Skip to main content

MaristMagazine2013Spring

Media

Part of 1988 Fall

content

Fall 1988
M A G A Z
J
N
£
Vo/.J,No.J
IMARIST/IBM
JOINT STUDYI
Revolutionizing
the college environment
,?
A
firsthand
look at glasnost
On the c~tting edge:
~
the
Fashion Program at Marist
"--~-
·
· ·
--"""
The Marist Institute for Public Opinion
marks its 10th year



































Fall 1988
M A G
A Z
J
N E
Vol.I.No.I
2eurrent
What's happening
at and
around Marisc.
11
The Speakers Bureau
Look
who's
talking ac Marisc.
Features
14
:::;
ri:.:,;ng
The Marist lnsciruce for
Public Opinion
marks ics
10th anniversary.
By
jameJ K111/ander
17
Marist buildings
gee a face-lift;
new buildings planned.
Donnelly Hall
and Champagnac dormitory get a new
look.
Managing Editor
Jamer
Ku/lander
Executive Editor
Sman DeKrey
Art
Director
Richard
Deon
COVER
STORY
18
Revolutionizing
the
college
environment.
How
IBM and Marisc
College have
reamed up to combine advanced
technology and the liberal arts.
By Swan DeKrey
Contributor
Tim
Altonji
Janice
Box
Mercedes
M. Cardona
Ma11
Ellen Czerniak
Jennifer
Fragome11i
Valerie
Petrini
Hall
Maureen
Kilgour
Marianne T11ngate
2 2
Tho
op,n;ng of
,h,
Amoc;can m;nd.
Reflections on liberal arcs education.
By Marc
va11derHeyden
24
The Soviet
Union
observ d.
By Shai!een Kopec
Window Shopping
on
Red
Square
By
Alice
Provemen
26
~~::g:~~
the
Soviet
Union.
An
interview with
Dr.
Casimir Norkeliunas.
30
The cutting
dge.
The
Fashion
Program
ac Marist
moves ahead with cop designers.
33
Athome
abroad:
Life and rimes in the
Middle Kingdom.
By
Jcm1es
K1tlla11der
35
Commencement
1988
Vietnamese
boat person inspires Marisc
graduates.
3 8
Alumni Focus
Marist
graduate Paul X. Rinn,
'68,
commands
avy crew
and
ship
to
afecy.
39
Marist
People
A look at some new faces-and
some not so new faces-doing
new things.
4
?sports
The year
in
sports
reviewed.
Mari t Magazine
is published by Marisc ollege.
The magazine's address is Marist College,
Adrian Hall,
Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.
12601.
Telephone (914)
471-3240.
Copyright©
19
by Marist College.
Reproduction
in whole
or part without written permission
is
prohibited.
Third class postage paid at
ewburgh,
. Y.






































2
C
URRE
T
MariJt College
Pmident
Dermis
J.
M111ray
(second
from left) with
Harry
Reasone~·-
Dr. Frank S1amon,
president emeritm
of
CBS, and CBS This Morning
co-host
Kathleen S11/liva11
ca111e
to the
ceremony
to honor
!heir
colleague.
Sfllliva11 u1c1s
this
year's emcee.
·
Hany Reasoner
receives
1988 Lowell Thomas Award
"I
F
LOWELL
THOMAS
WERE
ALIVE TODAY, he
would be a
60 Minfltes correspondent,
maybe
the only one," said
Harry Reasoner,
referring ro
the energy and perseverance of
the late broadcaster.
Reasoner,
a co-founder and co-editor of
the successful news
magazine,
60 Minutes, made this comment
upon
receiving
this year's
Low-
ell Thomas
Award.
Reasoner
was cited by
Marist
President
Dennis
J.
Murray,
CB
President
Emeritus
Dr.
Frank
Stanton and
CB This
Morning co-host
Kathleen
Sulli-
van-who
was the
emcee for
the
award ceremony-for
hi
long
and distinguished career
in
broadcast journalism.
in
hand," said
Murray.
"His
writing speaks
to
the
point and it speaks with wit,"
said tanron.
"We
are the temporary
caretakers
(of broadcast jour-
nalism),
but you are our
lead-
ers," said Sullivan,
referring
co
the
role of veteran broadcasters
such as
Reasoner.
In his
speech,
Reasoner
wove
a story of fond memories, firm
beliefs and inspirational
reflec-
tions.
"60
Minutes has always
had the
idea
to
be responsible
and ro
tell
people
what they
need co know without putting
them
to sleep,"
he
said.
said, is due co how the program
treats a subject.
"We
don't do
issues," he
said. "We do
stories ... We cake a slice of the
pie
and
do
it
in
terms
of
people."
.......
Reasoner
was given a stand-
ing ovation by the audience of
some 200 people, including
Reasoner's
colleagues
Dan
Rather, Mike Wallace
and
60
MinNtes
Producer Don Hewitt.
The
Lowell
Thomas
A ward
is a miniature bronze bust of
the
lace Lowell
Thomas, who
was a native of
Pawling,
.
Y.,
and an honorary alumnus of
Marisr. The bust was sculpted
by
Phil Kraczkowski.
Marist
College created the award
in
1983
to
recognize
outstanding
lifetime
achievements of broad-
cast
journalists.
Reasoner's
career highlights
include serving as anchor of
ABC Evening
eu,s
for eight
years;
reporting
from
the White
House;
anchor of
numerous
Presidential
primaries and con-
ventions, and chief correspon-
dent in
Beijing
for coverage of
;
President Richard
ixon's
~
1972
trip
to
China,
for which

he
won an Emmy
A ,vard. Ho,v-
,.
>
C:
;,,
0
ever,
Reasoner is
perhaps best
known for
his role
in
60
Mi-
111,tes,
which began ics 20rh
season chis fall.
Previous
recipients of the
Lowell Thomas
A
ward are
David
Brinkley ( 1987), Doug-
las
Edwards (
1986),
Howard
K.
mith
(1985),
Walter
Cron-
kite
(1984) and Eric Sevareid
(
1983). The
annual award cere-
mony is
held
at the Helmsley
Palace
in
Manhattan.
:l:
>
C:
,.
"His keen sense of observa-
tion and
his
skillful writing
have
helped
60 Mi,wtes dem-
onstrate that good journalism
and good ratings can go hand
Earlier
in the
day
he met
privately with a small group of
Marist
communication arts
majors.
"A
good reporter
should go out on an assignment
as a
tabula rasa, a clean
slate,
to learn," he
told chem.
Much
of the success of
60
Minutes, he
.__
________________________
___.o
Marist
co11m11micatio11
?Ms
majors meet
with
Harry
Reasoner.
''A
good
reporter
should go out
on
a11
aJJignment
as a
tabula rasa.
a
dean
slate,
to learn," he told them.
MARI
T MAGAZINE•
FALL 198






































