Dave
reports
that
his daughter,
Isla, is
the
spokeschild
for the Welch's
company.
You can see
her
picture
on the Welch's Web site,
www.welchs.com.
Joan
is the proud
Mom.
I
David W. Powers
has
been named head women's basket-
ball
coach
at Marymount College
in Tarl)•town, N.Y.
I
John
K.
Sisk
joined
Moors and Cabot as vice
president of investments.
I
P.
Wesley Sperry
earned a master of
Betty O'Brien, from the
1968
yearbook
Remembering
Betty O'Brien
Elizabeth "Betty" O'Brien,
the beloved administrator
who helped many a
Marist
student graduate during
the
1960s
and early 1970s,
passed away Nov. 26
in
Poughkeepsie.
She
was 81.
Betty
O'Brien worked
as
recorder
from 1963 to
1972
in what is now the
registrar's
office at
Mari
st.
Bro.
Joe
Belanger, FMS,
says she was part of what made Mari
st
special
in
the 1960s. "We were
family, and the heart of that family was Betty O'Brien.
She
was
'Mother' to all the stude!nts, and like a good mother she loved them all
equally. She would bargain and finagle
forth em
all,
even the
undeserv-
ing, and get them through and launch them on
their careers."
She was a lifetime resident of Poughkeepsie and attended the
former
Eastman Business School. She married John P. O'Brien, who
predeceased
her in
19:70; in 1971
she married Loren O'Brien, who
predeceased
her
in
1994.
Survivors
include
a daughter, Valeda
J. Wagner
of Poughkeepsie;
three sons,
John
O'Brien of
Houston,
Texas; Robert O'Brien of
LaCanayda, Calif.; and James O'Brien of Metarie,
La.; 11
grandchil-
dren; 9 great-grandchildren; and a niece.
Memorial donations may be made to the Saint Marcellin
Champagnat
Lecture
in
Catholic Studies,
care of the Marist College
Advancement Office, D99 North
Rd.,
Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.,
12601.
science degree
in
management from
North
Carolina State Univ,ersity.
~hmtM91
:
1
9 8
1
Karen Ingalls
has
joined the
Chadds Ford, Penn., olTice of
Weichert Realtors as a sales. associ-
ate.
I
Paul Jahn
and
Maribeth
Whitesell Jahn
write that they have
moved into a new house in Latham,
N.Y, with
their
children, Geoffrey
and Emily.
I
Mary Ellen Minze-
Spamo
ran
the
London
Marathon
as a member of
the
Leukemia and
Lymphoma Society's
"Team
in
Training."
The team raises
funds
for leukemia and
lymphoma
re-
search. Mary Ellen is vice president
and compliance counsel for Merrill
Lynch
in
Somerset, N
.J.
She served
for several years as
treasurer
of the
Alumni Executive Board. She
lives
in Belle Mead, NJ., with
her hus-
band, Robert, and their three chil-
dren.
1 9 8 2
Evelyn Ashworth
was promoted
within New York City Transit
to
superintendent. She writes that she
is
enjoying married life
to husband
John and
loving
motherhood
with daughter Emily.
I
Peter
Dychkewich
was named vice
president of human resources
for WorldStreet Corporation
in
Boston, Mass., a developer of
Internet-based
collaborative com-
merce
solutions.
I
Marygrace
Faicco Kyratzis, R.N.,
cares for
gynecology
and obstetrical patients
at Albany Medical Center Hospital
in
Albany, N .Y.
In
March
2000
she
completed cross-training
in
labor
and delivery.
I
Vinnie
McVeigh
has been
promoted
to senior vice
president of merchandising at 1-
800-fiowers.com.
I
Peggy
Nolan
is an account
manager
for
LeaseTeam, the developer of
LeasePlussoftware,
in Omaha, Neb.
I
Mary Alice Russo
has been ap-
pointed chairman of
the
board of
directors
fort he Rensselaer
County
Regional Chamber of Commerce.
Mary Alice received an M. B.A. from
RPI
in
May 2001.
1
9 8 3
Frank Burhance,
his
wife,
Linda
Zemba
'85, and their son,
Noah,
have returned to the Northeast af-
ter
many years in Atlanta, Ga.
They
now
reside
in
Fairfield, Conn.,
MARRIAGES
Dena
Ann Van Lenten
'97
to
Christopher
Renda
'97,
Oct.
21,
2000
Kelly
L. Walsh '97
to
John
Day
'96,
Sept. 16, 2000
Erica Wittman '97
to
Dave Delorey '97,
July
1, 2000
Michael
Blanchette
'98
to Amie Surette,
Oct. 7, 2000
Lisa Ann Casavant
'98
to
David Bruce Hartman
'98,
May 27, 2000
Alisa Franz '98
to
Neill White, May 6, 2000
Kimberly Dawn
Garrett '98
to 2
Lt.
Michael
Lamey,
May
28, 2000
Robert
T. Hoey
'98
to
Rebecca
Sabatos,
May 21, 2000
Erin Patricia
Kuhlow
'98
to Michael
Joseph
Soucy,
Sept. 23,
2000
David
John
Silvia
'98
to Sarah
Jean
Warner,
Oct. 8,
2000
LaToria Sheree
Walker
'98
to William
Lemar
Jones,
Sept. 30, 2000
Jill M. Buzzurro '99
to
Jay C. Rinschler '97,
Oct.
10,
1999
Veronica Finch
'99
to
Derek
J.
Edwards,
Nov.
27, 1999
Christina
Gaudenzi
'99
to
Joseph Cistaro '99,
Aug. 12, 2000
Thomas J. Long, Jr. '99
to
Amber Leigh
Wiercinski,
May 27, 2000
Jamie
Scott
'99
to
Mark
Conway '98,
July 14, 2000
Amy
Elizabeth Andrews '00
to Caleb
Rose,
June 10,
2000
Megan E. Bihn '00
to
Justin J.
Hawkins
'00,
June
3, 2000
Thomas
W.
Burghardt
'00
to Kelly
Allison Scott,
July
8, 2000
Marguerite
(Margo)
Henninger
'00
to
Michael Musgnug '00,
July
22,
2000
Joshua P.
Matheus
'00
to Carolyn
Ware,
June
3, 2000
SU M M ER 2 0 0 I
35

































tial profitable
CitiBusiness seg-
ments,
implements
sales/market-
ing plans
and
leverages
referral
sources
for new businesses. He
is
pursuing
the
Certified Financial
Planner designation. He
was the
recipient of
The
Network Journal's
40 Under
Forty
Achievement
Award
in
2000.1
Grace Lopiccolo
Profaci
is a global program man-
ager with
IBM
in Poughkeepsie.
She and
her husband,
Joe,
have
two children,Joseph and
Juliana.
I
Bonnie Blanchard
Unser is direc-
tor of children and family services
at Living
Resources
Corp. in
Schenectady, N.Y., serving
people
with developmental disabilities.
1 9 8 4
Christopher
Capone has been
ap-
pointed assistant
treasurer
of
in-
vestor
relations
for
both
Central
Hudson
Gas
&
Electric Corp. and
CH
Energy
Group,
Inc.
in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Peggy Ducey
is a
"domestic engineer"
responsible for
the care of her four school-aged
children.
Her husband,
Charles
Downey
'85,
isa
bond
broker
with
Garban
lntercapital
in
New York,
N.Y.
I
Timothy Keough
was
pro-
moted
to
vice president of training
operations
at
Assessment Solutions,
Inc.,
in April
2000.
I
Kathleen
Byrne Lloyd
and
her husband,
Chuck, and son, Charlie,
have
built
a
new home
in
Hauppauge,
N.Y.
She has started
her
own transcrip-
tion business.
I
Patrice Sarath
has
written several short stories
that
have
appeared
in
magazines
in-
cluding
Alf
red Hitchcock Mystery
Magazine
and in anthologies of sci-
ence
fiction
and fantasy. A major
publisher is interested in her novel.
I
Coleen
Hollywood
Sewing
is
a
principal with executive
recruiters
Herbert Mines Associates. Coleen
is
responsible for
business
devel-
opment and
placing
senior-level
executives in
the
retail and con-
sumer products industries.
I
David
J.
Welsh
has
been promoted
to
assistant
vice president
in
deposit
and accounting
operations at the
Bank of New York
in
New
York,
N.Y.
1
9 8 5
Charles
Downey
is a bond
broker
with Garban
lntercapital
in
New
York, N.Y., which enables
his
wife,
Peggy Ducey
'84, to
maintain
her
position as "domestic engineer"
responsible
for
the care of their
four school-aged children.
I
Ber-
nard
A. Feeney
III
is relationship
manager and
assistant
vice presi-
dent for the
Hudson
Valley district
of KeyBank.
I
Mark Giuffre
is
public relations
manager
for UPS
Airlines at
the
main
UPS air
hub
in
Louisville, Ky.
I
Carla Lowe
is a
top
producer at Coldwell
Banker
in Los Angeles, Calif. She and
her
husband,
Ray, have
purchased a
new home.
I
Eileen H. Mc:Cue
is
a
certified social worker
II
for Taconic
DDSO. Eileen
also
is
in
private
practice
as
a
mental
health
psycho-
therapist. During
the
summer of
1999, she
traveled
to
Japan.,
China,
Singapore
and Thailand.
I
Patrick
McCullough
won
the
Silver
Apple
award from
the National
Media
Network for
his
educational film
on teen dating violence, "Crossing
the
Line."
He
was a
finalist
in
the
1998
Sundance
Film Festival
screenwriting contest for
h:is
script,
"Broham."
I
Paul Nienst.adt
has
been promoted
to manager
in
glo-
bal
enterprises,
relationsh:ips,
glo-
bal
customer solutions and general
procurement at IBM.
I
Mlargaret
Adamski
Soltis
teaches
English at
Our Lady of
Lourdes High
School
in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Linda Zemba,
her husband, Frank
Burhance
'83,
and their son, Noah,
have returned
to the Northeast after many years
in Atlanta,
Ga. They
now
reside
in
Fairfield,
Conn., where Noah
is
taking
advantage
of
the
shore.
]P1nm•nc
::
1 9 8 6
Daniel Biglin
has been
prnmoted
to
corporate account
manager
at
GTE lnternetworking,
responsible
for
General Electric,
Time
line. and
AXA Financial.
In
this p•osition,
Dan
achieved
"100% Club" status
for 1999.
I
Kenneth Bri,ggs
has
accepted
a new
position
as
analyst/
technical
developer at
New York
Independent
System Operator
in
Guilderland, NY.
The
company is
responsible for running the New
York
State
power
grid
as
well
as the
marketplace on which generators
bid to provide
power
throughout
the
state.
Ken is
a Web developer
at
N.Y.l.S.O.
He
and his wife, Marla,
are the parents of Amy
Eliizabeth.
Ken's band, a
blues/funk quartet
called "Boot
the
Owl,"
performs
regularly in
the Albany, N.Y., area.
I
Theresa Clark-Switzer
Ls a full-
time working mother of three chil-
dren who
is
involved in all
their
activities. She is on
the board
of
the
Phoenix
Community
Nursery
School, where she has served as
vice-president for
the
past
two
years.
I
Christopher
Clements
was promoted
to
first vic,e presi-
dent
with Groupama Asset
Man-
agement
in
New
York,
N.Y., in
September
2000
I
Stephen
De
Vito
is single and rocking and
rolling
with his sax.
He
hop,estoact
in movies
and television shows.
I
James Ellis has
been promoted
to
manager of the vocational alterna-
tives program at Gateway Commu-
nity Industries
in Kingston,
N.Y.
I
Anthony
Giachinta
has
been
promoted to senior vice
president
at Structure-Tone.
He
and his wife,
Una Geoghegan,
live
in
Wood-
bridge,
Va., with
their
four chil-
dren.
I
Kim Goodson
is an air
transportation
specialist in
the
New
York Air National Guard
in
Scotia,
N.Y.,
holding
the
rank
of staff ser-
geant.
I
In
July 2000
Tim
McConville
and
his
wife,Jennifer,
again
sponsored an annual charity
golf outing in
memory
of
their
son,
Christopher, who
died
on Dec. 2,
1996,
from
Sudden
Infant
Death
Syndrome.
The
outing
raised more
than
$37,000
to benefit
the
CJ
Foundation
for
SIDS. Tim and
Jen-
nifer extend special
thanks to
the
alumni who participated
and
to
Jim Marriott
'86 for his support.
I
The Hon. Howard D. Mills III
was
reelected
to
a
second
term
in
the New
York
State Assembly on
Nov.
7,
2000.
He
represents the
95
th
District.
I
Michael O'Brien
has
been
promoted
to
senior vice
president/director of brand mar-
keting practice at
Ketchum
Public
Relations
in New York, N.Y.
I
Ian
O'Connor
has been voted one of
the top Lhree
sports columnists
in
America
in
newspapers
with
circu-
lations of
100,000 to
250,000 by
the Associated
Press Sports
Edi-
tors.
He also
has
been honored
by
the Professional
Basketball Writers
of America as one of
the top three
in
column writing. Ian writes sports
columns for the Gannett newspa-
per
chain.
I
Ken Roberts
is com-
munity
relations and development
specialist at Charlotte Hungerford
Hospital
in
Torrington, Conn.
I
Kim Stucko
is an administrative
assistant at
the
Ludwig Group,
Inc.
in New
York,
N.Y.
IJohn
H.
"Jack"
Wicks
has
accepted a principal
consultant
position
with The Capi-
tal Markets
Co., a
management
consulting firm in New York City.
Jack
specializes
in
financial ser-
vices
technology
consulting to large
banks,
investment banks,
broker-
dealers and
asset
management
firms.
Formerly
with
Price
Waterhouse
Coopers,
l.l.P., he is
a professor at
Hofstra
University
in
the
business computer
information
systems/quantitative
methods
de-
partment.
He
is also on the execu-
tive
editorial advisory board for
The
CPA Journal.
He is
married to
Marie Esperancilla Wicks
and has
a
daughter, Kathleen. He resides
in
Stewart Manor, N.Y.
NEW
ARRIVALS
Jeanmarie Magrino '85
and
Nelson
Arnold, a son, Jeffrey
Nelson,
Nov. 23,
2000
Christine
and
Danny Maniscalchi
'85,
a son, James
Michael,
Nov.3, 2000
Elaina Marino '85
and Roy
Tollevsen,
a daughter,
Daniella
Marie,
July 25,
1999
Linda-Sue
and
James
J. Murphy '85,
a son, Austin
James,
Nov.
7,
2000
Colleen M. O'Brien '85
and
Robert
Toms,
a son, Connor,
March
28, 2000
Susan
and
Mark Stringer '85,
twin
sons,
Michael
and Brian,
July 2, 2000
Denise
and
Mark Zangari '85,
a son,
Joseph
Anthony,
Oct.
10, 2000
Patricia Clark '86
and Thomas
Michels,
a daughter,
Paige
Elizabeth,
Oct. 26, 2000
Mary M. Clifford '86
and
Eamon
Mccooey,
a
daughter,
Amanda
Grace,
June
7, 2000
Laurie DesJardins
'86
and
Toufik
Ferhani,
a son, Ali
DesJardins,
Jan. 21, 2001
Casey Marra '86
and
Rich
Karel,
a son,
Nicholas
Grant,
Jan. 12, 2000
Sue
and
James
G. Norman '86,
a son,
Tyler
James,
Oct. 1, 2000
Maura
Carroll
and
John M. Walsh '86,
a son,
Brendan
William,
Nov. 5,
2000
Doris David '87
and Thomas
Conti,
a son,
John David,
April
25, 2000
Maureen Ferguson '87
and Thomas
Bridgman,
a
daughter,
Kathleen
Helen,
May 26,
2000
Terese Lantos '87
and Michael
DeGagne,
a son,
Thomas
Guy,
March
1,
2000
Linda
and
Michael McHale '87,
a
daughter,
Rachel,
May
26, 2000
Sheilagh O'Donoghue '87
and Bill
Manning,
a daughter,
Finn,
Dec.
10,
1999
S U M M E R 2 0 0 I
37





