Janet Huber
receives 1988
Alumni
Achievement
Award
JA
ET HUBER,
das of
'82,
received
this
year's
Alumni
Achievement Award
at the
Lowell Thomas
A
ward cere-
mony.
Huber began
her career
in
1983
in
the Hudson
Valley
as
a reporter for the Taconic
ewspapers and
Local
Cable
ews in
Beacon. Since
that
time,
Huber has held positions
as
reporter,
editor and
producer
at several television stations
across the country.
Huber
worked
as assistant
assignment
editor for
ABC News in Los
Angeles, Calif.,
and as pro-
ducer and reporter at
W PB-
TV,
Morgantown, W.Va.
Huber now
works as a freelance
CUR
RENTS
Janet H11ber,
/mm
Robe,-f
class
of
'82.
,-eceive.r
1988
Alumni Achievemelll Au,a,-d
orman.
Marist
associate
profe.rsor
nf
co1111111111icatiom.
producer
and
writer for
the
midwestern
bureau of
ABC
ews
in Missouri.
Bur
with all
her
experience
with
local
and
network new
,
Huber's
first
love
is
documen-
taries.
In
1985,
she won
an
Emmy for
Convin
at
7
5, a
shore
documentary on noted CB
Radio
playwright, dramatist
and author,
orman Corwin.
he
continues ro work on
documentaries as an indepen-
dent producer.
While
at
Marisr
College,
Huber
interned as a video pro-
Marist Fund receives achievement award
MARIST COL
EGE'
MARIST
Fu
D
has
received
a Distin-
guished
Achievement Award
from
che
Council for the Ad-
vancement and Support
of
Education
(CASE) and
the
USX Foundation, Inc.
Marist was
one of
only four
colleges and
universities
nationwide to be recognized
for their overall
annual giving
programs. Award winners
were selecred for their excel-
lence in planning
and
man-
agement
in their development
programs.
Marist President Dennis].
Murray, Joan Gasparovic,
'83,
direccor of the Annual
Fund,
and
Thomas
onnors,
'70, alumni
representative
and a
major donor co the
1987
campaign, accepted the award
in July
at
the
A E Annual
MARIST MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988
Joa11 Gasparovir,
'83,
director
of
the
A111111al
F1111d.
receit•es
~,
1988
Distinguished Achievemmt
A wa,·d far
the 1987
Mc,,-ist
F11nd
from
Cyrus jollivette,
chair111a11
of
the 80t1rd
of
Tr11Jtee1
for the Co1111t'i!
fa,-
the
Advancemem and
S11ppon
of
Ed11catio11
(CA
E). ThomaJ
Co1111or.r,
70. of
Los
Angeles. represented
the A/11mni
Assodation
at
the
awards
ceremony.
Assembly in Anaheim, Calif.
In
addition co an engraved
award, Marist received
a
500
grant
from the U X Founda-
tion.
"This
prestigious
commen-
dation is
a
tribute to
all of our
volunteers
and
donors who so
generously
gave
of their time,
talents and
financial
resources
ducer for
the
IBM
Corporation
in Poughkeepsie.
This in-
ternship entailed producing,
writing, shooting and editing
in-house
video material. In
the
summer
of 1979, she worked
as a producrion assistant ac
WNET-TV in
ew
York. As
a cameraperson for numerous
programs, she worked for
the
Mac
eil/Lehre,·
Report
and
the
Dick
Cavet! Show.
Huber is
a cum laude
graduate of
Marist
College.
In
1985 she earned
her M.A.
degree
in
journalism at
the
University of Sou
chem Califor-
nia.
~
Among Huber's
ocher
~ achievements, she was awarded
::
>
C
"'
0
~
a
CB
Broadcasting
Fello,vship
as
Outstanding Incoming Jour-
nalism Student; first place from
the
arional
Federation
of
Pres Women
for a
broadcast
feature; and a Gold
Award from
the
acional
Association
of
Educational
Broadcasters
for a
special segment produced for
the
PB
Special
A111ei-ica11
Pop:
The Great ingers.
Huber resides
in St. Louis,
Mo., wich her husband Carl
wicord, a
producer
for
KETC-
TV, St.
Louis.
co support the Marisc Fund,"
said William
icklin,
a
Marist trustee
and
national
chairper on for
the 1987
cam-
paign.
"The alumni support
we
received for chis
campaign
was
phenomenal," said Dean
Gestal,
'7
I, the 1987 Marist
Fund
alumni chairperson.
'Tm
glad
to see chat
all ofour
alumni's
hard work and
com-
mitment were recognized
as
being
among
the best in the
country.
The
other
three institutions
that
were similarly recognized
were Williams College, Wil-
liamscown, Mass.; Ohio Stare
University, Columbus, Ohio;
and
Union College,
chenec-
cady,
N.Y.
A tocal of
28
educational
institutions, including second-
ary schools, two-year
junior
colleges and
four-year
com-
prehensive universities, were
acknowledged
by CA E
and
the USX Foundation in
1988.
3






















CURR
Freshmen 111QVing
in on opening day this fall.
In
the backgro1111d
is the
HNdson
River.
Marist seeking diversity
among
students
and faculty
THE
EW
A
ADEMIC YEAR
began September
6 at
Marist
College with 2,900 full-rime
undergraduates
who are
more
ethnically
and
culrurally mixed
and
who
come
from
a greater
variety of
states
rhan in previous
years.
The
19
new
faculty
members
also
have
a
more
diverse back-
ground
rhan
any orher previous
group of faculty
beginning rhe
academic year.
"The
freshman
class
is
a
more diverse group of people,"
said
Harry Wood, vice presi-
dent for admissions and enroll-
menr planning.
"There
is
a
greater
represenrarion from
minorities
and
from different
states and countries.
We're
proud that
Marisc
could attract
such a
wide
variety of scu-
denr
,"
he
said.
The
diversity in
Marist·s
srudenr body and faculty comes
at a
time when life in
every pare
of
the United Stares is
growing
more
geographically, racially
and ethnically
mixed. Gener-
ally colleges,
in
an attempt
to
mirror the racial
and ethnic
makeup
of
life
off campus, are
enrolling studenrs and
hiring
faculty
from many different
backgrounds, stares
and coun-
tries.
"In
rhis day
and age you
can't provide a solid
liberal
arcs
education
without diversity in
the
scudenr
body
and faculty,"
Wood said.
"Diversity
is,
r
chink, a good
and
healthy
aspect of an
under-
graduate education," said
Marc
vanderHeyden,
vice
president
I nderdip Khorana
(left), fi-oin
Japan,
and
Kweku
Atta
Rowe,
from
Ghana,
begin
their
freshman
yea,·
at Marin College.
Thewrrent
fi-eshman
class has a
greater
nlfntber
of students from foreign
coulltries
than ever before.
T
for academic affairs.
"I
chink
our
interests
in global educa-
tion
and
the
inrernacional di-
mension
of our core curriculum
are enhanced by
having
faculty
members
from a variety of
backgrounds.
It
widen
the
horizons
of
the
faculty and staff
and
help
open
up
our students'
eyes.
le
adds a certain richness."
J
use more
than 60 percent of
Marisc's student body
comes
from
ew
York Stare,
a drop
from
about 70 percent lase
year,
Wood
said.
This
year,
students
have
come
from
as far
away as
California
and Florida.
All
the
ew England states are
represenred
as well as several
states in
the mid-Arlantic re-
gion, such as
Maryland
and
Delaware, Wood
said.
Foreign graduate and under-
graduate
studenrs
are
from
Japan,
igeria,
Ghana,
Taiwan,
orway,
China,
Korea, France,
the
Dominican
Republic, che Philippines,
India, Zimbabwe
and
Panama.
The new
faculty
members
represent
a similarly diverse
background,
coming
from
California,
Oregon,
Ucah,
Texas, Illinois, Michigan,
and
ew
York-the
scare
and
the
city.
Marian Bohen,
a
visiting
assistant professor of
religious
studies,
just
returned in August
from
25 years of
living
in
In-
donesia.
ix
of
19 new
faculty
represenr minority
groups.
The
academic credentials of
the new
faculty are
distin-
guished,
vanderHeyden
noted.
Ofche 19 new members,
16 of
chem have
attained the
highest
degrees possible
in their fields,
he
said.
The
majority
of
chis
year's
freshmen have entered
into
one
of four programs: communica-
tion
arcs,
business, the social
sciences and computer
science,
Wood
said.
A
significant
number of freshmen-260
chis
year-have
not
decided upon a
major, he said.
In
face,
the
number
of freshmen entering
Marisc
without
having
selected
a major has increased
JOO
per-
cent in che past three years, he
aid. This is an encouraging
sign,
he noted.
"Because
Marisc
offers such
an extensive array of
programs,
students frequencly
identify
two
or
three
areas of interest,
bur begin college
in
an unde-
cided status," he said.
"They
cake courses in a variety of areas
their first
two
years
here,
and
then choo e the one chat's righc
for
chem. I don't know
of
another
undergraduate
college
char
approaches
che responsive
programming offered
by
Marist."
Another
encouraging
sign is
che consistent enrollment in
computer science ar
Marisc.
arionwide,
Wood
said, the
number of students enrolling as
computer science majors
has
decreased
25 percent the past
year.
"Our
statistics
exemplify
che quality of our computer
science program,"
Wood
said.
Although the
freshman
class
of 20 students is similar
in
number
co last
year's, che coral
number
of
undergraduates
has
increased by approximately
100 because
more students
are
deciding ro
scay
at
Marisr
for
their entire four-year
under-
graduate career,
Wood said.
Freshman
Ma,·kjones(right) from
Brooklyn. .Y, takes
a break during
opening
day with his mother. E1111ice
Lyte,
his father,
\f/i/liam
Jones
(center), and his brother,
\Vesley D011glas.
MARI
T MAGAZINE•
·ALL
1988



