Alumni
~
~.__/t!Y
NEW
ARRIVALS
Allison Telford '87
and
James J.
Fedigan '87,
a son,
Christopher
James,
Sept. 2,
1998
Patricia
Tuohy '87
and Robert
Birmingham,
a daughter,
Shannon
Maeve,
June
1,
2000
Barbara Byrn
'88
and Robert
Farina,
a
daughter,
Danielle
Margaret,
March
9,
2000
Kelly Colligan '88
and Michael
Coffey,
a daughter,
Sarah
Denise,
June
6, 2000
Elaine Ganci
'88
and
Michael
Bishop,
a
son,
Jack
Phillip,
Oct.
14, 2000
Mary Hegarty '88
and
John
Dodd,
a
daughter,
Julia,
March 15, 2000
Kim
Keller '88
and
Keith Sullivan
'87,
a
daughter,
Clare
Isabelle,
Nov.
21,
1999
Judith Mogavero
'88
and
David Joyce
'86,
a daughter,
Erin
Kathleen,
Nov.
6,
2000
Jennifer Scardino
'88
and
Paul
Dottinger '88,
a son, Benjamin
Paul,
April
7,
2000
Beth Ann Sewing '88
and Bill
Dexter,
a
daughter,
Sydney
Leigh,
Aug. 17, 1999
Stephanie Sowinski
'88
and
Robert Bondar
'88,
a
daughter,
Carly
Rose,
March
23,
2000
Mary Ann
and
Joseph Stevens
'88,
a
daughter,
Nicole
Elizabeth,
Sept.
18, 2000
Linda
and
Robert E. Davis
'89,
a son,
Nicholas
Robert,
July
11,
2000
Karen Gorman '89
and James
McGetrick,
a son, Gavin
Joseph,
July
25, 2000
Deborah Kuffner '89/95 M
and
Daniel Kuffner
'68,
a
grandson,
Alexander
Taylor
Chuckas,
Jan. 4,
1999
Judith Maitland '89
and John Reggio,
a
son,
John Louis
111,
Oct.
16,
1999
Melinda
and
James Mccloskey
'89,
a
son,
Brendan
Michael,
July 7, 2000
Patricia Walsh
'89
and Gregory
Fitzgerald
Andersen,
a son, Collin
Gregory,
Dec.
12, 1999
38
M A R I
ST
M AG AZ I
N E
1
9 8 7
Julie Clark Brown
is deputy
com-
missioner of
the
Su!Livan County
(N.Y.) Division of Planning and
Community
Development.
Julie
and her husband, Ken, adopted a
little girl
from
China in
1999 Her
name
isJianghi.1
Ray
Chelstowski
is
New York advertii;ing
manager
for
Time
lnc.'s
Entertainment
Weekly
magazine. He lives
in
Connecticut
with
his
wife, Catherime, and
their
son, Jack.
I
Nick Citera
will
be
opening a
restaurant,
Cosimo's
Brick Oven,
near
Marist College
soon.
I
Doris
David
Conti
is a
senior
software development man-
ager at IBM in Poughkeepsie.
I
Tim Curry
is director of catering
at
the Harvard
Club of Boston.
I
Kevin
Cushingjoined
ING
Barings
in
Boston
in December
1999 as
vice
president
of institutional sales.
I
Frederick
E. Dever,Jr.
has
been
promoted
to
managed
care account
manager
at
Johnson :and
Johnson.
Based
in
Washington, D.C., he cov-
ers the
East
Coast region.
I
Joelle
M. Charlot
Duffy
has been pro-
moted to
director
of studio pro-
duction for MTV Studios
in
Times
Square.
I
Matthew Durkin
has
joined
the firm
of Accountemps in
New York, N.Y., as :;taffing
man-
ager.
I
Linda Smith
Jager
is a
contributing
editor of
Colorado
Parent
magazine. She
also
appears
twice weekly on "WB2day" and
"WB2 News@l
l" as;
a
parenting
contributor. Both shows air on
Denver's WB2 KWEN. Previously
she was a parenting contributor on
KCNC
in
Denver.
I
Kevin]. Kaley
has
been promoted
t.o
implemen-
tation
engineer at MCI Worldcom,
where he has worked fortwo years.
He graduated
from
Marist's ROTC
program and holds the rank of
major in
the
U.S. Reserves.
I
Karen
Chatterton
Manion
is an execu-
tive
coach specializing
in leader-
ship and communications. When
not busy creating
"execu-divas,"
Karen
spends time with her
hus-
band and daughters.
I
Michael
O'Looney
is
a general assignment
reporter
for WCBS Television
in
New York, N.Y. His wife, Annika
Pergament, recently
joined
Mike at
CBS as the station's consumer
re-
porter.
I
Scot
Scala ii;
a fund-raiser
at SUNY Orange County Commu-
n_it
y College. He and
his
wife,
Tracy
Petajasoja
Scala, liv,~ in
Campbell
Hall, N.Y. with their son, Ryan.
I
Todd Wysocki
has
heen
promoted
to
department chair/assistant pro-
fessor of liberal arts,
individual
studies and
learning
skills at
Hudson Valley Community Col-
lege
in Troy,
N.Y.
1
9 8 8
Sean
Armstrong has been
pro-
moted
to
vice president and
branch
manager of Charles Schwab
in
Walnut Creek, Calif.
I
CW3
Michael
Carson
has
returned
from
a 10-month tour at Camp
Doha
in
Kuwait, where he was promoted to
chief warrant officer 3 and is at-
tending
the
Warrant Officer Ad-
vanced Course
at
Fort
Rucker,
Ala.
Michael is a UH-60
Blackhawk
helicopter
maintenance
officer and
maintenance
test
pilot
with
the
U.S.
Army's 498
th
Medical
Company out
of Fort Benning, Ga.
I
Kathleen
Dawson
began
a
part-time work
schedule to spend
more time rais-
ing
her
children, Brian and Laura
I
The
Columbus
(Ohio)
Dispatch
highlighted
Adam
Ferrara's
career as a stand-up comic
in its
"On
Comedy" column last year.
Adam was headlining at a club in
Columbus.
I
Rick
Hankey
has been
promoted
to
executive producer,
music
video
programming
for VH 1.
Rick
now
supervises all
music
video
programming
for VH 1, creating and
developing
new music video-based
programs.
I
Timothy S.
Lee
has
been
promoted to director of fi-
nancial services for K-B
Toys
in
Pittsfield, Mass.
Tim is
responsible
for store reporting and expense
control, cash management, sales
audit and payroll.
I
Diane
Mabey
has
returned
to
the
United States
after living in England for eight
months,
primarily
traveling and
writing.
I
Edward
Maffai
teaches
physical education and
health in
a
Brooklyn
intermediate
school.
I
Nicholas
Mancuso
is a physical
education
teacher
for grades K-5 at
the
King
Street School in Port
Chester,
N.Y.
I
Thomas
F.
McGrath
served as a pilot in the
U.S. Navy
from
1989101998. Hired
by Delta
Air
Lines
in 1998, he
flies
the Boeing
727 out of Cincinnati.
Married
in 1992, he
and his wife,
Michelle, have two children, Tho-
mas
J.
and Emily Anne.
I
Cathy
Cuccia Northen,
her husband,
Chris, and their
daughters,
Sarah
and
Holly, live
outside Atlanta, Ga.
Cathy and Chris adopted
Holly
Marie Hoa from Vietnam
in
May
1999
as an
infant.
Cathy is
director
of marketing for Young Audiences
of Atlanta, the
nation's
largest
non-profit educational arts organi-
zation, providing more
than
1.5
million Georgia students with qual-
ity
arts programming.
I
James
Roldan
is
an
ENG operator/editor
forthe
PBS program
"Nightly Busi-
ness
Report." NBR is the most
watched
business news
program
in
the world, reaching
280 PBS
stations worldwide.
James
also
works as a
free-lance
camera op-
erator for the Madison Square Gar-
den Network, covering New York
Yankees and New York
Rangers
games.
I
Nancy
Roof
is
director
of
A&R administration
at Jive
Records,
working with
Britney
Spears, the Backstreet Boys and
NSync.
I
Thomas
Ruede
accepted
a
new
position as
director
of
logis-
tics at the Behmann Group in Pom-
pano Beach,
Fla.
He
and
his
wife,
Nora
Bomba Ruede,
and theirtwo
children,
Jane
and Tommy, have
relocated
to
Coral Springs.
I
Tony
Santiago
is
a
master control op-
erator at Lifetime Television.
I
Robert
Watson
has been named
superintendent of schools for
the
Poughkeepsie City School
District.
Last fall he
received
the
Marist
College
President's
Award for ex-
ceptional community service in the
Mid-Hudson Valley.
(Please
see the
article on Page 4 for more about
Robert.)
I
Ors.
Brian
and
Mary
Wicenski
and their son, Evan, are
enjoying
life in
New London, N.H.
1 9 8 9
Alan
A ffuso
isan
information
tech-
nology recruiter for Multifact/
Hobart
IT
in Pleasantville, N.Y.
Alan
invites
alumni
to
call him at
(845) 741-2490 for assistance
in
finding a technical
position.
I
Mary
Beth Bambridge
is
director of
fi-
nance
for Walt
Disney
Pictures and
Television in
Burbank,
Calif.
I
Eve
Carlin is
department chair of the
Paralegal Studies department at
Columbia
Junior
College in Co-
lumbia,
S.C. She and her
husband,
Dave
L'Heureux,
will celebrate
their
10
th
wedding anniversary in
July
2001.
I
Susan
Ryan
Gallo
was awarded a master's in educa-
tion
from
the
College of New
Roch-
elle in May 2000. Susan and
her
husband, Tom, are the
parents
of a
daughter,
Samantha, who cel-
ebrated
her second birthday
inJuly
2000.
I
Julia
Hathaway
left
TIAA-
CREF's Investment
Law Depart-
ment after five years
and has moved
to Boston to be with her fiance.
I
Michael Kennedy
has
been
pro-
moted to divisional
administrative
manager of Entertainment Publi-
cations
in
Albany, N.Y. Michael
oversees staffs
in
New
York,
New
Jersey,
Montreal
and
Detroit,
Mich.
In 1999
he
was
named regional
and national administrator of the
year.
I
Carol-Ann Catucci
Kinane
was recognized as the Year
2000



































Jeffrey Nick '77
Is Named an IBM
Fellow, IBM's Top
Technical Honor
tomation and virtual server hosting.
Jeffrey
M.
Nick '77, an
IBM
Distinguished
Engineerworking
in Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.,
has
been
named
one of seven
new IBM
Fellows.
Previously
Jeff was
lead
architect
for
the
S/390
platform and also served as
the technical leader
of
the
5/390
eBusiness
Customer Council.
Jeff
is
widely
recognized
as
the leading
techni-
cal expert
on 5/390 Parallel
Sysplex.
He
received
an
IBM
Corporate
Award for
his
contributions
to the design and de-
velopment
of the
Parallel
Sysplex
Cou-
pling Facility and Parallel
Sysplex
data-
sharing
architecture.
More
recently,
Jeff
defined the technical
strategy
for Linux
on the
S/390
platform and
led
the de-
sign initiative
for
LPAR
Clusters
Intelli-
gent Resource
Director
on IBM's zSeries
high-end
computer
systems.
Jeffrey
M.
Nick '77
The
distinction,
the company's
most
prestigious
technical
honor,
goes to
IBM's
top
scientists,
researchers
and
developers.
Since
the
IBM
Fellows
pro-
gram began
in
1963,
only
165
individu-
als
have
been
so
honored;
53 are active
employees.
Included
among
the
IBM
Fellows
are five
Nobel
Laureates
and
four members
of the
National
Inventors
Hall of Fame.
Jeff
is chief
architect
for software
technology
strat-
egy across
IBM's eServer
family of
computer
systems.
He
is the technical
chairperson
for both the IBM cus-
tomer Advanced
e-Business
Council and internal IBM
e5erver
Design Council,
comprised
of
leading e-busi-
ness
customers
and
IBM
designers.
The
mission
of the
councils
is to create e-business
integrated infrastruc-
ture solutions across
IBM
servers
and middleware.
In
this capacity, Jeff is driving technical initiatives in
several strategic areas such as distributed workload
management,
clustering
technology,
cross-platform
au-
Jeff
joined
IBM
in 1980
as a devel-
oper in
the
S/390 MVS
operating system.
During
his
care,er
at
IBM he
has held
positions
in
MVS
system
desiqn and development
and as a
large
systems
tech-
nicall specialist
focused
on continuous
availability is-
sues.
Distinguished Special
Education
Teacher Award recipient in the
Huntington Union Free School
District for her work both in the
classroom and
the
community.
I
Michael Kinane
was named direc-
tor
of public and
media
relations at
the
State University of New York
College at Old Westbury (N.Y.)
Mike
is
responsible for
implement-
ing
public relations
initiatives
to
enhance
the
college's profile and
image,
overseeing the development
of internal and external pub
I ica-
tions
and coordinating advertising
strategies and campaigns.
I
Jill
Seidman
Martin
is
the western
regional
advertising manager for
Editor & Publisher magazine. She
and
her
husband,
Stephen Martin
'98, live
in
Carmel, Calif.
I
Sarah
N.
Post
recently auained IBM and
Project
Management
Institute
project management certification.
She is a senior project
manager
for
IBM in White Plains, N.Y.
I
Susanne
Lynn Wilson
is the vice
president of North American sales
for Ventilo, a Paris-based clothing
company. From 1990
to
2000 she
was an account executive with
Calvin Klein. She and her hus-
band, Aubrey,
live in
Lindenhurst,
N.Y., with
their
children, Zachary
and twins Sofie and Lyndsey.
1 9 9 0
Christopher
Bricker
has relocated
to Europe to take over responsibil-
J,eff has also been the
recipient
of several IBM
Outstanding
Innovation
Awards
and
is
a prolific
inven-
tor,
with
more
than
70
filed
inventions
and dozens
of
U.S. patents in
computer
systems
technology.
He
is
a
member
of the IBM Academy
of Technology.
Hie and his wife,
Madeline, reside
in
West
Park,
N.Y., with
their
family.
it y for international ope rations as
managing
director
for Alliance
Capital Management.
I
William
Defilippo
has
earned a master of
ans
in
counseling,
human
services
and guidance from Montclair State
University
in
New Jersey, graduat-
ing with a 3. 7 average.
II
Jennifer
M.
Schiffer
Freeh
enjoys being a
stay-at-home mom
to Danielle,
3
1/2, and Nicholas, 20 months. Her
husband,
Vince, is a prnfessor of
computer science at
the
University
of
Notre
Dame.
I
Desmond
Gallahue
is vice
presideint
of sales
at Qmedia, a broadcast transmis-
sion company in New York, NY.
I
Sean Hawkins
has opened Steel
Pagoda Information Syst,~ms,
Inc.,
a Web development company.
I
Donna Jeannette
has been ap-
pointed director of marketing for
24/7 Media,
Inc.
in New York City.
I
Sandy
Ludlum
has been pro-
moted to
vice president of opera-
tions
at Hudson Valley Federal
Credit Union
in
Poughkeepsie. She
has been with HVFCU for 17 years.
I
Gary C.
Vincent
is
the technical
coordinator for World
Travel
Part-
ners in Alpharetta, Ga. Hie lives in
Dawsonville, Ga., with his wife,
Dawn, and son, Frankie.
lPamn•,a:=
1 9 9 1
Daniel
j.
Bowman
is
a
firefighter
with the NYC Fire Department,
assigned
to Ladder 108 in
Williamsburg, Brooklrn. Dan is
also a pan-time teacher for the
NYC Board of Education.
In
No-
vember 2000,
he
ran
in his
first
New York City marathon,
repre-
senting the Fire Department team.
He successfully completed the 26.2
mile jaunt through the five bor-
oughs
in
3:50:45. The Fire Depart-
ment
team defeated
the
NYPD
team
in their
annual head-to-head battle
over the City Cup. Dan lives in
Staten Island, N.Y.
I
Kym Eggers
is a quality control auditor at Phar-
maceutical Product Development,
Inc., where she has worked for
more than six rears. Kym has lived
in
Wilmington, N.C., for seven
years and
recently
bought a home.
I
Joseph
L.
Faraldi
is president
and chief designer of Website
21.com,
Inc.,
a Web development
and marketing firm
that
specializes
in animation, Web design, CD
media and application services. The
Web
site
address
is
www.websile2l.com.
I
Linda
Gei-
ger
has worked in
the
Minisink
Valley Central School District for
two
years as an ESL teacher and the
district's ESL program coordina-
tor.
I
Senan Gorman
is a free-
lance
graphic artist and illustrator
in Farmington, Conn. The name of
Senan's company
is
North Pole
Design.
I
Deirdre Higgins
was
awarded an M.S. in elementary
education from Dowling College
NEW
ARRIVALS
Kathryn
Begin
'90
and Tim Curreen,
twin sons,
Daniel
and Christopher,
May
25, 2000
Michelle
Blanck
'90
and
Thomas
Flavin
'89,
a daughter,
Kasey
Michelle,
May
12, 2000
Ann Marie Caputo
'90
and Steven
Rung,
a daughter,
Maya
Grace,
May
5, 2000
Patricia
DePaolo
'90
and Sean
Munk,
a daughter,
Alison Noelle,
June
18, 2000
Patricia Flynn '90
and Joseph
Skahill,
a son, John
Joseph,
March
30, 2000
Keana
Hourigan
'90
and
Kenneth
Anna '90,
a son, Taigue
Frederick,
May
23, 2000
Helen Lawler '90
and
Michael
Seebold '90,
a
son, Kevin
Patrick,
Feb.
3, 1999
Dawn and
Carl
Marinaccio
'90,
a
daughter,
Carlyn
Alexa,
May
1. 2000
Regina
Moeller
'90
and
Kenneth
Kempster
'89,
a son, Derrick,
June
26, 2000
Irene
and
Glenn Onos
'90,
a daughter,
Jennifer,
Sept.
7, 2000
Anne and
Jon
Petrucci
'90,
a son,
William
Galvin,
July
21, 2000
Jennifer Saner
'90
and David
Mirabella,
a daughter,
Katherine
Elizabeth,
April
9,
2000
Maryann
and
Steven Shulkin
'90,
a
daughter,
Savanah
Hailey,
Jan. 1,
2000
Kathleen Steidle
'90
and Chris
Soulias,
a daughter,
Kayla
Ann.
Aug.
12,
1999
Molly Ward
'90
and
Kieran Fagan
'90,
a daughter,
Claire
Carey,
March
15, 2000
Christine Bailey
'91
and James
DeRegis,
a son, Ethan
James,
Dec. 11,
2000
Patricia Boland
'91
and Peter
Meyers,
a son, Colin, Sept.
10, 1999
SU
\1 \1 E
R 2 0 0
I
39
























Alumni
NEW
ARRIVALS
Sheila Clancy '91
and Martin
O'Donnell,
a son, Seamus
Edward,
Aug.
16,
2000
Denise DeCicco '91
and
David
Kasper,
a daughter,
Carolyn
Rose,
Jan. 20,
2000
Denise Farren '91
and David
Calloway,
a son,
David
Henry,
April 2 2, 2000
Deserie Gaffney
'91
and
Donald
Burns,
a daughter,
Shannon
Elizabeth,
April
6,
2000
Leicia
and
John Gahan
'91,
a son,
John
Louis,
Oct.
9,
2000
Linda Gallagher
'91
and Michael
Reusch,
a son, Jack
Michael,
Oct.
1,
2000
Deborah
and
Christopher
T. Gleeson
'91,
a son,
Thomas,
Aug. 26,
1999
Jane
and
Ritchie Gomez
'91,
a son,
Jonathan
David,
Sept. 27, 2000
Patricia Handy '91
and Michael
Cannizzaro,
a daughter,
Olivia Margaret,
July 23,
1999
Kristin Hull '91
and
Robert Straub
'91,
a son, Nicholas
Robert,
Aug. 5,
2000
Jeanie
and
Desmond
Kenneally
'91,
a
daughter,
Ashley
Anna, Oct. 12,
2000
Stacey Larkins
'91
and
John
Mcvaigh,
a
son,
Matthew
Shaughn,
March
26,
1998,
and a daughter,
Meghan
Victoria,
July 25, 2000
Nikki and
Jason Lerner '91,
a son,
Ryan,
Feb. 19, 1999
Tara Mclaughlin
'91
and Peter
McGuinness,
a
daughter,
Patricia
Ann,
Sept.
9,
1999
Mary Nowak
'91
and
Michael Lynch
'91,
a
daughter,
Mikayla
Marie,
July
27, 2000
Deirdre E. O'Dea '91
and Stephen
Corcoran,
a
daughter,
Alannah
Mary,
Feb.
23,
2000
Vida and
Dominic Odescalchi
'911
'93M,
a son, Alexander,
April 25,
2000
40
'vt
A R I S T M A G A Z
I
N E
in May 2000. She
is
employed
as
a
teacher
at Remsenburg-Speonk
El-
ementary School on
Long
Island.
I
Mark
lnnaimo
has
become a
part-
ner at Van
Der
Moolen Specialists
USA
in
New York City,
traders
on
the
floor of the New York Stock
Exchange. Mark and
his
wife,
Su-
san
Nick
Innaimo
'91,
are the
parents of
three
childlren.
I
James
J.
Jozefowicz received
a Ph.D.
in
economics
from
SUNY Albany in
1999 and
is
assistant.
professor of
economics
at
Indiana University of
Pennsylvania (IUP)
in Indiana,
Pa.
Jim
is
the
director
of the Summer
Honors
Program in
Economics
and
co-director of the
IUP
Center for
Economic
Education.
I
Desmond
Kenneally
was
promoted
to assis-
tant vice
president in
charge of
regulatory reporting
at
the interna-
tional
banking firm
Arnhold and S.
Bleichroeder,
Inc.
in
NlewYork City.
I
Ruth Halley
Mahoney
is a vice
president in
the
global services
di-
vision of Fleet Bank's
private bank-
ing
group.
I
Courtney Messina
has
been pursuing certification
in
early childhood
education
at
Montclair State University
in
Montclair, N.j. Courtney expected
to
complete
the
certification
in
May
2001.
I
Valentina
!Kemp-Miller
received a master's
in
social work
from Fordham University
in
May
2000 and works as a substance
abuse therapist for Pius XII
in
Newburgh, N.Y.
I
Richard Park
joined Intel
Corp. at i1ts
new
Fab
23
in
Colorado Springs, Colo.,
as a
software engineer
in
the
automa-
tion
department.
I
Stanley G.
Phelps,
Esq.
works
for
Adidas
In-
ternational
in
Amsterdam,
Holland.
I
Jo-Anne Prokopowicz
is god-
mother to
Alex Chri1stopher Fay,
infant
son of
Kristirn Owens Fay
'91,Jo-Anne's roomnnate
at
Marist
for
four
years. During
the
summer
of 2000,
Jo-Anne
wa:s
an
alternate
delegate to
the Republican
National
Convention
in Philadelphia,
Pa.,
representing Virginia. She is direc-
tor
of media
relations
and special
events for PowerUp, an organiza-
tion
founded
by
Steve Case of AOL
and Gen. Colin
Powell
to
bridge
the digital
divide f.or America's
young
people.
Jo-Anne also serves
as president of
the
Washington/
Baltimore
Chapter of
the
Marist
College Alumni Association.
I
Allison
Carnpilii
Sapp
works at
United
Parcel
Service
in
the
busi-
ness development
department.
She
traveled to
Australia
from
Sept. 30
to
Oct. 14, 2000,
for the 2000
Summer Olympic Games to assist
UPS
in
hosting a customer event. A
week
later
she married Jay Sapp at
Marist.
I
David
Sievers finished
an M. F.A. in screenwritingat Loyola
Marymount University in
Los
An-
geles
in
1999.
He
works as a writer
at an Internet start-up, Loren
Data
Corp.
I
Jeffrey Thibeault
now
covers Colorado for
MaviJirn
Sun-
glass,
a Polarized
sunglass lens corn
-
pany
based
in
Lahaina, Hawaii.
I
Christopher
Trieste
teaches
physical education
and
coaches the
girls' tennis team
at
Ossining High
School
in
Ossining, N.Y. One of his
students,Jenna
Loeb,
won the 2000
New York State Girls' Singles
Tennis Championship. He
is
the
publisher of
www.tennisedge.net,
a
tennis e-zine. Chris's book,
Lefty Tennis,
is available
at
www.mightywords.com.
His wife,
Christine Baker Trieste
'93, is
busy educating and caring for their
three children.
1 9 9 2
Carmine
Allonardo,
D.C.
has
opened a practice, Posture Perfect
Chiropractic in West Orange, NJ
I
Annette
Astorino
graduated
from
Long
Island
University
in
January
1999 with an M
.S.
in elementary
education.
I
Chris Bautista
is Web
designer
for Maher
&
Maher, an
organizational
development
firm
in
Little
Silver, NJ Chris is also
junior
varsity boys' basketball coach
for
St.
Rose High
School
in
Belmar,
NJ
I
Elena Kodis Bergin
was
awarded an M.Ed. in elementary
education
from Lesley
College in
August
1999.
I
Hilary
Simon
Britton
has been
a
real
estate agent
in
Kirkland,
Wash, since
1998.
She expected to
have
her
broker's
license
by
Feb. 2001 and be an
associate broker with Coldwell
Banker
Bain.
I
Francesca
Burns
received a master's
in instruction
and curriculum in May 2000 from
Kean
University in Union, N.j. She
teaches
geography at Bloomfield
(NJ) Middle School.
I
Christine
Carbone
has
been promoted to
l/f
senior specialist at
IBM
in East
Fishkill, N.Y.
I
Jon
Cerabone has
been
promoted to product
man-
ager of GameDealer.com, the larg-
est online-only retailer of video
games and a member of UGO Net-
works.
I
Matthew P. Corcoran
is
a
local
broadcast supervisor at
Lowe,
Lintas
&
Partners, a New
York
City advertising agency.
I
Nancy
Halpin
teaches
fourth grade
at P.S. No. 37 Cordero School in
Jersey
City,
N.J.
I
Martin
Hochhauser
is a quality assurance
consultant at Test Force Corp. in
New
York,
N.Y. Marty helps im-
prove the
quality of Web sites for
various
dot-corns. He
says he owes
a debt of gratitude
to
Marist and
Jerry
McBride's MSCS graduate
pro-
gram for an excellent education.
I
Fred
Koslowski
Ill
was recruited
by
and accepted a position with
Computer Sciences Corp., a $9.4
billion
management/technology
consulting
firm.
As a project man-
ager in
the technology
manage-
ment group, Fred
is
responsible
for
major industry and government
in-
formation systems consulting and
program
management
including
strategic
development,
integration
and implementation. Previously
he
served as an
IT
project
manager in
the
PASS software division of
Tickets.com.
Fred is also nearing
completion of an M.B.A. from
LeMoyne College
in
Syracuse, N.Y.
I
Kelly
Lagan
recently published
research
in
perceptual and motor
skills. Kelly
is
a school psycholo-
gist with the
Duplin
County Public
Schools in Kenans\'ille, N.C.
I
Margaret
A.
Troy McCluskey
is
a
marketing
manager at Pyramid
Accessories in New York City.
I
Manuel Mercader
is managing at-
torney
in the New York office of
Heller Ehrman White
&
McAuliffe
L.L.P.
I
Jason Millard
has been
promoted
to director of the
invest-
ment-banking arm of Rabobank
International. He is working on
implementing a
new
treasury
man-
agement application.
Jason
has
been living in London for almost
six years.
I
Claire
Hathaway Miller
has been married
to
Sean for al-
most seven years. They are
the par-
ents of Hunter and Jacqueline. She
is employed
in
the Hyde Park Cen-
tral School District as a student
assistance
counselor.
I
Paul
Molinari
has
been promoted to
manager of e-business partnerships
at CenterWatch,
a division of
Thomson
Publishing
in
Boston.
I
Frank M. Mora, Esq.
is an attor-
ney/managing
partner
in
the
law
office of Brooke,
Mora and
Gemmati, L.L.P. The firm
has
opened new offices at 30 Manches-
ter
Road in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Michael O'Farrell
has been named
communications manager for ETP,
Inc., a
nonprofit
management
consulting
firm
in
East Hanford,
Conn.
I
Lisa Karpinsky O'Leary
is
a middle school counselor in
Red
Hook,
N.Y.
I
Michael Prout
was
promoted
in
May 2000
to
chief
inspector
with the United States
Marshals Service
in
Washington,
D.C.1
Gerril
Roelof
was promoted
toshiftsupervisorat the
Willamette
Valley 911 Center in Salem, Ore.,
in October 2000.
I
The Toledo,

