C
URRE
York's
ratification of
the
U.S.
onscitution. The
regatta
was co-sponsored by
Marisc
with rhe Bicentennial
of che
Ratification
of
the
Conscicu-
cion
Advisory
Committee and
rhe Dutchess
County
Depart-
ment of Hisrory.
During
its
heyday,
as
many
as
half
a million people
lined
rhe shores of che
river
ro watch
che besc teams compete on the
noted
"Poughkeepsie
Course."
Jn 1895,
35
years
after the
regatta
began in
~
Poughkeepsie, the
firsr
inter-
~
collegiate
regatta
was
held,
~ with Columbia,
Cornell
and
~----------~~
the University of
Pennsyl-
Maris/ regalia
crew.
Marist hosts
historic
r~gatta
MARI
T
hosted
a hisroric re-
gatta during rhc summer
commemorating
the famous
Poughkeepsie Regatta run
on
the Hudson
River
from
1860
until
1949. Teams
represent-
ing
Marist
College, Columbia
University,
Princeton
Uni-
versity, the College of
Wil-
liam and
Mary,
Brown Uni-
vcrsicy
and
the Universicy of
Pennsylvania participated in
the
July
23,
1988 regacrn as
pare of the festivities celebrat-
ing the bicentennial of New
vania competing. Columbia
emerged as
the
winner of chat
race.
Special guests at the regatta
in
July were
four Columbia
alumni who
rowed
on
the
Columbia University varsity
crew in 1929,
winning
the
Poughkeep
ie
Regatta
rhar
year. In attendance were
Horace Davenport, class of
1929 and captain of the var-
sity crew;
William B.
San-
ford, class of
l
9 30;
Samuel
Walker,
class of
1929;
and
Henry Walter,
class of 1931.
The University of
Pennsyl-
vania woo
the 1988 Regatta
with a
rime
of 4:30 for the
l, 500 merer course.
1n
second
place was Columbia
Univer-
sity with a
rime
of :34.
In
third place
was Princeron
University with a time of
4:38
pecial guests were members
of the
1929
Colmllbia Univenity w1rsity
ffell'. From left, team c,ipt(lin
Horace Davenpo,·t;
William Sanford:
MariJt Executive Vice
President
Mark ,tl!ivan: a11111el
Wctlket·,
and
Henry
\'(I
alter.
MARIST MAGAZINE•
·ALL
1988
..,
~
"'
0,
-<
"'
~
TS
Marist computer campers
don't roast marshmallows,
or, ''During my summer
vacation I published
a newsletter''
IIIIIIIIII
~
-<
"'
L--~•=::::::~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!l•••------_J~
Janani
Umakanthan,
11,
a
student at
the Violet Aven11e
chool
in
Hyde
Park,
gets some
help from
co111p11ter
camp COflnselor
111a11
Hoeft,
a
Vassar College
student.
FIFTY-SEVEN
youngsters in
the Mid-Hudson region par-
ticipated
in
this
past
sum-
mer's computer
camp ac
Marisr.
The students,
aged
9 ro
17,
learned computer pro-
gramming
in
one of the com-
puter
languages
(LOGO,
BASIC
or
PA
CAL), and
practiced using various types
of software,
including
word
processing, spread sheer pro-
duction, computer graphics
and desk-cop publishing.
With
che desk-cop publish-
ing software,
the
students
produced a newsletter about
their
activities
during the
two-week camp session
.
The students
also
worked
with
Marisr's
two-fooc call
robot called
a
Hero
I. The
robot is
programmed through
a keyboard mounted on top
of ic.
Ir
can
be programmed
co sense light, movement
and
sound. Ir can
also
be pro-
grammed co speak.
Chad
Kobos,
13,
a stttdent al
the Po11ghkeepsie
Middle
chool,
shows off
his
comp11ter
graphic
work.
There also was instruction
on how to
convert
sheet music
inco
a
special code chat
com-
puters understand and
can
play back.
Marisr's
computer camp
is
organized by che
Marist
Col-
lege
School of Adult Educa-
tion.
5





























6
C
URRE
TS
Marist's medical technology program
receives national accreditation
THE
MEDI
AL
TECH
0LOGY
PROGRAM
at
Marist
College
has
been awarded a full five-
year accreditation by the
Committee
on
Allied Health
Education and
Accreditation.
"This
accreditation
pub-
licly identifies
our program as
meeting nationally
estab-
lished
standards of educa-
tional quality
and makes
~
Marisr
medical technology
;: graduates
more
marketable,"
~
said
Catherine
ewkirk, di-
~
rector
of
Marisc's medical
:;:
c:;
technology
program.
Medical technology
is a
four-year
undergraduate
Bachelor
of cience program
with
studies
in
hematology,
clinical chemisrry, microbiol-
ogy and immunohematology.
The
program
includes
a
six-
month
clinical
rotation, dur-
ing
which
students
work in
medical
laboratories at
t.
Francis Hospital, Hospira!
hared ervices
Inc.,
or the
Ci ry
of
Ki ngsron Laboratory.
Each student
is
guaranteed a
clinical
rotation
in
his or her
senior year. The
student may
continue
to
reside
on campus
Students earn tuition and experience
through community service
THROUGH A, I
0VATIVE
MARIST PROGRAM, tudents
can earn tuition credit in
return for providing services
to
nonprofit community or-
ganizations.
The
ommunity
ervice
Project, funded by the U.S.
Department of Education,
wa developed to help sru-
dents defray the cost of their
college
education
while
giv-
ing chem an opportunity
to
learn how their academic
skills and interests can be
applied to help resolve prob-
lems confronting the commu-
nity.
The project's first commu-
nity service placements
started last January with
12
students working in the
Poughkeepsie public schools.
These students, serving as
teachers' aide and education
assistants,
provided an aver-
age of 10 hours of service per
week throughout the spring
semester. At the end of the
semester
each
received 500
in tuition credit.
According to Philip
Koshkin, coordinator of the
Community Service Project,
Michele Mollo/a, a
10pho111ore
accoftnting major,
Jhari11g
a lighter
1110111ent
with a
Jt11de11t
at the \'(l,m·i11g
Si-hoof
in Poughkeepsie.
the public school system was
selected as the program's ini-
tial service sire because
of
irs
need for
assistance
in provid-
ing classroom-related ac-
tivities, especially in the
elementary schools.
"Although
Dutchess
County as a whole is quite
affluent,
the City of
Poughkeepsie itself has a high
proportion of socially and
economically
disadvantaged
persons,"" Koshkin said.
"The
public schools here are faced,
in microc sm, with many
of
the economic and racial prob-
lems
confronting
major urban
school systems across the
country. More than
20
per-
cent
of che families in che
district live below the poverty
line,·• he said.
"More and
more, the
schools
are
being called upon
to
provide individual
atten-
tion and support ... to under-
privileged children," Koshkin
said. The
12
Marisc students
were placed with the schools
to help provide additional
opporcuniries for such special
attention and direction.
Ten of the
12
students are
pursuing maiors in manage-
ment studies, communica-
and
is
supervi ed
by
a faculty
member
during the rotation.
As
a
result
of
this
accredita-
tion,
graduates of
the medical
technology program ac
Marisr
are eligible
co rake
a arional
Certification Examination,
sponsored
by
the American
ociety of
linical Pathol-
ogists.
Graduates
are
qual-
ified to
work in
several areas,
including
hospitals,
private
labs,
che
pharmaceutical and
medical produces
industry,
governmental agencies, col-
lege
and
universities.
cions and
computer
science.
The program has empha ized
recruitment of students from
these
areas
of study because
they
are
not generally oriented
toward
careers
in human ser-
vice fields.
Often students in the
human services
already
have
che opportunity co develop a
familiarity with community
needs and goals. The program
gives students in ocher fields
a similar opportunity.
Koshkin said chat through
the Community
ervice
Proj-
ect, Marisr ha reach dour in
a partnership
to
the commu-
nity, with everyone involved
benefiting.
"The
students
receive a broader-ba ed and
more practical learning ex-
perience, the community and
its citizens receive much
needed assistance, and Marist
is
able
to
reaffirm and expand
irs foundations as
a
I ibcral
arcs
institution,"
he said.
A coral of 60 placements
has been proposed for this
academic year. These place-
ments will encompass not
only Poughkeepsie schools,
but also local agencies serving
senior citizens, disabled
per-
sons, rhe homeless and ocher
groups in need of support
servJCes.
MARIST MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988




























Marist
establishes
scholarships
for adult
students
MARI
T
0LLEGE has estab-
lished
the
Harold
and Anne
Miller Scholarships for Adule
Students. The scholarships
have been funded with a gift
from Poughkeepsie residents,
Harold and Anne Miller.
Harold Miller, a native of
Poughkeepsie and a benefac-
tor of the college, is a profes-
sional engineer who has man-
aged and built diversified
real
es rare developments rhrough-
ou t the
Hudson Valley.
The
men and women who
are
registered
through
Maris r's School of Adult Edu-
cation make up nearly 25
percent of
Marisr·s
under-
graduate enrollment, and
are
often pare-rime srudents who
must
meet
the demands of
both
their families and their
jobs.
Many
are in
need
of
some financial aid, but most
aid programs are
restricted
co
full-rime Students. Through
this
scholarship and a com-
prehensive, flexible
schedule
of classes,
Marisr is
meeting
the special needs of
nonrradi-
rional
students who are
look-
ing for job advancement,
new
careers and personal growth.
MARIST
MA
AZI E