Former Annual Fund Directors Get Mab~hing
Gifts
Believe
It
Or Not: (Left to right) Joan Gambeski '83,
Jennifer
Dubuque '87 and
Robin
Torres
'95
M.A.
all once held the same job at Marist. Now they each have twins, a boy and a girl.
Maybe it was
something in the
water
in the
Advance-
ment Office.
Perhaps
it was the alignment of
the
planets all
those
nights of overseeing phonathons.
Could it have been
the
office
chair?
from
1986
to
1988.
She
and her husband,
George
'77,
had twins Catherine Marie and Mark Francis on April
19,
2000.
All we
know
for
sure
is
that three
of Marist's annual
fund directors went on to
have twins-and
each had a
boy and a girl. All
three
of
the mothers
are also Marist
graduates.
The first
to be
blessed was Robin
Torres
'95
M.A.
Robin
served as annual fund
director
from September
1992
to October
1995.
Robin and her
husband,
Wil, had
twins Lauren
Diller
and
Ethan
James on Jan.
22, 1999.
Next was Jennifer Dubuque '87, who
succeeded Robin
as annual fund director. Jennifer and her
husband, Dan,
had
twins
Connor
Daniel
and Megan Victoria on June
30,
1999.
Joan Gambeski
'83
was annual
fund
director
Each
mom has continued her career while
raising
the familly.
Robin
is
now director of Marist's Center for
Advising
and Academic Services and an adjunct
lec-
turer in psychology
at
Marist.
Jennifer is assistant
director of
individual
gifts and gift planning at
Renssela1er
Polytechnic Institute
in
Troy, N.Y. Joan
is
vice pres.ident
for development at Saint Francis
Hospi-
tal
in Poughkeepsie.
Ohio, Clerk of Court has hired
R.
Allen
Roy
as the executive assis-
tant to
the
Clerk. Allen handles
media
relations for
this elected of-
ficial. He also manages human re-
sources for
the
Clerk's office.
I
Michael Stec
has been named di-
rector of annual giving at SUNY
Cortland. Michael reports to the
College Foundation executive di'-
rector in the Office of Institutional
Advancement and supervises the
Call Center manager. He is a New
York State cenified emergency
medical technician (EMT) and
ser\'es with the Cortlandville Fire
Department.
An Eagle Scout, he is
an assistant leader with the 8.S.A.
-
As for the
current
annual
fund
director, Marilyn
Brandl '94,
the only twins
in
her
future
might
be
grandchildren. She welcomes her first grandchild this
summer and
her
second
this
winter.
sponsored Venture Crew at the
Lime Hollow Nature Center.
Michael is also a member of the
150
th
NYS
Volunteer
lnfantry
Regi-
ment,
a Civil War living
history
unit.
I
Kevin
Weigand
teaches
and coaches at
Ridgefield
Memo-
rial High
School
in
Ridgefield, NJ
I
Joy
Williams is
a corporate writer
in thecommunicationsdep:artment
of Girl Scouts of the U.5.A.,
in
charge of writing
key
leadership
speeches and messages.
1
9 9 3
Carla
Angelini Bautista
is direc-
tor of marketing for St.
Rose
High
School in Belmar, N.j. She and her
husband, Chris
Bautista
'92,
have
a two-year-old son, CJ
I
Daniel
Becker
is
a technical recruiter for
Sybase in Concord, Mass.
I
Ivelisse
Bryan
is a school psychologist for
the Duval County
Public
School
District in Jackson\'ille, Fla.
I
An-
drew M. Cohen
is a defensive co-
ordinator for the
football team
at
SUNY Stony Brook.
I
Jennifer
Smith Defelice
owns a dance stu-
dio,
Broadway
Bound,
in
Merrimack, N.H. She
teaches
tap,
jazz, ballet and acting.
Jennifer
li\'eS
in Nashua, N.H., with her hus-
band,
Michael Defelice
'94, and
their three
children.
I
Kraig
DeMatteis
was promoted to Web
NEW
ARRIVALS
Kristin
Owens
'91
and James
Fay,
a
son, Alex Christopher,
Sept.
26, 2000
Anne and
Michael
T.
Russin
'91,
a
son, Jonathon
Andrew,
June
29, 2000
Barbara Schatzle
'91
and Michael
McGrail,
a daughter,
Morgan
Elizabeth,
May
7, 2000
Sandra
and
James J. Tremblay '91,
a
daughter,
Kayla
Marie, Oct.
10, 2000
Brenda
Wagner
'91
and
Patrick
Coyne '91,
a daughter,
McKenzie,
Jan.
19,
2001
Jill Troseth
'91
and
Christopher
DeRobertis '91,
a son, Michael
Vincent,
Nov.
18, 2000
Susan Adams
'92
and
Robert
Broders '93,
a daughter,
Maggie
Rose,
Dec.
12,
1999
Trish Camperlengo
'92
and
Robert
Meindl
'92,
a son, Robert
A.,
Jr.,
June
26, 2000
Joan
and
John Chrysler
'92,
a
daughter,
Caroline,
Jan.
21,
2000
Eileen Doran
'92
and Daniel
Kline,
a
daughter,
Allison
Christina,
March
14, 2000
Maureen
Doran
'92
and
Christopher
Santarelli
'94,
a daughter,
Lauren
Mary, March
10, 2000
Jeanne Earle
'92
and Christopher
Strahley,
a son,
Ian
Joseph,
Jan.
1,
2000
Stacey
Horner
'92
and
Sean
Hawkins
'90,
a son, Chase
Alexander,
April
18, 2000
Lori Iversen
'92
and
Kip
Ferguson
'93,
a son,
Kyle
Scott, May
17, 2000
Cindy Jones
'92
and Robert
Hazelton,
a son, Robert
Joseph,
Jr.,
March
15,
2000
Elena
Kodis
'92
and Christopher
Bergin,
a son, Jack
Christopher,
Sept.
24, 2000
Carol
and
Matthew Murphy '92,
a son, John Phillip,
Feb.
20, 2000
SUMMER
2 0 0 I
41































Alumni
NEW
ARRIVALS
Tricia Rizzuto '92
and Anthony
Perrotti,
a
daughter,
Mia
Pasqualina,
Sept.
15, 2000
Tara Robertson
'92
and
Matthew
Notine '92,
a son, Matthew
Thomas,
May
23,
2000
Krissy
Andreasen '93
and
Tom
Shashaty,
a
son, John
Patrick
(aka
Jack),
Aug.
9, 1999
Christine Baker '93
and
Christopher
Trieste '91,
twins, Ryan
Christopher
and
Emily
Virginia,
Sept.
24, 2000
Jennifer
and
Greg Caires
'93,
a son,
Griffyn Michael,
March
26,
2000
Laura Carre
'93
and Bruce
Terry,
a son,
Benjamin
Michael,
June
7,
2000
Lynn
Dammers '93
and Christopher
Lupo,
a son,
Ryan
Christopher,
April
16, 2000
Kim Delaney
'93
and
Casey
McKee,
a
son,
Casey
Daniel,
Aug.
3, 2000
Lisa D. Dudek '93
and Greg
Bold,
a
son,
John
James,
Oct.
23, 2000
Darlene Eberhardt '93
and Benton
Duffett 111,
a son, Benton
IV,
Nov. 30,
1999
Noemi Fernandez, Esq.
'93,
a
granddaughter,
Sabrina
Loren
Tabbian,
Dec.
21,
1999
Traci
and
Brian Goldsborough
'93,
a
daughter,
Kayla
Jean,
Dec.
10, 1999
Ivelisse Gonzalez '93
and Christopher
Bryan,
a
son, Robert
Alexander,
Feb.
12, 2001
Nancy Horan
'93
and
Mario Sinatra,
Jr.,
a son,
Mario Joseph,
March
12,
2000
Karen
and
John McAuliffe
'93,
a
daughter,
Kaitlyn
Mae, Dec.
28, 2000
Jennifer O'Donovan
'93
and
Keith
McDonnell,
a daughter,
Claire
Jane,
Oct.
25,
2000
Jean Petroski '93
and Ben Ford,
a
daughter,
Caroline
Jean,
Oct.
6, 2000
Margot Power '93
and
Allen Tobin
'93,
a son, A.J., June
18, 2000
42
MA R
I
5 T \I A GAZ
I
N E
manager of St.
Joseph's
College in
New
York.
St. Joseph's
has
cam-
puses in Brooklyn
and Patchogue.
I
Karen Hoeger
DuB,ois
"retired"
from Central Hudson to stay home
and raise
her two
children,
Bo,
6,
and Kayla, 3.
Karen
i$
a part-time
candle consultant and full-time
mom.
I
John
A. Favai:zo
is attend-
ing
Old
Dominion
University
full-time, pursuing
a.
master's
in
education counseling.
I
Noemi
Fernandez
has
been admitted to
the
U.S Supreme Court Bar.
I
Michele
Francisco
is a
vice presi-
dent/associate media director for
advertising
at
Foote,
Cone
&
Belding Worldwide
in
New
York
City.
I
Cristin A. Gilleran '93
received
an
M.S.W. from Fordham
University
in May
1995. She is a
senior social worker for
the
early
childhood
developm.ent program
at
Schneider Children's Hospital
in
New
Hyde
Park, N.Y.
I
Kennard
Gopaul
is employed by the
City
of
New York
in its
Human Resources
Administration Management Infor-
mation
Systems Division.
He is
working
on several
mayoral
projects
that
deal
with welfare re-
form.
I
Kristin Onderdonk
Horan
has
returned
to
Ireland
after spend-
ing
a
year teaching English
in
the
Czech
Republic.
She isa marketing
executive for a
publishing
services
company in Shannon.
I
Deborah
Jack
has
completed an M.F.A.
at
SUNY-Buffalo.
I
Jacqueline
Kingsbury
has
"retired"
from work-
ing
for
Battered
Women's Services
but
plans
to continue to work part-
time for the YWCA supervised visi-
tation
program
through Dutchess
County Family Court.
I
Kathy
Kline
is a medical
technologist
for
Radisson Clinical
Laboratory
in
Baldwinsville, N.Y.
I
Virginia V.
Kosuda
returned
to
graduate
school
part-time
and is working at
the House
of
the
Good Shepherd in
Utica, N.Y.,
as
a case manager
in
therapeutic
foster care.
I
Maria
Giovanna
Licari
is
an associate
producer
at
"Good
Morning,
America."
Her
assignments
have
included off-air
reporting
at the
Academy Awards and work on
VHl's
"Divas"
and "Men Strike
Back"
as well as working with fa.
mous chefs
Emeril
Lagasse,
Wolfgang
Puck
and Sara Moulton.
I
Jay Linder
has been
promoted to
assistant director
of major gifls
for
Columbia Law School
in
New York
City.Jay has been with the
univer-
sity since
1996.
I
Eileen McCrory
graduated
from C.W. Post in
Brookville,
N.Y.,
with a master's
in
elementary education in
January
2001.
I
Denis McNicholl
was
promoted
to vice president of
emerging
markets
at Physicians
Formulary International, a drug
wholesaler
in
Phoenix, Ariz.
I
Tom
Mulryan
has been
promoted to
senior
account
manager-retention
from senior sales representative-
acquisition at Sprint Business in
San Francisco, Calif. He
is
respon•
sible for managing
major
accounts
for Sprint services.
I
Dr. Tanya
M.
Neuhaus is
a
practicing Doctor
of
Chiropractic
in southwestern
Florida.
Tanya lives
in
Bonita
Springs, Fla., with
her
husband,
Dr.
David Wittig.
lJoseph
R.
Proto
is a senior
financial
analyst at Com-
puter Science Corp. He also com-
pleted all classroom requirements
from
Albertus Magnus College.
I
Christine L.
Rowan
received
a
master's
in
TESOL at
Florida Inter-
national
University. She teaches
sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade
second
language learners
and owns
the Emerald
Pub
in
Hollywood,
Fla.
I
Thomas
R.
Samson,
Jr.
graduated
from
SUNY Stony Brook
University with an M.S.W. in May
2000. He is a bilingual caseworker
for Child Protective Services of Suf-
folk
County on
Long Island,
N
.Y.
I
Teresa Sorrentino
has
been
pro-
moted
to producer of
the
"Queen
Latifah Show" in New York,
N.Y.
I
1
st
Lt. Pamela Ann
Clinton '94
was deployed this
past
fall
with the 503
rd
MP BN
(ABN) in
Kosovo.
Even though
her unit's
mission was
security,
her
battalion on
its
own sponsored several schools
and villages
to
fill!
humanitarian needs,
providing such items as clothes and firewood. Above, she
and her colleagu,es
deliver
school supplies, snacks, candy and shoes to Serbian schoolchildren.




























Remembering
Bro. Patrich;
Tyrrell,
FMS,
'54
Bro. Patrick
Tyrrell,
FMS
'54,
a missionary
who was hon-
ored by
Japan's
chief of
state, Emperor
Akihito, and
Marist College for his de-
cades
of work
in
education
in
Japan,
died
Feb.
2 in the
Bronx, N.Y. He was
69.
The emperor and Japa-
nese government
awarded
Brother Patrick thie Blue
Medal of Merit in
1993
for
his
contributions to Japanese
secondary
education
and for promoting international
understanding
through his
long
service
in
the Rotary International Student Exchange
Program.
Brother
Patrick was only the sixth non-Japanese
person to receive the
distinguished
award since its inception
in
1881.
In
1996
Marist
College
honored Brother Patrick
by awarding
him
an
honorary
Doctor
of Humane
Letters.
Born
in
Manhattan,
Brother
Patrick graduated from
Cardinal
Hayes
High
School
in
the Bronx,
N.Y.
He entered
the Marist
Brothers
in
1948
and
professed
first vows in
1950.
He
earned
a bachelor's
in English
at what
was then Marian College
and professed
final vows in
1955.
Brother
Patrick
taught for a
term
at Cardinal Hayes
before
g1oing
to
Japan
in
1957.
After
learning
to speak
Japanese,
he
founded
Marist
High
School
in Kumamoto
and served
as its principal for
34
years.
He
was also
president
of
Kumamoto
High School
and of
Marist
International
Si:hool
in
Kobe.
Returning
to the United
States
in
1995,
he
served
as associate
director
of development
for
the Marist Brothers.
One of
his many
accomplish-
ments
was to triple the financial support
the
Brothers' Provincia1I
Office
has
been
able to bring to
the Marist
missions
over
the past
four
years.
Brother
Patrick
is survived
by a brother, John.
Christine
Baker
Trieste
and
her
husband, Christopher Trieste
'91,
now
have three children after the
birth of twins
in
September
2000.
She
is
busy educating and caring
for
the children. Christopher is
a
teacher and
tennis
coach for
the
Ossining (N .Y.) School
District
and
is publisher of
www.tennisedge.net,
a
tennis
e-zine.
I
Shreedar
Viswanathan
is a technical
man-
ager
at
Indus
Consultancy Services
in
Paramus, N.J.
I
Aaron
D. Ward
is
a news
anchor and
reporter at
Radio 810 WGY
in
Albany, N.Y.,
and is enjoying being
back in his
hometown
area.
1 9 9 4
Brian Adkins
teaches math at
Bunnell High School in Stratford,
Conn. He
is head
girls' soccer coach
at Bunnell as well as head boys'
lacrosse coach at Branford
High
School in Branford, Conn.
He
lives
m Milford, Conn.
I
Renee Parrott
Carolin is
a technical services ac-
countant manager for Ajilon
IT
Services
in
Syracuse, N.Y
For
the
first quarter
of
2000, Renee
was a
President's Club
winner.
II
Cynthia
Carroll
completed a
master's
in
professional
education
at
St.
Joseph's
University
in Philadelphia
and
has begun
a
doctoral program.
I
First Lt. Pamela
Ann
Clinton
graduated
from
Airbome School,
returned from
Korea and
is an
air-
borne military police plawon
leader
at
Fort Bragg,
N.C. She has
been
promoted to first lieuten;ant in
the
U.S.
Army. Pam was deployed with
the
so3n1
MP BN
(ABN) in
Kosovo
and has returned
to
Fo,n Bragg,
"home of the airborne and epicen-
ter
of
the
universe!"
I
Michael and
Cathy
Agolia Cote
bought a house
in the
town
of Poughkeepsie in
summer 2000. Michael
is
a staff
attorney with
the law
firm of
Spiegel, Brown, Fichera
&
Acard.
Cathy is a
pediatric
physical
thera-
pist
for
Rehab Programs, Inc. in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Joan
Crawford-
Spera
is director
of counseling
for
Family
Services,
Inc.
in
Poughkeepsie and is an adjunct
lecturer
in the
Social Work pro-
gram at
Marist.
I
Maria
Dryer-
Slabaugh
graduated from Fordham
University
in December
2000 with
an
M.B.A. in marketing and was
inducted
into Beta Gamma Sigma,
the M.B.A.-level honors society. She
is
senior
product
manager for
AdOne, an ASP for the
newspaper
industry located in
New
York
City.
I
Julie M. Forier is
a client
rela-
tionship
manager
at
Robert]. Reby
&
Company, Inc. in
Danbury,
Conn., a
financial
planning
firm.
I
Shannon
Roper
Gajarsky
will
be
an assistant professor
in the School
of Communication and
the
Arts at
Marist
College starting
this
fall. Cur-
rently
she
is
a
teaching
assistant in
the
fourth and
final
year of a
Ph.D.
program at
Rutgers
University,
completing
a dissertation
about
online identity and gender. She is
also an
adjunct
faculty member at
William
Paterson
University of New
Jersey.
I
Paul
Garnot
has lived in
Charleston, S.C., on a 35-foot sail-
boat for five years. He is food and
beverage
director
for Orient Ex-
press
Hotels.
I
Ann lmperatori
was
promoted
to
principal
at CPA
Services,
P.C.
in LaGrangeville,
N.Y.
I
Mary
Elizabeth
Keenan
has
relocated
to Drexel Hill,
Pa.,
and works as a commercial
credit
analyst in
the
Consumer Finance
Division
of MBNA American Bank.
I
Brian Laffin is
the
varsity
basket-
ball
coach at
Poughkeepsie High
School.
He also teaches
social
stud-
ies at
Poughkeepsie High
School.
He
is pursuing
a
master's
in
the
educational psychology program
at Marist.
I
Kirell Lakhman
is
a
managing
editor at
Reuters
News
Service.
I
Jennifer
Guzman
La Pietra
works with the New York
City
Early
Intervention
Program
authorizing therapeutic services to
infants and toddlers.
I
Nikki
LeSage
left
the corporate division
of
Time
Inc. for
a
position
in
adver-
tising
sales at
TIME
magazine. She
recently created
TIME's
"Digital
Dialogue,"
an online forum of
tech-
savvy
readers
who
regularly
share
their
opinions on
the
new digital
lifestyle.
I
Antonella Licari
was
promoted
to
manager of special
projects
at the ABC television
net-
work. She worked as control room
production
associate for ABC 2000,
which
won Emmy
and
Peabody
awards for its 24-hour
broadcast
of
millennium
celebrations around
the
world. She was also assistant
director
for ABC News's coverage
of
the political
conventions
in
Phila-
delphia
and Los Angeles.
I
Azulenis
Liriano
is living in
Florida and working for Premier
NEW
ARRIVALS
Jodi Ramey
'93
and
Kent
Lewis,
a
daughter,
Allison
Kaela,
May
26,
2000
Jennifer Smith
'93
and
Michael
Defelice '94,
a son, Robert
Anthony,
Nov.
10,
2000
Kristin Williams
'93
and
Harry
DiAdamo '93,
a daughter,
Sofia,
July
26,
1999
Moira
Breen '94
and Henry
Long,
a
son, Jacob
Anthony,
Nov.
23, 2000
Michelle Buebendorf
'94
and
Christopher
McCormack,
a son, Matthew
James,
July
9, 2000
Susan Connolly
'94
and
Sean Carroll
'94,
a son, Timothy
John,
May
27, 2000
Bonny Emmons
'94
and
Christopher
Algozzine '89,
a
daughter,
Andrea,
Dec.
19,
1996
and a son, Zachary,
March
26,
1999
Eliiabeth Noonan
'94
and Edwin
W,
Ryan
11,
a son,
Edwin
Wyckoff
111,
Dec.
14, 2000
Michele
Pendleton
'94
and
Glenn
Shepherd,
a son, Michael
Thomas,
Aug.
23, 2000
Sarah
and
Jeffrey Schanz
'94/'99
M,
a
daughter,
Madeline
Sophia,
March
27,
2001
Jennifer Smith
'94
and Steven
Frischknecht,
a son,
Kyle Benjamin,
July
26, 2000
Karen
and
Gregory F. Brown '95,
a
son, Nicholas
Tyler,
July
19, 2000
Melissa D'Angelo '95
and Mark
Galvin,
a daughter,
Erin Julia,
July
15, 2000
Heather
Griffen
'95
and Jason
Paul
Cosenza,
a son, Tyler
James,
March
16, 2000
Debra Mancuso '95
and Neil
Tomasetti,
a daughter,
Jaclyn
Rose,
Aug.
3,
1999
Carol Paldino
'95
and Christopher
Guerrette,
a son, Cristian,
Dec.
15,
1999
SU M \1 E R 2 0 0 1
43
