FALL
1988
C
URRE
T
lleidi Klein,
/llarist computer
science
ll1c1jor
and
d,m
of
1988
,,,i/edir-
torian,
helping one of
150
gifted and
talented
frfth-?,radm
at the
··ch,i/leuges
for
Problem
ofren·· session at
/llarist.
St11dents
gather
ill
Dom,elly Hall
before begi11ni11g
their
dcq
in
·•problem
solving··
ll'Ork.Jhops.
''Gifted
and talented''
youngsters
come
to Mari
st for a day
THE FOURTH
annual
visit
of
fifth-graders from
gifted and
talented
programs
in
schools
across
Dutchess
ounty last
March brought 150 students
to
Marisr for the
one-day
event entitled
"Challenges
for
Problem
olvers,"
which fea-
tured
everal special
workshop
sessions.
The workshops,
co-spon-
sored
by Marisr College
and
the
Dutchess County BO E
(Board of ooperative duca-
tional
ervi e )
Resource
Center
for
Gifted Education,
were:
"Thinking
On Your
Feet" by James
pringston,
Mari t
as
i rant
profe
sor
of
communication ans and
de-
bate
team coach; "Broadcast
ews"
by Dougla Cole,
Marist inscrucror
of com-
munications;
"How
To Be
Your Own Best Friend" by
Edward O'Keefe, Marisr pro-
fessor
of
p
ychology; ·· om-
purer Graphics" by Heidi
Klein, Marist
computer sci-
ence
major
and
class
of
1988
valedictorian;
"Art
from the
Heart" by artist Erica Sher;
"Weaving
on
a
Straw Loom"
by artist Deborah Siktberg;
"Genetics•·
by Jacques
Chaput,
a
reacher
at
Ar-
lington
Elementary
School;
"Creative
Problem
olving"
by Lynn Gold,
gifted program
teacher
at
Pawling
lemen-
rary
School,
and " ew
Games" by Eileen Tobin,
Ketcham High School physi-
cal education
teacher.
According
to
Ro
e
Barer,
student specialist with the
BOCE Resource Center
for
Gifted Education,
"The
pur-
poses
of
the
program
are to
expose
tudenrs
to
experts
in
specific
fields,
to
give
them
an opportunity
to
work
cooperatively
with students
from ocher districts who have
similar interests, to
exercise
their problem- olving skills
and
to
have fun ...
cudents from school dis-
criers in Arlingron, Beacon,
Dover, Millbrook, Pawling,
Pine Plains, Red Hook,
pac-
kenkill
and
Webutuck par-
ticipated.
Local leaders honored at
21st Community
Breakfast
MARI
T
OLLEGE
PRE IDENT
Dennis J. Murray presented
President's Awards
at
Marist's
21st annual
Community
Breakfast last
fall.
Award
winners are
(from
left to right)
Rabbi Erwin Zimet,
spiritual
leader
of
Poughkeepsie's
Temple Beth-El since
1946;
Thomas
. Aposporos, mayor
of
Poughkeepsie from
1980
to
l
987;
and John E. Mack,
Ill, presidenrand
chief execu-
tive officer
of entral
Hudson
Gas
&
Electric Corp. The
three honorees were
cited
by
Murray
for
their
ourscanding
contributions
to
improving
the
quality oflife
in the Mid-
Hudson region.
:,:
0
!i
>
"'
0
0
"'
~
7






















8
C
URRE
Marist's new degree
program
in
Computer
Information Systems one
of few
in
nation
THE
E\XI YORK TATE
De-
partment of Education has
approved Marist
ollege's
new
undergraduate
program
in
omputer
lnformacion
yscem (CI ).
According ro Onkar
Sharma, chairperson of the
computer science and math
division, Marist is the only
college in the
region,
and one
of only a few schools nation-
wide, ro offer an under-
graduate CIS program.
As
an
academic discipline, CIS
is
less
than a decade old and
serves as a
bridge
berween
computer science and busi-
ness.
"Traditional
under-
graduate computer science
and business curricula have
not addressed the issue of
business applications of
com-
puter technology," Sharma
said. "The Marist program
features a curriculum that
synthesizes the best of both
worlds.
In
developing the ClS
curriculum, we followed the
recommendations of the
As-
sociation for Computing
Machinery and the
Dara Pro-
cessing
Management
Associa-
tion, organizations which
represent computer science
professionals, practitioners
and educators,"' he said.
The
I curriculum is a
program that emphasizes
computer applications in in-
stitutional and business envi-
ronments.
le is technically
oriented, srressi ng pro-
gramming and systems de-
velopment skills, along with
information systems and busi-
ness
knowledge.
lt entails the
study of ystems analysis,
systems design and computer
programming, as well as the
technical skills and business
issues that are pertinent co the
development, implementa-
tion and maintenance of infor-
mation systems in a variety of
organizational settings.
The new program differs
from Marisr's established and
highly
regarded
computer
science curriculum in some
important ways. The com-
puter science curriculum
is
theoretical and mathemati-
cally oriented, with an em-
phasis on alg
rithm
design,
development and
resting,
and
software and hardware
technology. CI is an applied
program which
tres
es infor-
mation systems concepts,
organizational functions, as
well as computer technology.
"There
is
a
vigorous need
for people who can go beyond
technology and solve business
problems through a systems
perspective. Marist CI
graduates will be prepared co
fill this need, able co assume
entry level positions as busi-
ness applications program-
mers, systems analysts, sys-
tems designers and communi-
cation network analyses,"
according co
Jerry McBride,
associate professor of com-
puter science and director of
Marisr's Information Systems
Graduate
Program.
Graduates of
the
program
will hold a
Bachelor
of ciencc
degree in computer informa-
tion systems and will
have
uccessfully
completed 120
undergraduate credits. More
than
halfof
the
required
cred-
its will be earned in business
and computer courses.
T
Upward Bo11nd
st/dents
teaming
co111p11te,•
graphics
as
part
of the
enrichment co11rses
offered
in this
year's
program. Seated
(from
left)
are Cynthia
Sa11de1·s,
Blanca Ramirez
and
Cyril
Coefield.
tanding,
(from
left),
are
Sean Borkine, Danielle H11111phrey
and
Monique
Morales.
Upward
Bound
enriches and
motivates
students
THE
ATI0
·s
oldest feder-
ally
funded
education
pro-
gram,
Upward Bound,
joined
with Marist this past summer
forche 22nd year.
Ir is
one
of
the
longest
partnerships with
a college
chat Upward Bound
has had.
This
year,
120 low income
and
"first
generation"
youths-youths
from
families
with no immediate relative
who has
a college
degree-
parcici paced in the programs
at
Marisr,
according
to
Joseph
Parker, Marist's
Upward
Bound direcror.
In
the Upward Bound
program, high school
stu-
dents from
14
to
19
years old
are given
in crucrion in
col-
lege preparatory
courses, gen-
eral
enrichment courses and
in high school
courses
that
students need co repeat for
credit.
The
program
helps
students graduate
high
school
and
motivates them co
go co
college, a
university
or a
pro-
fessional
school, Parker said.
The he!
p provided by
p-
ward Bound, however,
often
extends
beyond the individual
student, Parker said.
"You
have
a
ripple
effect,"
he
aid.
"There's
no celling how many
people-parents
of srudenrs
or
their friends
or
neigh-
bors-who
have been
af-
fected.
Some parents decide
to go
back to
college afrer
seeing the
change
in their
children."
This year's program drew
students
from
15 area school
districts for courses
caught by
Marisc faculty
and
tea her
from
other area colleges and
high
schools,
Parker
said.
Funds for the program-
390,000
for
the 1988/89
school year-are
provided by
the U.S. DeparrmentofEdu-
cation.
The nation's
education
department began
Upward
Bound in 1965
with a
pilot
program
at
selected
colleges
and universities
in the
nited
Stares. A year lacer, in the
summer
of
1966, Marist Col-
lege began
co
participate in
the
program.
Since then,
Marisr's Upward Bound pro-
gram
has helped
an estimated
3,300
students, Parker said.
"'
-<
~
MARI
T
AGAZI
E

FALL 1988










































C
URRE
T
Marist
Children's
Theater
grows up
BEING
BALD
and orange
might not be too appealing to
most, but Bruna Pancheri
didn't mind.
Pancheri, a communica-
tions major from Elizaville,
N.Y., played the part of an
Oompa
Loom
pa in
the
Marist
College Children·s Theater
production
last
spring of
Willie Wo11kaa11d
theChowlate
Factory, one of the rheater"s
most successful runs. The
play, performed at Marisr,
was seen by
3,400
students
from more
than
50
elementary
schools throughout the Hud-
son Valley.
"It
really doesn't matter
what part you play as long as
you get
co
be someone,"
Pan-
cheri said.
"The
time and
effort you put int it makes
whatever you do worthwhile.·•
The Children's Theater is
pare of
the
Marist College
Council of Theatre Arcs,
which, although appearing
under different name since
the Marist Brothers began
performing on major holidays
and feast days in
1946,
is
Marist's
oldest student or-
ganization.
The first children's theater
production,
Cinderella, was
presented
in
1969,
the season
in which Gerard Cox, vice
president for student affairs,
direcced hi first produccion
for the college's cheater or-
ganization.
ow, he
and
Betty
Yeaglin, direccor of
college activities, serve as
advisors
of the council. Some
of the other past productions
of
the
children's theater in-
clude
nou• White, The
\Vizard
of
Oz, and Pettr
Pan.
"Playing
Peter Pan (in
1986)
was my most memora-
ble experience with the thea-
ter
group here at
Marist,"
said
Peter
Prucnel,
former presi-
dent of the council's executive
board.
The children's produce ions
can be rime-consuming; they
are
the
only performances
directed entirely by scudents,
and
each
production has a run
of
15
performances.
"'The
week before an actual
show we have rehearsals from
7
p.m.
co
2
a.m. every night,
including rehearsals on the
weekends," said Lisa Meo of
Catskill,
.Y.
"One
night
before the show
(Willie
Wonk,,) we were up until
4:30
a. m. putting the finishing
couches on che set. ..
The effort, however, seems
ro
have
its own special reward.
Said Chrissy Lawless, a com-
munications major from Hun-
tington,
.
Y.,
and this year's
theater
council
president,
"
eeing a smile on a child's
face makes it
all
worthwhile."
6
,,
;;I
.__ _____________________
....1:0
J\
scene
from Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.
011e
of
the Chi!dren"s Theater··.r
most
s11ccmf,il
runs.
MARIST MAGAZI
E

··ALL
1988
ill
;;l
"'
"'
-L.....!111...1..l..Ll--
........
-"-.',l!.-"''-----L_-__JL;,.
_____
__J~
St11dents
from the
Maris!
College
S111w11er
cholrm
Program
record
a
s011g
which they llirote
for
the
opening of
their
video
dommentary
011
Dutchess County
i11
the
year
2000.
It's the year 2000; do you
know what life will be like?
FORTY
GIFTED HIGHS
H
L
STUDENT
from
Dutchess
County
in
New York had
the
opporrunicy during the
um-
mer to look ahead
to
what
life
might be
like in
the
year
2000.
The
students in
the
Dutchess County Regional
High
School of Excellence
Summer
Scholars
Program
produced three video
documentaries during their
two-week stay
on
the Marist
campus
in July.
Marist's Director
of
Jour-
nalism David McCraw,
coor-
dinaror
of the
um mer
chol-
ars
program
on campus, de-
scribed the program
as a
unique
opportunity for gifted
students co interact with peers
from
ocher schools.
1n
addi-
tion,
the specific topic
of
'"Dutchess
2000:
Documen-
taries of the Future"
gave
students the
chance to learn
more
about
the
county's
past
and present,
co
think
crea-
tively about the
future,
and
develop
media
skills,
includ-
ing script writing, video
pro-
duction
and editing.
The
topics
for
the three
documen-
taries were:
"'Living and
Learning:
Education
in the
Year
2000,"
"'Habitat:
Hous-
ing
and
Architecture
in
the
Year
2000,"
and "Land and a
River: The
Future of
Dutchess
County's
Environment."
Marist
was one
of
four
Dutchess County
colleges
that participated in the
1988
program.
The High
chool of
Excellence
is
a
consortium of
the county's
school districts
and
Marist, Dutchess Com-
munity
ollege,
Vassar
ol-
lege
and Bard College. The
program
operates under the
auspices of
the Dutchess
County Board
of
Cooperative
Educational Services (BOCES).
McCraw
said that one of
the highlights
of
the
two
weeks
was a chance encounter
that students from the Mari st
program
had with
a group of
high school students from the
oviet Union.
"One
of
my
colleagues overheard a student
in the
program saying
chat
the
exchange
had
changed
his
entire
view
of
the
oviet
Union,"
McCraw said.
Learning
about each other
and being pare of a group
working on
a
joint
project
was
an
important
part of
the
summer
program. Gary Stel-
laro,
an Arlington High
School student who worked
on
the housing
documentary,
said
that when he first heard
of
the program, he
expected
it co
be
"full
of kids
with
pocket protectors
and
horn-
rimmed
glas es."
"Ir
wasn't like that
at all,"'
he
told
the Taconic newspa-
pers in
an
interview
about
the
program.
The
teams,
he said,
became
like
a
family.
"Ifihad
to
sum the whole thing up
in
one
word,"
tellato
said,
"it
wouldn't
be
'smart'
or
'documenrary.'
Ir
would be
'comradery.
· ..
9












































JO
C
URRE
T
Talking your way to the top
FOUR YEARS AGO Marisr had
n debate
team.
ow its
team
is
one of
the
very best in the
country.
The Marisr
ream,
now
in
i rs
fourth year,
had ics
best
season
during
1987-88.
Last
spring, the
team
traveled
ro
Colorado
prings ro compete
in
the
ross
Examination
Debate Association
(
DA)
National Tournament. At the
rournament the varsity
ream,
made up
of team captain
Mike
Buckley
and
Tony Capozzolo,
placed ninth
out of approxi-
mately
240
teams. Junior
varsity, also
made up
of
Buck-
ley and
apozzolo,
placed
fifth.
Vene
a odorniu and
Tom
esbitt of
the novice
team
placed third.
Out
of
rhe
400 chools
in
CEDA, Marist finished in
ninth place
overall.
They
were the only
school
in the
country
co rank
in the top
10
in
all
threedivisions: novice,
junior varsity and varsity.
Throughout
the
year
they
ranked
as
high
as
third in the
nation
and
have nor
fallen
more than
seven positions
behind the leading
chool.
Jame Spring ton,
a
istant
professor of
communication
arts and
director
of
debate
ac
Marisr, has been with
the
program
ince the fall of
1985.
pringscon
acrribures
the ream's rise
in
racu
ro
long
hours
of
hard work.
" one of
rhe
ocher chools
pur in nearly
as
many hours
as
we do. We practice 12
co
15
hours
a
week
and
travel
for
three
day
co the
meets,
so
I
see
the
ream seven
day
a
week," Springston
aid.
Marist has beaten such
competitive
chools as or-
nell, Dartmouth,
and
Duke.
Springsron
comments
char
bearing the
big
school is
highly unusual.
"It
says a
lot
for the
administration
and the
student
body,"
he said.
ach school
in EDA hoses
a rnurnament once each ea-
son.
At the Marist rnurna-
ment this
year,
Marist placed
third,
behind
I
orthern
Il-
linoi
and
West Point.
Springston isn't
the only
one
who"s proud
of the ream'
success. Buckley,
a
junior, is
one of
the
best debater in
rhe
country.
He's beaten
all of
the
seniors in the northea rem
schools. He' won more than
0 trophies
and an award for
gening
rhe most
speaker
poinrs
in a
pair
of
Bosron
rournaments. Buckley had
predicted
earlier in
the
year
chat che ream would finish in
"
:i:
""0
___
,___
~
r
J·,
;:i
-,;....;;;.:.~.:.Jlt.~..,::,U.'-'--'"--"""-----=-::a...:---'-L__u:,"""""'"'"'--'-----'"'
/\larist
u·as the only debate team in the
C0//1111}
to finish i11
the
top
ten in all
three
divisiom----1'arJity.
j1111im·
varJity and 11ovice.
Pia11red
here ll'ith
011/y
WIiie
of
their
I 987-88
seaJ011
trophies
are
(J,-0111
left)
Marist debate
coach
James Springrton: team
cap1ai11
Mike
BNckley:
MariJt President
DeimiJ
M11rmy. rmd
teamrap1ai11
To11J
Capnzzolo.
the
top lO.
Springsron
said on
Buck-
ley·s
success,
"!e's
mac.le
all
the difference. All the
coaches
hope
and
pray
co find
the
one
kid
who will
be
the nucleus
of
rhe ream. Mike is rhac kid.
He's
got
dedication,
en-
thusiasm
and sacrifice."
Although Buckley
i consid-
ered
to
be the nucleus, the
ream would not
be
where
ic
is
without Capozzolo. Buck-
ley
said,
"I
re,1lly
chink
Tony's
the besc novice in the
country.
He
competes on
JV
and var-
sity
level."
A
a fre
hman lase
year,
Capozzolo
aid
be
felt
pres-
sured at fir
t,
" ... but as
I
moved
up I realized
it
wasn
·c
so bad."
Told
of
his ceam-
mace's praise
of
him, he re-
ponded, "Personally,
I
don't
know. l likcroremainaliccle
humble. l"ve met
some pretty
good
novices."
How
does
pringscon
moci-
vace
the ceam for
debates?
"I
don'r
have ro
give
rhem
a
pep
ralk,"
he
said. "I
have
co calm
chem down.
Mike
and
Tony
will
scay
up
all
night
before
a
debate.
r
have
to
cell
rhern
co
get some
rest
or
they'll
burn themselves our."
Cadden Faculty Reading Room dedicated
the funds have been allocated
for faculcy sci pends, books,
software and supplies.
Plans
are
underway
ro
begin
a lec-
ture series in
rhe
spring of
1989
involving experts in che
field of computer science.
FACULTY
wishing co
research
computer-related
subjects
now
have their
own
tudy
room and
library
in
the Lowell
Thomas
ommunicacions
:i:
Center.
~
Valerie
adden, wifeofrhe
~
lace Marist
professor of com-
g
purer cience,
William).
~
Cadden, donated her
hus-
-----=,...,,....,_....._
........
__
___.L...J
:i:
band's
library
of computer
Vale,·ie Cadden, along u•ith her childm1
science and
math books
ro
Gayle and Bill, poJe by a photo of the
Marist. The
books are now
late
Dr.
William
J.
Cadden. u•ho
available in the
adden Fac-
Jerved aJ a profwor of
computer
science
ulcy
Reading Room, which
and fo1111ded
the oflware Engi11eeri11g
was dedicared
May
7. Taking
Research
Fund
al
Mr1riJt.
part
in the
dedication were
Mrs.
Cadden and
her
family;
Marist President Dennis
J.
Murray; Marc
vanderHeyden,
vice president for academic
affairs;John MacDonald, pro-
fes orof computer science; and
Onkar
harma, chairper on of
the
Division
of Computer
cience and Mathematics.
Cadden,
a
longtime
em-
ployee of
IBM,
established
che Software
Engineering
Research
Fund with a
major
gift
in
ovember of
1985.
The
fund supports faculty
research in
various areas of
computer science.
At
present,
Ar
che close of the
1987-88
fiscal year, a
coral
of 44,740
had
been
received
for the
research fund.
This
coral
in-
cludes major gifts from
Dr.
and
Mrs.
Cadden and
IBM
marching gifrs.
After
retiring from
IBM,
adden joined
th Marisc
faculty in
1984
as the
recip-
ient of the Linus Foy Chair
10
ompucer
cience, which
he
h Id until his death in
December
1986.
MARIST MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988



