Alumni
NEW
ARRIVALS
Melissa Reynolds
'95
and Mark
Walton,
a daughter,
Amaya
Jade,
Feb.
8, 2000
Helen Schryver '95
and
J.
Doug
Jelen
'95, a son, Mathew
Raymond,
Aug.
10, 2000
Margaret
and
Peter Cipriano '96,
a
son,
Louis
Thomas
111,
May
20,
2000
Virginia Barnes '96
and
George
Siegrist '91,
a
daughter,
Madison
Mae,
May
22, 2000
Mary Ellen Clifford '95/'96 M
and
John Hynes '96,
a
daughter,
Mairead,
April 22, 2000
Amy and
Brian Grandjean
'96,
a son,
Noah Brian, Sept.
15,
2000
Jennifer Roth '96
and
Mark Roth,
a
daughter,
Zoey
Golden,
April 5, 2000
Jennifer
Trenary
'97
and
Joseph
Malcarne,
a son,
Caleb
William,
April 4,
2000
Rheam EI-Rouby '98
and Adam
Deans,
a son, Ryan
Alexander,
Oct. 25, 2000
Veronica Finch
'99
and
Derek
J.
Edwards,
a daughter,
Emily
Faith,
March 14, 2000
Vacation
Homes.
I
Claudine
Mar-
tini is public relations
counsel for
an
independent
software vendor
in
Silicon Valley, Cali:f.
I
Brian
Mccourt
has been promoted
to
director
of enterprise t•echnologies
for
Darwin
Partners
in
Wakefield,
Mass.
I
Patricia
Mc Ke
on has
been
promoted to vice president
and
controller ate-Commerce Solutions
L.L.C.
in Stamford, Conn.
I
Mat-
thew
Miller
graduated in
May 1999
with an M.B.A. in
marketing
from
Vanderbilt University.
]He isa
prod-
uct marketing
manager
for Veritas
Software in Mountain View, Calif.
I
Matthew
Muro
returned
from a
month-long vacation to
India
and
Nepal. He transferred
departments
at Harvard University
and is now
the
Web administrator
for
Harvard's
Division
of Continuing
Education.
I
Bryan
and[
Alexandra
Gonzalez Oles '95
are pursuing
graduate degrees in human
re-
source
management
and
industrial
relations at St.
Francis
University
in Pennsylvania.
I
Myles
Pinkney
and
his
wife, Sandra,
recently
won
the NAACP
Image
Award
for
Out-
standing Children's Literature for
their book,
Shades of Black:
A
Cel-
ebration of our Children.
Sandra
wrote
the
book and Myles, a
pho-
tographer, took the
photos that
appear in
it. The book, published
by Scholastic,
Inc.
in October,
has
been
very
favorably
1reviewed
in
Booklist,
Kirkus Reviews
and
the
Li-
brary Journal.
I
Vicki
Richter
won
a silver
medal
at U.S.
Rowing
Mas-
ters
Nationals in
Oakland, Calif.,
for the women's 8-plus category in
August2000.
IWTOL-TV,
the
CBS
affiliate
in
Toledo, Ohio, hired
Julie
A. Shrider
Roy
as special
projects
producer. Julie
produces series
pieces and
segments for
the
sweeps
rating periods.
I
Christina
Royal
was invited to speak at the New
Media Instructional
Design
Con-
ference
in Washington, D.C.,
in
November. She
is
director of cur-
riculum at the Beacon
Institute for
Learning
in
Plantation,
Fla.
I
Jef-
frey M.
Schanz ('99
M)
lives in
Clifton Park,
N.Y
with
his
wife,
Sarah,
their daughter, Elisabeth,
and
new
arrival Madeline Sophia.
Formerly alumni
director
at Marist,
he is
now
associate director of
alumni relations at
Rensselaer
Poly-
technic
Institute
in
Troy,
N.Y. The
Office of Alumni
Relations
at
Rensselaer
recently
received two
2001 Circle of
Excellence
National
Awards
from
CASE,
the
Council
Jeffrey
M,
Schanz
'94
for
Advance-
ment and Sup-
port
of Educa-
tion.
One is for
JefPs
Volunteer
Relations Pro-
gram, for
best
new program
initiative. Jeff
is
also the
new
president of
the
Albany chapter
of
the
Marist
Alumni
Association.
I
Lino
Sciaretta
has
been an
associate of
the law firm ofThacher Proffitt and
Wood
in
New York City since
May
2000.
I
Thomas Torrillo
has taken
a position
as senior programmer/
analyst
at TVEyes.com.
The
com-
pany
writessoflware that
"watches"
television for
other companies.
••
Tony Santiago '88, Caroline
Davis
'00, Luis
Franco
'81,. Stacey
Hernandez
'96 and Lou Santiago '98
were
members
of a recent alumni
panel for
the
Highe:r Education
Opportunity Program at
Marist
called "Transitions from the Neighborhood Culture to
the
College Community and Back."
44
M A R I
ST
M A
G
A
Z
I
N E
1 9 9 5
Yahairah Aristy
has
relocated
to
San
Diego,
Calif., where she
at-
tends Thomas
Jefferson School of
Law.
She
is
a child
development
specialist for
an
alternative incar-
ceration
therapeutic program
for
mothers
and their children.
Yahairah
has
a
master's
in clinical
psychology from Roosevelt Uni-
versity
in
Chicago, lll.
I
Jeanne
Brennan
continues to enjoy work-
ing as a medical
social worker. She
has
taken
a new position
with Good
Samaritan
Hospital
inSayville, N.Y.
I
Jillian
Caci teaches
music tech-
nologyatSouthJunior
High School
in
Newburgh, N.Y.
I
Nicholas
Capuano teaches
history at Mid-
land
Park, N.J. He was
appointed
head football
coach in
2000
and
now
coaches baseball as well.
I
Eric
Cavoli
was
promoted from
senior copywriter to
associate cre-
ative director at Lang
Durham
&:
Co.
in
West Hartford, Conn.
I
Danielle
Couture
works
in the
direct
marketing
department
of
LEGO Systems. She is
pursuing
a master's
from
Western
New
England College in Springfield,
Mass.
I
Deirdre Devlin
designs
Web pages for
Merck drug
prod-
ucts in the
I-communications de-
partment of
Merck&:
Co. She also
has
her
own business for
print
and
Web design called Giraphics.
I
Lori
DiDonato
is community coordi-
nator/supervisor
at
St. Anne Insti-
tute
in
Albany, N.Y., where she has
worked for
five
years.
I Tara
Dixon
has completed
a
master's in early
childhood education. She teaches
fourth grade
in Brooklyn Public
School
District
No. 22.
I
Michael
J.
Dunne
received an
M.S.W. from
Yeshiva University
in July
1999,
earning
Dean's List honors. Mike is
program
coordinator for Covenant
House
New
York
in Chelsea,
the
largest homeless shelter
in the
coun-
try. He invites
any
new
graduates
looking for
a
job
in
social work in
New
York
to contact him
at
(212)
727-4903.
I
Denis Farrell
is an
attorney for the New
York
State
Inspector
General's
Office in New
York,
N.Y.
I
Sarah
Pavilaitis
Farrell
is a school psychologist
for
the
Danbury (Conn.) School
Dis-
trict.
I
Marc
Gasperino
is
a
direc-
tor
at Christian
and Timbers, an
executive search
firm
in
New York,
N. Y.
IJ
ennif er
Donza
G
iammusso
isa first grade
teacher
at St.
Raphael
School in Long
Island
City, N.Y .
She is pursuing a
master's
in early
childhood education at St.
John's
University.
I
Luis
Gonell has a
small role
in
the
nlm
"Empire"
star-
ring
John
Leguizamo,
due out this
summer.
I Heatherly
Hane
is
a





















At the 2001 baccalaureate
ceremony
in the
Marist
chapel, Alumni Association
President
Maria
Gordon Shydlo
'87 (far left) and
Marist
President
Denni:s
Murray (far
right)
presented
the
Alumni Leadership
Award to
Maureen
M. Connolly
and Christopher
Matthew Blasie.
Each year
the association
recognizes
two seniors
for outstanding
leadership
and contributions
to the
campus
community.
Recipients
are
nominated
and elected by alumni employed at Marist.
special education
teacher for
Trumbull Public Schools in Con-
necucut. She
received
a
master's in
learning disabilities and emotional
disturbances in May
2000.1
Kersti
Hopkins received
a master's in so-
cial work from Rutgers University
in May 2000.
I
Asiflmran
is
living
in Georgia, working as a swck
trader for a company based
in
New
York.
I
Chasity Nadge Jaynes
is
transition manager at Cadaret,
Grant&Co., Inc.
in
Syracuse, N.Y.
I
Farah Joly
completed a master's
in human services from Audrey
Cohen College in
l
998and is work-
ing as a child protective special
supervisor.
I
Marie Meehan
Komisar
is director of develop-
ment and planning for
the
Conser-
vancy for Historic Battery Park in
New York City. The mission of the
not-for-profit conservancy is to re-
vitalize the Battery.
I
Cathleen
Kosiewicz
is the human resource
coordinator at GE Capital Corpo-
ration in Stamford, Conn. She is
currently enrolled in a master's
program in counseling and
human
resource development.
I
Frank
Kraljic
is the swimming coach for
Monsignor Farrell High School on
Staten lsland.
As
captain while a
Marist senior, Frank helped
lead
the Red Foxes to an
undefeated
season (10-0) and a MAAC cham-
pionship.
I
Steven
J,
Malkischer
(M.A.) has been named the new
principal ofWebutuck (N.Y.)
Jun-
10r-Senior High School. Steve was
previously the dean of students at
Spackenkill
High School
in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Rochelle
McDonough
is working for
the
New York State Police as. a crime
victims specialist in Poughkeepsie.
She will start graduate work in
social work and criminal justice in
the near future.
I
Monica Connors
McGlinchey
manages global pub-
lic
relations for
the
venture capital
division of Thomson Financial Se-
curities Data in Boston, Mass.
I
Nicole Milius
is an an buyer for
Dugan Valva Contess, a marketing
and communications
company
based in Morristown,
N .J.
I
Michael Murray
completed work
on
www.olympics.com
in Sydney,
Australia. He now works for IBM in
Hawthorne, N.Y., as a Web devel-
oper.
I
Kathleen
Nealon
is a
teacher
for
special needs students
in
second and
third
grades
in
West
Haven,
Conn.
I
Kimberly
Osterhoudt is
a special education/
trainer at the Children's Annex
in
Kingston, N.Y. Kim
is
pursuing a
master's in educational psychol-
ogy at Marist.
I
Victoria A. Perotti
is client service manager for
the
FLEX
Group in New York City.
I
Norine Mudrick Pigliucc:i
is a se-
nior production editor for John
Wiley
&
Sons in New York City.
I
Lisa Pleines
has
purchased
a
townhouse in South v\lindsor,
Conn., and is a programmer ana-
lyst
for Computer Science!; Corpo-
ration in Wethersfield, Conn.
I
Melissa Pouch
is a customer ser-
vice representative for the
Milwau-
kee Journal Sentinel.
I
Ember
Presler
received a master's in busi-
ness from Mount Saint Mary Col-
lege in Newburgh, N.Y.,
in
May
2000.
IJennifer
Pusatere
is direc-
tor
of annual giving at The Madeira
School in Mclean, Va. Jen lives in
Arlington, Va., and
is
a member of
the Alumni Executive Board.
I
Jayme Gabay Riekers is
pursuing
a master's in secondary education
while working two jobs.
I
Tricia
Shreve
moved to Connecticut
to
pursue a nursing specialty,
mental
health nurse practitioner, at Yale
University.
I
Brian
Smith
has been
named director of grassroots and
membership
legislative involve-
ment for the Food Marketing Insti-
tute in Washington, D.C. He heads
all state and federal grassroots pro-
grams for FMl's member compa-
nies, which are chain and
indepen-
dently owned supermarkets.
I
James
R.
Sullivan
has
taken
a po-
sition with the
Bangkok
office of
Credit Suisse First Boston. His
re-
sponsibilities include coverage of
the telecom, media and
Internet
sectors in a
research
capacity as
well as interaction with CSFB in-
vestment banking operations in
Thailand.
I
Claudine Tabacco
is
teaching third grade in the Danbury
(Conn.) School District.
I
Lisa
Valenti-Ghosh
was awarded an
M.S. in information systems in May
2000 from Pace University and has
taken a position with the Bank of
America.
I
Jane-Alyse Von Ohlen
was the focus of an article in the
Princeton, NJ, weekly
U.S. 1
this
past July. Jane-Alyse, who teaches
a course in creative training design
Keep Us
Up to Date
It's simple!
To continue receiving Marist
Magazine
and news and
information
from the Alumni
Affairs office, be sure to keep
Marist posted concerning
your snail-mail and e-mail
addresses.
It's never been
easier:
1.
Go to www.marist.edu/
alumni
2. Click on "Alumni"
3. Click on "On-Line Updates"
4. Input your
information
in
the spaces
provided
5. Click on "Submit."
That's it!
S U M M E R 2 0 0 I
45

