s
PEAKER
S
B
REAU
Back
in
the U.S.S.R.: Thomas Watson, Jr.
at Marist
recounts
a Siberian
odyssey
Thomi:u
J.
\'(I
atJon,
Jr.
retraces
his 1987 ret1trn to Siberia.
THOMAS].
WAT
ON,
JR.,
chairman emeritus of
IBM
and former United
races
Ambassador to
the
Soviet
Union,
recounted
some of
the
highlights
of
his
experiences
in the Soviet
nion
in a pre-
sentation at
Marisc College
lase spring.
In
1942,asacapcaininche
U.S.
Army Air Force
and
co-pilot of a
B-24
Liberator,
Warson
was an integral part
of the ream
chat
opened the
Alaska- iberia
(AL-
IB)
air
ferry
route. The AL-SIB route
was extremely
important to
the
Allied
war effort as the
route
for
delivery
of 8,000
U.S. aircraft co
the Soviet
Union between
1942 and
1945.
In July
of
l987, Warson
retraced
the
AL-SIB route in
a flight
that
commemorated
the 1942 trip.
Warson piloted
his
own plane----.i
cwin-
engine, eighc-seat
Gares Lear-
jet 55-from
New York
to
the U
.S.S.R., flying
across
iberia
and
Alaska. Watson
and
his pa
sengers were
the
first
Westerners co make
a
private flight
ch
rough
Siberia
co
Alaska. The itinerary
in-
cluded
Moscow,
Novosibirsk,
Yakutsk
and
Anadyr.
MARI T MAGAZINE•
FALL 1988
After
flying for
the
U.S.
Army Air
Force during
World
War II, Wat
on
returned
co
che IBM Corporation, becom-
ing president in 1952, chief
executive officer
in 1956,
and
chairman in 1961.
In 1971,
he was named
chairman of
the
Executive
Committee
and
became
chairman emeritus
in
1981.
After his retirement
from
IBM, he was named by Pres-
ident Jimmy Career
as chair-
man
of the
General Advisory
Committee
on
Arms
Control
and
Disarmament in
1978,
and
the
following year,
Pres-
ident
Carter appointed
him
to
the pose
of
. .
Ambassador
to
the Soviet
Union, a
posi-
tion
he held until 1981.
During his
presentation ar
Marisc, Watson
shared anec-
dotes
and insights
regarding
his work
and
travel
over
the
years
in the Soviet Union.
From
his
50-year association
with the
country,
Watson has
come away with a
respect
and
understanding
for
the
oviet
way oflife that
few Americans
have.
"If
you opened
rhe (
oviet]
borders,
there
would
nor be
a
huge
exodus,"
he said.
What the oviet Union
needs,
Wat
on said, is strong
leadership-strong
enough
to
change a
nation's
chinking,
from the
people at
the
cop on
down.
"If
Mikhail Gorbachev
is
able
to
pull chat country
into
the modern world
...
ro
begin
co
have real
competition
within
rheir own country and
rhe
world, he
will be the
greatest
Russian
co
have lived
in
a thousand year , "
Warson
said.
Writer Nikki
Giovanni is
keynoter
THE NOTED writer, poet,
journalist and recording artist
ikki Giovanni was the key-
note speaker of the Black
History Month Celebration at
Marisc last February.
Giovanni spoke about her
experiences as a poet
and
how
the
1960's civil
rights
move-
ment has affecced her work.
She has written many books,
including,
Black Feeling Black
Talk,
ightComesSoftly, Black
Judgment
and
The \'(lomt11
and
theMm. Sheisalsoanedicorial
con ultant
co
Encore America11
and
a
columnist for
Worldwide
eu
1
s
magazine. Her column,
"One
Woman'
Voice," is
syndicated by the Anderson-
Moberg Syndicate of
The
ew
York Times.
ez,•s
correspondent
and Marist College
gmd11ate
Bill O'Reilly
(right) speaks
u•ith
a s111dem
am/
Marist Associate
Professo,-
of
History
Peter O'Keefe during
a recelll
1
1
isit to Marist. O'Reilly,
'71. spoke
011
a mriety of
topic,.
ind11ding
televisirm
neu's
product
io11.
mccess
a11d
Marist College.
11


























12
s
PEAKERS
BUREAU
The
Rev. Peter
J.
Hem·iot
Noted theologians offer divergent
views on wealth and poverty
HERE
I
A CONCEPT: Effi-
ciency
a11cl
equity.
"
an we be efficient as an
economy and equirable as an
economy?" asked
the
Rev.
Peter J. Henrioc.
"
,od
is
nor
an egalitarian.
He
made each one of us differ-
ent," said
lay
theologian and
social critic Michael
ovak.
Henrioc, director of
the
Center of oncern in
Washington,
D
..
,
and
Novak, director of Social and
Political
rudies at the
Amer-
ican Enterprise
Institute
for
Public Policy Research in
Washington,
D.C.,
came
co
Marisr
to debate the issue of
equity and efficiency in the
U.S. economy.
The
presentation, entitled
"Equity and Efficiency:
Com-
mentary
on
The
atholic
Bishops' Pasroral Letter
on
the Economy,"was sponsored
by the Division
of
Manage-
ment
tudie
and the
Cun-
neen-Hackett Lecture
erie ,
and was organized by
Jack
Kelly,
division chairperson,
and
John Griffin,
as ociare
professor of economics. Eileen
Taylor-Appleby,
assistant
professor
of social
work,
and
urris
adorette, assistant
professor
of
religiou
studies,
participated
in
a
discussion
that followed
Henriot's
and
ovak's presencarions.
To Henriot,
the problem
of poverty is a problem
in
the
economic system. To
ovak,
poverty i a problem of indi-
vidual attitudes.
Henrior
called for changes
in
public
policy
that
are instilled with
a
moral
vision to help
the
poor.
ovak said individual
initiative
alone will lift people
out of
poverty.
"L
s
-wealth
created
in
such a fashion that,
in
its
creation,
it
can
be nwre
eq_ually
distributed?"
Here
are some facts cited
by
Henriot: More
than
35
million Americans,
or
15
percent
of
the population,
are
poor
and living belo,v the
poverty
line. There
arc some
20 million
to
O
million hun-
gry people
in
the United
races.
Among
all the indus-
trialized nations, the United
Stare has the
widest gap
between the
rich
and
the
poor.
Roughly
28
percent of
the
nation's wealth
is held by
2
percent
of
che
population.
The borrom
20 percent ofrhe
population
received
4. 7
per-
cent of the gross income
earned by
the
nation's people.
Poverty
is increasing in the
niredStates, notdecrca
ing.
The cau es
for
this apparent
backslide
in the
country's
economic evolution
are many
and, in the eyes of
Henriot
and
ovak, disparate.
"Is wealth created
in
such
a fashion
that, in its
creation,
it
can
be
more equal
I
y
cl
istri-
buted ?"
Henriot
asked. "Par-
ticipation
in the
creation of
wealth is the
central
question
in
the Pascoral Letter. The
letter is about participation,
not
the
receiving of the fruit
of
the
economy."
aid
ovak, "The virtue of
enterprise
needs
to be trained,
like anything else.
One
needs
to
see opportunities to fill
a
need
where others
don't.
Poverty has nothing
co
do
with
the
economy but with
social
behavior." He
made
three
strong
recommenda-
tions
for individuals
co
avoid
poverty:
l.)
Complete
high
school;
2.)
Work
at any job,
even for minimum wage,
and; 3.)
Ger married
and stay
married.
Once you've done
this,
he
said,
"your
chances of
ever being poor
are
extremely
low."
The
welfare system
that
began in rhe
nired cares in
the 1960's helped
the
old,
Novak
said, but
created
for
the young a social situation
that
encouraged
"the
maximi-
zation of irresponsibility."
lt
left
people
in
a position in
which marriage was
no
longer
necessary for economic survi-
val, as it
had been in the
past
to
a
great extent,
he
explained
And,
by forsaking
marriage, the maturity and
responsibility that
come with
family
life
were
delayed, if
not
sidestepped altogether,
he
said.
We
are seeing
the
out-
growth of chis condition in
the
nation'
homeless,
ovak
said.
In the past, we
lived
with relatives if needed.
"Today,"
he
said,
"relatives
don't cake care of their own.
This
disturbs me."
ovak
maintained
char
America is
the
"most
just
society in the world" for al-
lowing
practically unimpeded
individual
initiative and crea-
tion of
wealth.
"This is still
a
country of tremendous
op-
portunity,"
he
said.
Henriot
concluded,
how-
ever, chat
the
United
cares
has
"a long way
co
go" before
it is
a
just
society. ··our
level
of poverty is unacceptable,"
Hcnriot
said.
"There
arc
much greater
unjust
countrie
in
the world,
but
I'm
a .S.
citizen and
1
wane my country
just," he
said.
MARIST MAGAZINE

FALL
1988



































s
PEAKER
Charles
j.
HyneJ,
Jpe,ial
prOJemtor
for the
Howard Beach
case.
Charles
J.
Hynes tells
Marist community to help
eradicate
racism
"OUR
GREATEST
strength in
this
society is our diversity ...
Charles J. Hynes, special
prosecucor in the
Howard
Beach
case,
had these words-
and
many more-to
share
when
he visited Marisc
College co
speak
on
racism
in
America,
and on the
lessons he
learned
from his work
on the
Howard
Beach
case.
The
case involved
an
incident in which one
black man was killed,
and
another
was
severely beaten
by
a group of
white teen-agers.
"Words can
kill,
bur
they
can also
heal," he
said.
And,
in thecaseofHoward
Beach,
Hynes
said,
words killed.
Jc
was an incident
provoked
entirely "by
the hate
and the
fury
and
the power
of
words,"
he
said.
" ricks and
scones do
break
bones
and
words
can destroy
you forever," he said.
Some
500
students, Marist
faculty members, ad-
ministracors
and
p
ople from
the surrounding
area
listened
as
Hynes
eloquently
and
forcefully denounced
racism
as a
societal
plague.
"When
the
true
scory
of
Howard Beach is cold we will
nor be
able
to
count the bro-
MARIST MA AZINE

FALL 1988
ken hearts," he said.
"Violence
against
an
indi-
vidual because
of our
differ-
ences
is destructive
to
the
fabric
of our society,"
he said.
A racially motivated
crime,
he
added,
should be punished
more severely than
a simple
assault
if law
enforcement
is
co
control racism
in
any
way.
But, he
continued,
there
is
little
law
enforcement can
do
to
curb
racism.
"I
am here not
as
an
expert
on race
relations, but
as a
prosecutor
to tell you that
law
enforcement
has no power in
race
relations," Hynes said.
The
answer,
he
said,
is
to
be
found
within
the daily
con-
duct
of
human
affairs. "We
must
stop calling each ocher
names
and
we muse
lower
our
voices
and
we must begin to
communicate,"
he said.
"If
this world is to be
a
better place, we must realize
we are the world," he said.
"Mindless
intolerance, what-
ever
its motive, has to end ...
Each individual is responsi-
ble for
eradicating
racism
from society, he said.
"He
who can protest and does nor
is
an
accomplice co the
ace,"
he said.
BUREAU
Marist Institute brings
national correspondents
to the college
THE MARI
T
lN T!TUTE
FOR
PUBLIC
OP!
ION
sponsored
a
series of speakers on "Media
Coverage of
che
1988 Presiden-
tial Campaign" as part of the
college's Cunneen-Hackett
Lecture eries. Evans Witt,
national political correspon-
dent for
the
Associated Press,
spoke on che use of polls
in
covering Presidential
cam-
paigns. Robert Boyd,
Washington bureau chief for
Knight-Ridder
newspapers,
and James Dickenson, politi-
cal
correspondent for
The
\'(I
ashing
ton Post,
together
gave an assessment of current
media
coverage
of the
Presi-
dential campaigns. Bonnie
Angelo, the northeastern
bureau chief for
Time
magazine, addressed the
European perspective on
cam-
paign coverage in the U.S.
Bonnie Angelo, 11ortheastem
blfreaN chief for
Time.
James Dickenson,
political
corre-
spondmt for
The
Washington
Pose.
Robert
Boyd,
\'(I
ashi11gto11
bureau
chief
for Knight-Ridder 11ewspapers.
Evans \'(lit!, national po!iticcd
correspondent
foohe Associated
Press.
-0
:,:
Sl
~
"'
-<
:,:
~
>
"'
c:,
c:,
"'
>
13
































14
"They will
probably
be
righl; lheJ•
11S11ally
are." --
ewsweek
IN
T!IE
u
IVERSE OF PUBLIC
Ori
ION
Pou..s
it's rhe
accu-
racy of your findings that
counts. A
large
srnff, a big
name, hype
and glitz
will not
win you
credibility
if your
results
are
not accurate.
'ince
its first poll in the
fall of
l978,
the Marist
Institute
for
Public
Opinion
(MIPO)
has been
get-
ting accurate result
, and
has
become one of the most reliable
polls. Today,
LO
years
after
it
began as
a
class research project,
when the press,
academic
re-
searchers, students and politi-
cians
wane co know how
people
111
ew
York State feel
on
a
given
i sue, the Marist
Institute
for
Public Opinion is
one of
the
first
places they
call.
The
ell'sweek
scory
from
which the above quote wa
taken-which
featured the
institute's polling
on
the
eve o
the
cw
York Presidential
primary
in
the spring
of
1984-was
correct
in
its
pre-
diction that the
institute
would
be right.
1
t was not the first
time MIPO was right, nor is it
likely to be the last.
"Marist's
polling
of
ew
York race voter
attitudes
is, of
course,
unrivaled in
the scare,"
said
eu•sweek
political corre-
spondent Howard Fineman.
"Their
polling
on
the rccenr
(
1988)
ew
York primary . was
right
on
the mark
...
How is it that
the
Marisc
1
nsci cute
gets onsiscently accu-
rate results'
"Our
mcchodology
is
unique," said Lee M. Mirin-
goff,
director of the institute
and
assistant professor
of
pol it-
ical science.
"We
do what
you
have
co
do
co
get an accurate
picture of the state,
and
that
means making the
correct
numberof
contact
calls in
each
of
the scace·s
62
counties."
The
Marist
Institute
for Public
Opinion
Marks
Its 10th
Anniversary
years and counting
Lee;l1.
/ll/ini1gqjf ;Jf/POtlirector.
/Jo/di,.,
/reIJ
co1;jere11,e
i11
Aloa,l)'
/0
rejJo/1
Illrllt!J'
r{?Jtr/11
011
t/Je
I
988
Pr(!J1Je111i,-,/
pni11,r1ry.
"Poll findings are
only
as
good as the sample
that is
chosen," explained
Barbara
L.
Carvalho,
associate
director of
the institute.
"If
you want co
poll
cw
York
rate, then
people must be selected
in
such
a way chat
they
reflect
the
opinions of all
New Yorkers,
and
the survey results
should
match what would occur if
everyone
in the state had been
interviewed. Thar's not
always
easy
to do."
The night before the
l9
4
ew
York Democratic Presi-
dential primary,
a
network poll
showed char the race between
Walrer Mondale, Gary Hart
and
Jesse Jackson was
too close
co
predict a victor. The Marist
Institute
for
Public Opinion,
however, had ju t released its
survey of ew
York Democrats
that showed Mondale was
going
tO
win handily. The day after
the primary
election,
which
Mondale won,
the
network
admitted that
rhc
sample
from
their poll was not representative
of
the
people who voted
in
the
election.
" ew
York State
is
the most
difficult
scare
in
the
nation
to
survey,"
Miringoff
said.
The
difficulty
in
the scare, Carvalho
explained,
i its diversity.
"A
great
deal
of
research must be
done on
the
areas to
be
called
co ensure
that
a
truly represen-
tative sample
of
people is
selected.
Then
you
need
co
review
years of data on
New
York State
co
detect
subtle
changes
chat may be
occur-
ring.
A
great deal of attention also
goes inco
formulating ques-
tions.
"A
quesrion has to be
precise
and
understandable,"
Miringoffsaid.
"Jr
has
co
be
valid
so
as
to
elicit genuine and
actual views.
onsiderarion is
also given
co the value
a
panicu-




























