Alumni
Send Your News
By
e-mail
alumni@marist.edu
Online
www.marist.edu/alumni/
al
update.html
By
mail
Office
of Alumni Affairs
Marist College
3399
North Rd.
Poughkeepsie,
NY 12601-1387
46
M A R
I
S T
M A G A
Z
I
N E
at Mercer County Community Col-
lege
in
Trenton, N.j., gave tips on
making corporate
train
ingsessions
fun. She is the training: and devel-
opment manager at Virtua Health,
a
health
care system thtat runs five
hospitals and two nursing homes
in Burlington, Camden and
Gloucester counties.
~Mam-,m~
1
9 9 61
Anne
Tanner
Arent
is assistant
graphic designer for Oxford Health
Plans in Trumbull, Conn. She
also coaches the equestrian team
at Yale University.
I
Patricia
Bartholomew
is a primary school
teacher in the
Indian
Hi
II
Exempted
School District
in lndia,n
Hill. Ohio.
I
Stacey Berrios
has relocated to
Fort
Lauderdale,
Fla , for more
prosperous job opportunities with
Integrated
Regional Laboratories.
I
Gregg
Bibb
has been named di-
rector of public and media rela-
tions for the
National
Professional
Soccer League (NPSL). Gregg is
responsible for all aspects of media
relations for the NPSL, from writ-
ing and editing all news releases
and publications to maintaining
the league's Web site and working
closely with the 10 member clubs
and national media outlets.
I
Jen-
nifer Groot Brown
is a
marketing
consultant and office manager
for
her husband's family business, Ray
Brown
and Sons.
I
Jessica M.
Byrne
is a location coordinator for
the TV show "Law and Order."
I
Beth Canfield
expected
to
gradu-
ate with a professional
diploma
in
school psychology in December
2000. She externed with a school
psychologist
from
Palisades Public
Schools.
I
Anthony D. Carlucci,
Jr.
is a vice president of global
equities/Nasdaq
Trading
at
Salomon Smith Barney in New
York, N.Y.
I
Susan
Hoffman
Correll
graduated from Southern
Connecticut State University with
a master's
in
social work, summa
cum
laude.
She
has
accepted a po-
sition with the state of Connecticut
as a clinical social worker at Con-
necticut Valley Hospital in
Middletown, Conn.
I
Todd
Coulson
is a multimedia devel-
oper for Haley Productions
in
Me-
dia, Penn. Todd works with
Motorola,
KPMG
and the John
Heinz Wildlife Refuge on projects
that help sell, educate or promote
their products.
I
Kristin Wengert
Daly
is enrolled in a teacher certi-
fication program at Franklin Pierce
College. Kristin also works as a
technical writer for Western Con-
necticut State University
in the
university
computing department.
She is co-owner of a small produc-
tion business.
I
Alicia R. Damia
is
a
technical
writer for
the
Univer-
sity Computing Department at
Western Connecticut State Univer-
sity. Alicia
is
pursuing a master's in
community psychology and is co-
owner of a small production
busi-
ness.
I
Kristine Dawes
has been
promoted
to
Northeast region ac-
count manager for MTS Wireless
Components, a division of Ameri-
can
Tower
Corporation, in Water-
bury, Conn.
I
Raul De
La
Rosa
completed an M.B.A.
in
media
management
at Audrey Cohen
College. He traveled to
the
Cannes
Film Festival in France and worked
as an audience analyst for the me-
dia industries. He works at Macy's
as an executive
in
the Media De-
partment,
handling
broadcast and
radio advertising for various parts
vows
in 1951.
After excelling
in his studies at what was
then Marian College, he professed
final
vows in
1956
and went on to earn a doctorate in canon law from
the
Catholic University
of America.
In 1968
Brother Leonard became Provincial
of
the
Marist Brothers'
Esopus, N.Y., Province. In 1974 the
American Brothers elected him
to
the General Chapter
where he became Postulator General, a position
deal-
ing directly with the Vatican. While in Rome he edited
and published several volumes of letters by the founder
of the Marist Brothers,
Father
Marcellin
Champagnat,
and promoted the canonization
of Father Champagnat,
which came about
in
April
1999.
Remembering
Bro. Leonard
Voegtle, FMS '54
Upon
his return
to the United
States, Brother Leonard
put his canon law degree to use studying the validity of
marriages and the possibilities of annulments
in the
Archdiocesan
Tribunal
of New York in
1982,
the Dioc-
esan Tribunal in Wheeling, W.Va., from 1983 to
1987,
and the
Metropolitan
Tribunal
of Newark from
1992
to
1997.
In 1995
he
realized
his
dream of writing a history
of the Brothers in America with the publication of
Volume One of the
history,
Go to the Land I
Will
Show
You.
In 1997
he began pursuing in earnest his goal of
organizing an archive for
the
order's two
American
provinces, taking up
full-time
residence in
Esopus
to
devote himself to that project.
Bro. Leonard Voegtle, FMS '54,
remembered
as a bril-
liant man dedicated to documenting
and preserving
the
history of the American Marist Brothers,
died March 31
in Kingston, N.Y. He was 68.
Born in
New
York City, Brother Leonard attended
Mount
Saint Michael ,Academy
in
the
Bronx,
N.Y.
He
entered
the
Marist Brothers
in
1947
and professed first
Brother Leonard was
known
not only for his schol-
arly endeavors but also for his diligence
in
correspon-
dence. During
his lifetime
he
wrote thousands of letters
and e-mails to current and former Brothers. Those
Brothers stationed overseas who were on
his
mailing
list greatly enjoyed
his
updates on life
back home.




















Sons and Daughters
of Alumni Make
Graduating
from Marist a Family Tradition
The family of Fred
Weiss
'66 (left to right): Kelley,
Katherine, Krysta
'01,
Fred and Karen at Commencement 2001.
of
the
country as
well
as
placement
for all ethnic
papers. He is also
working on his own company,
Melecon Productions,
L.L.C.,
which is dedicated to
the promo-
tion
and advancement of the Latino
culture.
I
Mary De Lara-Gamory
is pursuing a
master's inearlychild-
hood education at Lehman Col-
lege.
I
Lynne Dominick
isa health
care consultant for Covance
Health
Economics
and Outcomes Services,
a pharmaceutical
and medical
de-
vice company
in
Gaithersburg,
Md.
I
Kathleen Doody
is the senior
account manager of
digital
content
at Barnes & Noble.com
in
New
York, N.Y.
Ijames
Duer
is
a labo-
ratory manager for
QuES&T,
an
environmental
consulting
company
in
HopewellJunction,
N.Y.
IJames
Ellis has
been promoted to
man-
ager of vocational counseling and
training at Gateway Community
Industries
in Kingston, N.Y.
I
Alaina Evangelista
has accepted a
position as assistant
registrar
at
Lasell College
in
Newton,
Mass.
I
Melanie
Fester
is
a
recruiter
in the
magazine and
Internet
industries,
helping people
find
opportunities
in marketing,
promotion and ad
sales.
I
Susanne
Fischer
is
the
special sections coordinator
for the
advertising department of the
Poughkeepsie
Journal.
I
Brian
Frankenfield is
a
full-time M. B.A.
student at Bentley College
in
Waltham, Mass.
He received
an
\I.A.
m technical and
professional
wntmg
from
Northeastern Univer-
sity.
I
Mary
Gamory is pursuing
a
master's in early childhood educa-
uon
at Lehman College.
I
Joshua
Gaynor
has moved from San Di-
ego to Berkeley,
Calif.,
to begin
a
new JOb as
the
academic program
coordinator at
the
University of
California at
Berkeley. In his
spare
time,
Josh
rows with
the
men's
master's
team
at the
lake
Merritt
Rowing
Club, where he also
coaches
the
women's
master's
team.
He
was recently certified as a level
II Rowing
coach
through
U.S.
Row-
ing.
I
Tanya
R.
Goldberg is
a
tattoo artist,
textile
desi;gner
and
scrimshander at
Medusa
'Tattoo in
New
York
City. "I
make
everyone I
tattoo
look
at
my
degree!" she
writes.
I
Ann
P. Hanley
works for
a corporate
relocation
company,
WOT North American, in New
York, N.Y. She is also pursuing a
master's
in
education
at
Monmouth
University.
I
Christopher Heath
has
left
the U.S. Department of
Defense and
is now
a senior
net work engineer with
Energy-
Pavilion.com, an energy
industry
e-commerce portal,
in
Vienna, Va.
I
Christine
Helling
has
been pro-
moted
to
managing
editor at Edu-
cational Design, an educational
test
prep
publisher located in SoHo.
I
Stacey
Hernandez
is working on
a
master's in
the
Urban
Affairs
Pro-
gram at Queens College. Stacey
has enlisted
in
the New York Army
Reserves
as a military
polke
officer
and
has been
admitted to
the
New
York
City Police Academy·.
I
Suzie
Hieter
is a social worker for chemi-
cally
addicted
adolescents at
Daytop Village in Rhinebeck, N.Y.
I
Todd
A. Kara
isa New York State
trooper
working
in
the
Poughkeepsie
area.
I
Jennifer
Karayeanes
is assistant nnedia
di-
rector at Young
&
Rubicam.
I
Kim
Kelly
is
in the second year of a
Ph.D.
program
in
clinical
psychol-
ogy at St.
John's
Univ,ersity.
I
Angelo
"Archie"
Leona1rdis
was
Eleven graduates
joined their
parents in the ranks of Marist alumni
May
19 at
the
college's 55th commencement ceremony.
Following
in
a parent's footsteps were:

Jennifer Breslin,
daughter
of Shelley Breslin '85

Jeff Cervone, son of Nancy Cervone '98
M
• Hope
Donohue, daughter of
Ed Donohue
'55 and Nancy O'Brien
Donohue '76/'01
M

Scott
Fischer,
son of Eileen Fischer '97

Nicholas Gildard, son of John Gildard '74/'92
M

Allysha Hayter-Bomba,
daughter of Carol
Hayter-Bomba
'91

Elizabeth
lanelli,
daughter of Robert
lanelli
'73

Jesseca
Kelly, daughter of Julie Kelly
'00

Kevin
Porter, son of Bill Porter '72/'91 M and Carol Welz Porter
'72

Jennifer
Starzyk,
daughter of
Thomas
Starzyk '70

Ryan Streck,
son of Ronald Streck '65

Ed
Synan, son of Edward Synan '70

Krysta
Weiss, daughter of Fred Weiss '66.
Incoming Marist freshmen or transfer students who are sons or
daughters of a Marist graduate are eligible to apply for the Alumni
Legacy
Scholarship
sponsored by
the
Alumni Association.
One S 1,000
scholarship is awarded each fall based on academic performance,
extracurricular
activities and community service.
promoted
to manager of
the
401
K
profit-sharing
division of Citistreet
in
New Brunswick, NJ
I
Heather
Hyland Leonardis
is director of
sales and
marketing
communica-
tions for Kid
Designs,
Inc., a tO)'
manufacturer in Rahway, N.j.
I
Diane M. Lieberman,
C.P.A.,
has
joined
the
accounting and busi-
ness consulting firm of
Judelson,
Giordano&: Siegel, C.P.A., P.C. as
a staff accountant.
I
Beth Kershaw
Mahoskey
has
been
promoted to
director
of special events for
Marymount College
in
Tarrytown,
N Y.
I
Christine Manna
is
an ac-
count executive at Boardroom
Communications, one of South
Florida's
largest
public
relations
firms.
I
Amy McHugh
received
an
MS. in speech-language
pathol-
ogy
from MGH lnstitute
of Health
Professions
in
September
l
999. She
is a
speech-language
pathologist
in
Chelsea, Mass.
I
Darrah Metz
re-
ceived a
master's from Marshall
University in
December
1998
and
was named the NCAA Graduate
Assistant Coach of the Year
in
women's basketball. She
is
cur-
rently
a full-time
member
of
the
Thundering
Herd
staff, which par-
ticipates
in
the
other MAC,
the
Mid-American Conference.
I
Allyson Mongrain
is
global cor-
porate communications manager
with
Beyond Interactive, a
digital
advertising agency with
locations
around
the world. Allyson lives
in
Hoboken,
N
.).,
and divides hertime
between her company's offices
in
New York, N.Y., and San Fran-
cisco, Calif.
I
Patricia
U. Noble
received an M.S.
in
organizational
leadership from Mercy College in
Ma}' 2000.
I
Cathleen
O'Brien
works as an independent market-
Is it your
reunion year?
It is
if
you graduated
in
1951,
1956,
1961,
1966,
1971,
1976,
1981,
1986,
1991 or 1996.
What's so great
about reunions?
Old friends, favorite faculty,
Hudson River beauty and
Marist pride.
On the fence
about attending?
Go
immediately
to
the Marist Web
site
at
www.marist.edu/alumni
and check out your reunion
class
page.
It will bring back
memories
and tell
you
what's
in
store for your
class.
SUM
\1[
R 2 0 0
t
47







































Alumni
Marist Running
Standout Wins
National Recognition
By Pete Colaizzo
'86
Mike
Melfi
'99, Marist's Male
Athlete of the
Year in 1999,
has
ing
and
advertising consultant,
developing
direct
mail ,campaigns
and providingcopywritingservices
for new
Internet
businesses.
I
CashaJoefield
Parker
is
pursuing
a
master's
in
environmental sci-
ence and expects
to
graduate in
December 2002.
I
Yasmin Aristy
Parker
earned a master's
in
human
relations
in
May
2000.
She also
spent
four
years
in
the U.S. Army
working as a
medical
supply spe-
cialist. She left
the
Army
in
August
2000 and
is
pursuing
a counseling
career
in
Germany.
II
Michael
Pistello
is
pursuing
a
graduate
degree from Syracuse University.
He
expects
to
graduate in June
2001, after which time
he
will
be
moving
to
Los
Angeles.
I
Dr.
Tho-
mas M. Rocchio
has
graduated
from Temple University School of
Podiatric Medicine and
has
begun
a four-year surgical residency in
foot
and
ankle surgery.
II
Alison
K.
Southey
is
pursuing a master's in
reading/language arts education
at
Central Connecticut State Univer-
sity.
I
Ramsey Whitworth is
an
associate at
the law
firm of Niles,
Barton and Wilmer
in
Baltimore,
Md., and
has
passed the
Pennsyl-
vania
bar
exam.
I
Matt Wiggin
has
been
appointed executive
aide
to
Lucian Pawlak,
the mavor
of New
Britain, Conn. Matt
kee'ps
the
lines
of communication open
between
the
mayor's office and other city
departments.
I
Melissa Zobel
is
pursuing a graduate
degree in
so-
cial work concentrating on
policy
and advocacy at the Catholic Uni-
versity of America.
1
9 9 7
Geoffrey Ayres
is a
technical
in-
frastructure
analyst at
Emisphere
Technologies,
Inc. in
Tarrytown,
N.Y.
I
Melani Bendfeldt
is an
in-
structional
technologist
for the
Lower
Hudson
Regional Informa-
tion
Center
in
Tarrytown, N.Y.
I
Theresa Breen
has
received
a
master's
in
teaching
from Fordham
University.
She
teaches
fourth grade
in the Lakeland Central School
District
in Westchester County,
N
.Y.
I
Laura Casavant is
a special
education teacher at the
Hartford
Transitional
Leaming
Academy
in
Hartford,
Conn.
I
Jason
Daingerfield
has
made a career
change to the
IT
industry. He
is a
software
developer
with User
Friendly Computers,
Inc.
I
Grayson DeWitt
is a high school
history
teacher
and hockey coach
at Smith Vocational
High
School in
Westhampton, Mass.
I
Erica
Wittman Delorey
works at EMC
Corp. in New York,
N.Y.1
Carmela
Del Vecchio
is a production coor-
dinator for MTV
News
and spe-
cials, working on programs such as
"Diary"
and "Ultra Sound."
I
Greg
Der Calousdian
is
resource
man-
ager for
Intrinsic
Technology
in
Stamford, Conn.
He
develops high-
profile
technology teams fore-com-
merce
and
financial
firms.
I
Deirdre H. Finnegan
is
the
opera-
tions
manager at the oldest film
house in the city of Philadelphia,
FMP Visual Communications (for-
merly
Film
Makers of Philadelphia),
an all-encompassing
production
and Web-casting/streaming
house.
I
Kara Flynn
is
a free-lance
music
writer for the Springfield Newspa-
pers in
Springfield, Mass. She also
is
the young-adult
librarian
at the
Boys
and
Girls Library at the
Westfield Athenaeum in Westfield,
Mass.
I
Carl Graf is
an editor with
CNN
Financial
Network
in
New
York,
N.Y.
I
Amy Hoey
isa
teacher
at
the Institute
of Notre Dame
High
School in Baltimore, Md. Amy also
coaches
the
varsity
lacrosse
and
crew teams.
I
Thomas Holmes
is a
graphic designer and digital video
editor for
the
New York Network,
located
in
the Alfred E. Smith Build-
ing in Albany, N.Y. The company
works in conjunction with New
York State Gov. George Pataki's
press
office and
the
SUNY
distance
learning
program.
I
Andrea
Johnson is
assistant production
manager at
Rizzoli
International
Publications
in
New
York, N.Y.
I
Kristen Koehler
received
an M.A.
from Seton Hall University and
has
accepted a position with CBS Sports
as an assistant
in
the
programming
department working on
the
NCAA
account.
I
James McGurk
re-
searches
technology
firms for Coqui
Capital Partners, an early-stage
ven-
ture capital firm in
New
York, N.Y.
I
Sonya
Mello
is pursuing a
master's in education at the Col-
lege of St. Rose in Albany, N.Y.
Sonya
hopes
to become a
high
school English
teacher.
She
previ-
ously worked as a human
resource
specialist for Pitney Bowes
in
Stam-
ford,
Conn.
I
Janet Cacace
Novoselich
and
her
husband,
convention
in
May, where
he
picked up his award.
Alumni Compete in
Boston Marathon
Mike Melfi '99
The award puts Mike in
some good company. Most
recent winners include Dave
Morris {U.S. marathon
record holder and past
Chicago Marathon cham-
pion), Jerry
Lawson
(former
Marist College was well-represented
at the 2001 Boston Marathon this
past April as two graduates from the
class of 2000 placed in the top 500
overall in the famed 26.2-mile race
from Hopkinton to Boston.
been chosen
the
2000 Road Runners Club of
America (RRCA)
Open Male Runner of the Year.
U.S. marathon record holder and past Chicago
winner) an,d
Keith
Brantly {former
U.S. marathon
Olympian).
Mike currently
runs
for the Fila-spon-
sored Syracuse Chargers
Track
Club, which nomi-
nated him
for the award.
• Jeff
Grady
'00
was
167'
h
overall
out of a field of roughly
15,000
starters. His time was 2:42:09,
which averages out to a 6:11
pace per mile.
Mike had an excellent year on
the
roads in
2000, winning several events and placing as the
top
American in some of the toughest and deep-
est
road
racing
fields
in
the Eastern United
States. He received an expenses-paid weekend
in Albuquerque,
N.M.,
site of the RRCA
annual
48
M A R
I
S
T M A G
A Z I N E
Pete
Colaizzo
'86
is
Maris/'s
men's
cross
country
and
track
coach
..
• Tom
Henry
'00
was 449'
h
overall with a time of 2:52:03,
which averages out to a 6:36
pace per mile.
• Todd Coulson
'96 had a strong
run too, finishing his third
Boston Marathon
in
3:14:19.
-Pete
Colaizzo
'86
I






























Brian,
have
moved
from
Connecti-
cut
to
Georgetown, Texas. She is
a
technical
publications
coordinator
and writer for
Dell
Computers.
I
Joy Providenti
teaches a self-con-
tained social studies classroom at
Lynbrook High
School on
Long
Island.
She also
attends
Hofstra
University, where she
is pursuing
a
master's in special education.
I
Rose Raus
has been promoted
to
assistant director of public affairs
at Sawchuk, Brown Associates in
Albany, N.Y.
I
Daryl Richard
was
promoted
to
account supervisor at
Miller/Shandwick Technologies in
Boston, Mass., and manages a vari-
ety of accounts for high-tech
cli-
ents including Xerox, Fujitsu and
ebix.com.
I
Kristin Richard is
a
graduate student at New York Uni-
versity, pursuing an M.S. in
maga-
zine publishing.
I
Ada Robinson-
Perez
is pursuing a master's in
social work at Syracuse University.
I
Cynthia
L
Saporito has
been
promoted
to
vice president of
mar-
keting for Sawyer Savings
Bank
in
Saugerties,
N. Y.
I
Lauren
Schneidmuller
was
promoted
to
producer at Publicis, Inc., an ad-
venisingagency in New York, N .Y.,
where she has worked for almost
four years.
I
Erika
Scinto
is pursu-
ing a graduate degree in school
counseling at
the
University of
Colorado at Denver. She
is
also
teachingat
Littleton High School.
I
John
S. Seifert
is a senior claims
representative for Liberty Mutual
and
is
pursuing an M.B.A. at Seton
Hall.
I
Barbara
Smith
is
pursuing
a degree in industrial hygiene and
occupational safety at the Univer-
suy of Connecticut. Barbara is an
engineering technician with Pratt
&
Whitney in East Hartford, Conn.
I
Kelly Tiernan
isa technical asso-
ciate at CNBC in Fort Lee, NJ She
also freelances at Fox News Chan-
nel in New York, N.Y.
IM.
Lorena
Vanegas isa
human
resource
asso-
ciate with the American Lung As-
sociation. Lorena lives in New York,
N.Y., with her daughter, Ileana.
1
9 9 8
Erin Cotter
sends greetings to
her
fellow
1998
classmates. Erin is a
counselor/teacher of at-risk youth
in an alternative education setting
at Eckerd Youth Alternatives
in
Boomer, N.C.
I
Patrick M.
Cuddy
1s the East Coast sales manager for
the Intercom Division of ELBEX
America and is the owner of Cuddy
Marketing, a
network
distribution
company based in Washingtonville,
N.r
I
Lora Fischer
DeWitt
is the
head fashion buyer at FACES
in
\orthampton,
Mass.
I
Michele
Donovan
was promoted
to
junior
financial
analyst in the
water
parks
and
miniature
golf finance office
at
Walt
Disney
World in Orlando,
Fla.
I
Jennifer Dreyer
received
an
M.S. in
education with distinction
in May 2000
from Hofstra Univer-
sity. She
teaches
studio art and
photography
for grades
nine
through
12
in
the
Bellmore
Merrick
School
District
and
Mep
ham
High
School.
I
Kristen Dre:yer
is an
account executive at Betsey
Johnson
inNewYork,N.Y.
IKerrii
Flannery
has
completed certification require-
ments
to become a
New York State
emergency medical technician.
Kerri
is a special education
teacher
at Suffern High School in Suffern,
N.Y.
I
Jun Fujimori
is
a
vocational
peer advocate at PEOPLE,
Inc.
Her
position is part
of a
pilot
program
called "The Milestones
Project" that
helps people with mental
health
issues return
to
work.
II
Michael
Goot
is a copy editor for
The Post-
Star
in Glens Falls, N.Y.
I
Daniel
Henn
graduated from th,ejohn
H.
Stamler Police Academy iin
Decem-
ber
1999.
He
is
a patrolman with
the New Providence (N
.].)
Police
Department.
I
James Huben
has
been
appointed
to
the staff of New
York
State Gov. George Pataki.
I
Wendy A. Kenerson
received a
master's
in
social work
from
South-
ern Connecticut State University
and is a
clinical therapist at the
Children's
Center
in Hamden,
Conn.
I
Kimberly Garrett Lamey
has moved with her
husband, Lt.
Michael Lamey,
from
West Point,
N.Y.,
to
Colorado Spring;s, Colo.
I
Mathew Laskowski
is a
paralegal
specializing in asbestos defense liti-
gation with the
law
firm of Porzio,
Bromberg
&
Newman., P.C. in
Morristown,
N
.J.
I
Elizabeth
McCarthy
has
started
11
club on
Yahoo.com for
Marist
alumni at
http:
I
!clubs.yahoo. com/clubs/
maristcollegealumni.
I
:Shannon
McNamara
is the
assistant
box
of-
fice manager at the Performing Arts
Center
at
SUNY
Purchase:.
I
Frank
J.
Maduri
works for
Robertet
Fla-
vors, Inc., marketing
flavors to
major
food and
beverag,e
compa-
nies.
I
Melissa Manso
has been
promoted to associate pr-oducer at
World Wrestling Federation En-
tertainment,
Inc.
in Stamford,
Conn. Melissa also appeared on an
MTV special about what. goes on
behind the scenes of the WWF.
I
Edward
Millar
is an adjunct pro-
fessor
of writing at Manhattanville
College in Purchase, NY
I
Mel-
issa Monahan
is
a
repoirter/news
editor for the
Dateline Journal
in
Passaic,
NJ Melissa hosts a pro-
gram on the local television station
and is studying at
the
American
Academy of Dramatic Arts
in
New
York, N.Y.
I
Lauren Murphy
has
earned an M.A. in school psychol-
ogy
from
Fairfield University. She
is
now pursuing a C.A.S. in school
psychology.
I
Kerry Peterson
is a
marketing communications man-
ager
for
Merit
Industries,
a manu-
facturer of touch-screen
video
games
in
Philadelphia, Pa.
I
Suheil
Pimentel
has
been
accepted into
the
NYU
Media
Ecology
Program.
She continues to work at McCann
Erickson
in
New York, N.Y.
I
Me-
lissa Podgurski
teaches Spanish
in the Tredyffrin/Easttown School
District
in Wayne,
Penn.
I
Bob
J.
Roberts
has completed two years
as a
psychologist's
assistant
for the
Ulster and Greene County Asso-
ciation of Retarded Citizens.
I
Holly
Robinson
is in Rutgers
Law School
in Camden, NJ
I
Juana Oenny)
Rivera
is program coordinator for
the
Newburgh, N.Y, YMCA. She
has
been accepted to Mount
Saint
Mary College
in
Newburgh in
the
Graduate Education
department.
I
Luis Santiago
is assistant
director
of admissions at Marist by
day
and
a professional wrestler by
night.
Lou
is working on
the independent
circuit as "Da Puerto
Rican
Night-
mare,"
Diab
lo
Santiago. Since turn-
ing
pro during the past year, Lou
has
won
the
U.S. Championship
belt in the World of
Hurt
Wres-
tling. He also received
the tag
teams
belt in
the
Millennium Wrestling
Association.
I
Bethann Stanger
is
a
research
analyst for Massachu-
setts State Representative
Daniel
E.
Bosley,
handling human
services
policy issues. She graduated
from
the University of Connecticut
School of Social Work with an
M.S.W.
in
May 2000.
I
Nicole
Whittingham
has
taken
a
job
with
Coach,
the
leather goods company.
I
Alicia Zadrozny
is a reporter/
staff writer for
the
Dateline
Journal
in
Passaic, NJ Alicia loves learn-
ing about the many cultures of the
area
and
chronicling the stories of
the
people she
meets.
She is study-
ing Spanish at a local college.
1 9 9 9
Richard Ahlborn
(M.P.A.) was
promoted
to
lieutenant colonel/as-
sistant
deputy
superintendent for
administration for the New York
State
Police.
I
Russell R. Boedeker
has earned
the
Certified
in
Finan-
cial Management (C.F.M.) desig-
nation awarded by
the Institute
of
Certified Management Accoun-
tants. He lives in Portland, Ore.
I
Bill Brennan
has
been teaching
science for two years at
the
Island
Trees School
District
in Levittown,
N.Y. He is pursuing a
master's
in
IN
MEMORIAM
Marist
College
mourns
the loss of
these
former
members
of
the Marist
community.
Alumni
Bro. Adolphe
Leo Labonte

48
Frank
Moran
'54
Bro. Patrick
J. Tyrrell
'54
Bro.
Leonard
Voegtle
'54
Vincent
J. Hall '62
Raymond
E.
Waters
'62
(aka Bro. Laurence
Matthews)
Manuel
D. Locastro
'66
Jerrold
Hastings
'67
Joseph
F. Celie
'69
John
M. Kelly
'70
James
J. O'Neill
'70
Vincent
M.
Sterlacci
'71
Louis
R. Bryant
'73
Edward
H.
Burns
'73
Robert
J.
Hanna
'74
Michael
J.
Vlosky
'77
Rudolf
H.
Reichelt
'78
Dr. Carl
L.E.
Grant
'79
John
Pitti
'84
David
R.
Heacock
'85
Margaret
Annette
Martin
'86
Patricia
Garrymore
'87
George
Michael
Bukantis
'88
Gerard
"Jerry· F. Murphy
'90
Kevin
lake
'91 M
Lula
M.
Johnson-Milligan
'95
M
Louis
G. Rutigliano
'97
Tom
R. Sammarco
'97
Retirees
Marian
Nichols
Elizabeth
"Betty" O'Brien
Marion
H. Strickland
SUM
M E R 2 0 0 1
49






















Alumni
educational technology at C.W.
Post.
I
Peter Brown
bought a
house
in the
Bronx
and
is
working for
worldwide public relations com-
pany Rapp
Collins as
an account
executive for Daimler Chrysler/
Mercedes. He
has also
started an
events
planning
company.
I
Jenni-
fer
Canonico teaches
fourth grade
at St. Anthony of
Padua
School in
West Harrison, N.Y. She is pursu-
ing a master's
in
literacy
education
at
the
College of New
Rochelle
in
New
Rochelle,
N.Y.
IJu:stin
Chase
has
graduated
from
the New York
City Police Academy.
He
is assigned
to Police Service Area 6
in
New
York City's
Harlem-Washington
Heights
neighborhoods.
I
Francis
(Frank)
P. Christensen
is a cap-
tain
with
the
New
York
State
Police
and
Zone
2 commander for
the
State Police in Wappingers
Falls,
N.Y.
I
Steven M. Conroy
attends
medical school with his
fiancee
at
the
University of Nova Southeast-
ern in South Florida.
He
is
also
working on a master's: in
public
health.
I
Christine D~mielowich
is
a certified social worker for four
early
intervention
class:es at Little
Village School
in
Bellhmore, N.Y.
Chris also assists with setting
up
services for children,
ages
birth to
three, who have develop-
mental delays.
I
Nancy
Davies
has started a Web community
(www.adultstudentcenter.com)
for
adult students to encourage
them
to
return
to
college and
to help
them get
through
their courses.
The effort
makes
use of her educa-
tion in business,
psychology and
information
systems
plus
the whole
experience of going to college as a
"non-traditional"
student.
I
Bianca
Delorenzo
completed
a master's
in
social work from SUNY Albany
in
May 2000 and
is
working for
the
NYS Division of the
Budget
as a
budget
examiner for the Mental
Health
and Substance Abuse
unit.
Her daughter,
Oamani,
is in Pre-K
and can write all of
her
leners
and
numbers.
I
Sue
Devito
is a gradu-
ate assistant at Syracuse University
and expects to graduate in 2001.
I
Dana Greenberg
has
been
pro-
moted
to
senior case manager with
a runaway and homeless youth
program
at Catholic Charities in
Oneida, N.Y.
I
Lauren Guerriero
is
assistant
to the
editor-in-chief of
Country
Living,
a Hearst publica-
tion.
I
Suzann E. Kettler
received
a master's from Fordham Univer-
sity and
is
a certified social worker
counseling substance abusers at
Turning
Point for Saint Francis
Hospital in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Chris-
topher LaTuso
(M.8.A.)
isa project
manager
for HOR Engineering,
Inc.
in White Plains, N.Y.
I
Charles
Leone
has
been promoted to ac-
count executive at Mindstorm
Communications, a public
relations
firm in New York, N.Y.
I
Christo-
Faculty
who retired
following the spring
2001
semester
after many
years
of service
were (left to right) Gerard
A. Cox, Vice PresidenUDean
for Student
Affairs, 34 years
of service;
Dr. Peter
O'Keefe,
associate
professor
of history, 34 years;
Dr.
Edward O'Keefe, professor
of psychology,
40 years;
Dr.
Eileen Taylor-Appleby,
assistant
professor
of social work,
19
years; Douglas
C.
Cole, professional
lecturer of media arts, 15 years;
Dr. Richard
W. Platt,
associate
professor
of media arts, 25 years; and Dr. Louis C. Zuccarello,
professor
of
political science,
35 years.
50
M A R
I
ST
\t
A G A Z
I
N E
pher Manriquez's new
title
is mar-
keting specialist for Latin America
and the Caribbean at
Pearson
Edu-
cation Publishing, a job which al-
lows him
to
travel
throughout
Latin
America.
I
Federico
Manriquez
teaches
elementary
school in
Kailua, Hawaii.
I
Michael Melfi
was chosen
the 2000 Road Run-
ners Club of America Open Male
Runner of
the
Year. (See
the
article
on
Page
48 for more on Mike.) In
August he was the first American
finisher at the
Chris Thater Memo-
rial
SK Run
in
Binghamton, N.Y.,
with a
time
of
14:30.
I
Julie Morin
is
assistant
to the
editor-in-chief of
Classic
American Homes
magazine.
I
Steven
Napolitani
is assistant
producer
for Dutch Productions.
He
edits and produces for Madison
Square Garden events
in
New
York,
N.Y.
I
Rachel Oswald
is
assistant
director
of financial aid at Dutchess
County Community College
in
Poughkeepsie.
I
Ivy
Reeves
is
as-
sistant director of student activities
at Marist.
I
Rafaelina Rivas is
a
legal assistant in the
international
corporate global asset finance and
Latin American
banking division
of Link, Late rs and Alliance,
a Lon-
don-based
international law
firm.
I
Amy
Rys
teaches third
grade at
Kreiger
Elementary School
in
Poughkeepsie. She
is
also
pursuing
a master's at SUNY New Paltz.
I
Stephanie
Sardilli
teaches
first
grade in the Mahopac
(N.Y.)
Cen-
tral School
District.
I
Jennifer
Scheulen
teaches
sixth grade and
coaches girls' middle school soccer
in
Upper Saddle River, N.J.
I
Tho-
mas
Schwab
has
been promoted
to global news editor with PR
Newswire in
jersey
City, N.j. Tom
also received a Global
Editorial
Per-
formance Award.
I
John Svare
worked as
the
deputy campaign
manager
for Congressman
Maurice
Hinchey
in
Binghamton,
N.Y, this
past fall.
I
Desire
Treski has
taken
a
new
job as a museum educator
for a children's museum
in
Troy,
N.Y.
2 0 0 0
Caroline Davis
is a research
ana-
lyst
with ASCAP,
the
American
Society of Composers, Authors and
Publishers.
I
Monique Faggins
is
a credit analyst at Ellenville Na-
tional Bank
in
Ellenville, N.Y.
IJill
Giocondo
is a reporter for
the
Fin-
ger Lakes Times
in Geneva, N.Y.
She covers the communities of
Lyons and Wolcott, state police
and the Wayne County Board of
Supervisors.
I
Susan Goulet
is
assistant director of admissions for
the Office of Admissions and En-
rollment Planning at Marist.
I
Jes-





























Students
and alumni
turned out
to honor
Spanish
professor
Dr. Rallmond
Weiss' 49
and
celebrate
the dedication
of the Raymond
F. Weiss Multimedia
Language
Center. The center opened
last
fall
within
Marist's
James
A.
Cannavino
Library
to support
instruction
and research
in
foreign
languages,
foreign cultures and
international
studies
across
the curriculum.
Those
in
attendance
included
(left to
right) Kevin
Mastriano '01,
Joy
Schoolcraft
Manstream
'97, Dana M.
Spano
'97,
Martha Corliss Brajuha
'72, Nlancy
E. Gargaro
Vodrazka
'71,
Ludy
Morales-
Rivera
'73, Kathleen
M. Blank
'74, Lisa
A. Calapa Schofield '75, Modern
Languages
Department Chair Irma
Blanco Casey,
Leah
Duggan
'01, (seated) Bro.
Thomas
Delaney, FMS '59,
Bro.
John Malich,
FMS
'59 and
Assistant
Professor
Emeritus
of
Modern
Languages
Maurice
Bib11au
'54.
sica
Greer
is a first- and second-
grade consultant special education
teacher
m Averill Park, N.Y.
I
Raychel Grestini
is
pursuing
a
master's in social work at SUNY
Albany. She was to graduate in
May
2001.1
Patrick La Croix
isan
assistant account executive with
Catalyst Marketing Communica-
tions,
Inc. Pat is responsible
for
research,
copywriting and media
scheduling for a number of the
firm's clients.
I
Suzanne Lowry
is
a graduate assistant/resident
direc-
tor
at Iona College as she
pursues
a
master's
in
public relations.
I
Kristyna McMahon
is a junior Web
designer at 1-800-flowers.com in
Garden City, N.Y.
I
Jennifer
Matarazzo
is an editorial assistant
with Fitness
Magazine
in New York,
t\.Y
I
Beth Mathewson
is
a spe-
cial educauon teacher at
Holomua
Elementary School in Hawaii.
Holomua is
Hawaii's first
multi-
track
elementary
school and as such
was awarded nauonal recognition.
I
Crosby
Munro
has retired
from
the l 5 Army.
He
is
now
a senior
Armr instructor
at
Lincoln High
'>chool
mJersey City, NJ
I
Emily
Pereira
1s a
Junior
environmental
sc1em1st
for the Chazen Compa-
nies m Poughkeepsie. She is
re-
sponsible for water and soil sam-
pling
and
investigative
tasks asso-
ciated with
Phase
I
and Phase
11
environmental site assessments and
subsurface investigations.
I
Steve
Pifferi,
Mike McCarthy
and
Mike
Press
moved
to New
Jersey from
Connecticut
to
work
in
New
York
City and Weehawken,
N.J.
I
Liza
Porcelli
is a
special education
teacher
in
the Hawthorne-
Roosevelt
Elementary
School in
Hawthorne,
NJ
I
Nichollas
Ross
is pursuing a M.F.A.
in
computer
ans
animation
at
the
Aca,demy of
An
in
San Francisco, Cali[
He
ex-
pects
to
graduate
in December
2001.
I
Michael Seaman
took
part
in General
Electric's
18-month
Communications Leadership and
Development
Program. He
spent
his
first six months of training
in
Louisville,
Ky.
lJennifer
Siimmons
is pursing
a master's
in
library sci-
ence, specializing
in public
librarianship,
at SUNY
Albany. She
has
accepted a graduate
a.ssistant-
ship
there
as the Career Develop-
ment Center
librarian.
She
has
worked as a library clerk at the
Town of Ulster Public Lilbrary
in
Kingston, N.Y., for the
piist
eight
years and was awarded the
Public
Libraries Section Conference
Award from
the
New York Library
Association.
I
Jenny Sinrilus
is a
paralegal with the law firm Carman,
Callahan & Ingham
near
her home
in Long
Island
and plans to start
law school in
fall
2001.I
Helen M.
Stahlin
is
a seventh grade life sci-
ence
teacher
at Montgomery Middle
School.just outside
Princeton,
NJ
I
Janine
Szal
is living and working
in Finland as an editor of corporate
publications for Metsa Group Pub-
lications,
the third-largest
paper
company in Europe.
I
Rachel
Tollen
spent
the
summer of 2000
working for
the
president of
the
International
Commiuee of
Jews
from Arabland, pan of
the
Ameri-
can-Israeli
Public
Affairs Commit-
tee, and traveled
to
Israel to work
with
the
committee in Tel Aviv
during
recent
peace
initiatives.
She
is
enrolled
in
SUNY Stony Brook's
School of Social Welfare and ex-
pected
to
graduate in May
2001
with a master's
in
social work.
I
James Volpicello
isa
mutual
funds
specialist with Sun America Asset
Management
in New York, N.Y.
I
Michael Wilberton
has been
awarded an M.S. in finance
from
Brandeis
University. Michael
is
head
trader at Citizens Bank in
Providence, R.l.
t
Calling the
Class of 2001
Congratulations
on joining
the
alumni ranks! We want to
know what you'll be doing in
the coming year. Tell us
by
going
to www.marist.edu/alumni
(then click on "Alumni," then
click on "On-line
Updates,"
fill in your information
in the
spaces
provided and click on
"Submit")
or contact Sean
Morrison, alumni affairs director,
at sean.morrison@marist.edu.
While you're at the Marist alumni
Web site, don't forget to keep
your address
current
so we can
keep
you up
to
date on:

Homecoming/Reunion
2001,
coming up Oct.
26-28

Chapter activities

Career networking activities

Athletic
events

Social events

Volunteer service to Marist.
We want your news in the next
issue!
Keep
in touch.
SUM
~IE R 2 0 0 I
51

























The Legacy of Saint
Marcellin Charnpagnat
T:
e Marist campus
now
has a sculpture as
well
as a building honoring
Saint
Marcell
in
Champagnat, the founder of the
Marist
Brothers.
Life-sized bronze
sculptures depict two
Marist
students
speaking with
Father
ChampagnaL, for whom
a
campus
residence
hall
also is named. The statue commemorates
the arrival
of the Marist
Brothers in
Poughkeepsie
and their
purchase
of property for
their
school
in 1905. The sLatue, on what
is
called
Heritage
Plaza, midway between the
Seat of Wisdom
Chapel and
the
James A. Cannavino Library,
also celebrates
the
canonizaLion of Father
Champagnat in
Rome
on April 18, 1999
Private donations from
friends and
Marist
alumni
paid
for the artwork,
created by sculptor
Sr. Margaret Beaudeue. Bro. Paul Ambrose
52
M A R I
ST
M AG AZ
1
N E
Fontaine, FMS,
president
emeritus and a life
trustee
of the college, was
the driving
force
behind
its creation
and
funding.
The statue was dedicated in
June
2000
during ain assembly of some
165
Marist Broth-
ers on the Marist College campus.
The
three-
day
assembly
marked
the end of a year celebrat-
ing the
canonization and gave
the Brothers the
opportunity to celebrate
184
years of ministry
since Father Champagnat founded the order
in
1816.
Brothers Benito Arbues, superior general,
and LuisSobrado, councilor general, came from
Marist Brothers'
headquarters
in
Rome
to join
the American MarisLs
for the assembly. At the
opening; convocation, Marist College
President
Dennis Murray presented
Brother
Benito with
an
honorary
Doctor of
Humane
Letters degree
for
his
work on behalf of the less fortunate.

A statue of Saint Marc
was dedicated
during
a
assembly at Marist
Coll
The sculpture, by Sr. Mar
sits
between the
Seat
of Wisd
and
th'
l'ilP'fS
A
Ca1,JJ1avino
entepof the
campus.
Al N()WAKl'OH
LOCATtON
On
the
same weekend as the statue
dedica-
tion,
Marist
College
President Dennis Murray
(right)
and
Preside,1t
Emeritus
Bro. Paul
Ambrose
Fontaine,
FMS,
presented
Bro. Benito
Arbues,
FMS
(center), superior general
of tl,e
Ma,.-ist Brothers,
with
cm
honorary Doctor
of
Humane Letters degree
for
his
work
011
be-
half
of
the less fortunate
around
tlte world.










Marist's founders had a vision. So can you.
V
ISION.
Marist's founders had it, conceiving of a college
that 55
years
later
has educated 20,000 men and women
and prepared them for a
lifetime
of accomplishments.
You,
too, can create a plan that will shape the lives of
tomorrow's students.
By remembering
Marist in
your estate througlh a
bequest
or by
developing
a trust during
your
lifetime, you can found
a scholarship, establish an endowed professon.hip or faculty chair, maintain
Marist's
beautiful campus or support
academic facilities such as
Marist's
new
Hancock
Center
for
Emerging
Technologies.
Through your gift, you can honor
a loved one, a family member or your own achie'lements. Your financial advisor can explain the advantages of donating
assets such as cash, stocks or real estate to
Mar-ist
College.
Most important, your generosity will have a lasting impact on many lives.
What
you plan today will help provide the
best education possible for future generations of
Mari
st students.
And providing
for tomorrow is
what
vision
is
all about.
For information about plunned giving opportunities at Marist College,
please contact Shaileen Kcipec, Vice President for College Advancement,
(845) 575-346ll
or
Shaileen.Kopec@Marist.edu.















~IAlllST
Office of College Ad,,ancement
l'oughkt;e(b1e, Y
12601-1387
Class of 2001 Snapshots
Marist awanled
tr
rrcord I
,.JOO
undergraduate
and g1ad11atr
degrees
at
1h
55th Commencement,
held on the campus green.
Non-Profit Org
U, Postage
PAID
Millbrook
,
Pernrn :S:o ·13


front cover
inside cover
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pg 53
back cover