y(,t,f~
,.,
Tl'.l'lt'II~
~,.V"','~
....
•""'
"'
101"'
.....
.
tll'IJ.
..
,
,.
,.,ao
r,,,1h•'§t:E. ._.
lar quesrion contributes to the
whole project.
The
overall
questionnaire
h,
s to be concise.
We
start with a
rough
draft
of
about 50
questions,
and use
between
20 to 30 in the
final
questionnaire.
Unlike many poLiing organi-
zations which conduct parri an
polls or cater ro interest groups,
MIPO
is a public
poll. Thar
is,
it does
not
hire
itself
our to
do
poll for
political
parries, candi-
dates
or
interest
groups.
Be-
cause of its public surveys on
ew
York Stace
officials and
issues,
ic does nor accept proj-
ects funded through state agen-
cies.
"We don'rcro s
line
or
mix
interests,"
Miringoff
said.
"This is vital to our success."
The institute al o doe nor
do polling for any individual
newspaper, television network
or magazine.
urvey
results
are
available
co
everyone.
"There's
no one else
like
us,"
Miringoff
said.
Alchough
more well-known
now
than
ar anytime in its
10-ycar history,
MJPO
is today
what it
always
has
been: an
independent,
n
nparri
an,
noncommissioned
polling
organization.
"We
arc truly a
public poll," said
·arvalho.
In
addirion ro eleccion poll-
ing, the institute
conduces
polls on many public policy
i sue
,
including
the
legal
drinking
age, the seat belt
law,
taxes,
the national budget def-
icit,
defense spending and vari-
ous ocher domestic and foreign
policy concerns.
"We're able to provide
in-
depth information and analysis
ro decision-makers,
the
media
and the Jublic on a wide range
Bush leads
Dole in NY
Marist Poll
ii)'MARCUUMB!!:RT
Auo1d.ated
PteU
Wr1tu
ALBANY
IAP)-
\Ilea Prtlli!Uflt
(.tori~
91,t,IJ) h&!i
lmpl"OY~ h•s
t,\-,illlllt1.g
•moDI!!
Nt'lilll York
R.ep!Wllcaru; IG
.al
beller lhliUI
:z.i
~d-
HIIIL&ljl:t:
11,1.-~r
Kan.t1H St:[I floti,l!rt
~it.
an lndtptndir:1111
p,011 r-~r~
Uld•~.
A~.
~R
L$
1110
clear
lr(lflt-
r\i
11111~r
unon1
Ni!•
Yc:irll
tkm~r,ill.$
wllh
romu:r
C:oloradc,
St11
G•I')'
H.ar\,
Lb• Rev.
JHM
J•cll:1on,
Mauubuntu,
GOI'
Mlcba~ Uuka.kLs
ind
lll1nols
Sen.
Paul SlmOf'I
illll
rt&li.ltirla(l.
lri
dou-
ti,~
digits
ltJ
l,1'e
l.ate:s:t
Ul-r'l'e)'
by
lh4!
MarlJ.L Colter;!! lruitlluh: f(lr Put,IK"
OJilnl(ia
ltiof.:HWlllit.
D11!:m(l(taltt: Go..-.
Mula Cuomr;,'w i.ppronl
ra.Ung
c,oa,Hnvn
l(I
l,Oat
-Wllb
T1
I p,erttlll
o,I
!'ilt1•
Yottltt1S"IJ"'t:Yed
1oll)'l11g
Ml
Wl:i
do
I.I'll
a
&ood
or
ntcllHt
Job
as
ilO"l"tt)tlr
And whlll!
Cwmo
bH
uld
be wlU
Ml
Ifft
Lb"
Dtmocrallc
prtsklH-
tlal IMMl'llHll011.
SO.ti
pen:at
OI Ne•
~orli.itf"I sv.rveyed
NJ bt lhcKl.1111
""" tor
1M:
White U(lu!A!:
■no t
I 2
pettent of
~
acll1111l1,-
lhl1'k he
..
,
\lihlle Bubapp,!andtoMwldffl•
1111
bD lead
(IYtr
Oote;
~n
Nie,.,
Yorlr.,
ll'Jt-
M
t:t!St
polJ lndl!::Jted
lh ■ I
tM
"let
presl.dftl m11J'lt
be
doinl IO al
the
vipenuof New Yorlr. Rep, Jaclt
K,emp
Ad.irid
-wti.o
IMy w01Jld,
~uppon
U
1.t141
,Jt.11t1fl
Aprlt
l,
!,ei::!'
IM!!d_
Tll)lllj',
ow zs it that the Marist Institute
gets consistently accurate results?
''Our methodology is unique.
Go,,ernor
t\la,
0
io
C1101110
to resea,·ch
their recently p11blished
book
uomo
Factor.
of is
ues
and trend as a commu-
nity service,"
Miringoff
said.
It
was a student project in
1978
rhar initiated the original
idea
of what would become the
Marist
Jnsritute
for
Public
Opinion. In
a political
ciencc
class called "Poli cical
Parries
and
Pre sure Groups"
taught
by
Miringoff,
students con-
ducted a oil of
Dutchess
County voccrs as
they left
the
eleccion boorhs in
Demo
rar
Lucille
Paccison's
uphill race
for
Dutchess
aunty execurive
in
1978.
"Weorganized
100 cudents
to
go out ro every election
discricc in the county starring
at 6 a.m.," Miringoffsaid.
"The
rudencs
had their maps
and
e senc chem ouc concinu-
ally rhroughour
rhe
day. Back
on campus,
in
a classroom, we
hand-tallied che results. Each
person doing the rallying was
responsible
for
recording the
vote by
a
different carcgory-
by parry, by sex, by age, by
region,
by ideology,
co
name a
few.
Our
dara showed char
Lucille Parri
on would core
highest in rhe mo r con erva-
rive
pares of
the
county.
We
wercskepcical, to say rhe lease.
But,
as
ir
happened, we were
right."
ince
then, MIPO' renown,
credibility and
impa
t
have
increased
dramatically.
During
rhi year's
ew
York
Presiden-
tial primary in
April,
the insri-
rure's work appeared
in
broad-
casts over ABC, CBS,
BC,
CNN and the BBC, and in
more
rhan 600 newspapers and
magazines, including
Time,
eu•sweek. Bmiuess Week, The
eu, York Times, The
\fl
ashi11g1011
Post
and
The Los Angeles Times.
"If
you were going
co
set a
table for
the
most influential
political reporters in rhe coun-
try and invite chem for dinner
rhen you could nor have asked
for a better group
than
the
people who called us," said
Miringoff.
"le
was particularly reward-
ing for the students," said
Carvalho. "They ha<l seen what
they
had done. They were very
proud. The strangers they were
calling
ro
interview for polls we
were doing
right up
to election
day would say things like,
'l
know you. You folk from
Marist
are doing a greac job.·
At char moment, the door
swings open.
Bur
there
ca □
always
be
times when the door swings
closed, and for
the
srudenc
pollsters, char is
noc
always
easy to cope with.
"A major hurdle is char in
making the
calls
a
good
rapporr
must
be established
in
a matter
of seconds,"
arvalhosaid.
"In
chat
rime,
our cudenr inter-
viewer must convince each
person they speak
co,
without
aying so, that even though you
don't
know
me,
I'm
from
a
legitimate
organization, what
I'm doing is important, and
rm interested
in your opinions
on
chis
topic."
ometimes, even a
rrange
twist
of face works co the insri-
tucc·s advantage.
"Once
we called an
Italian
familyin
ewYorkCicy,and
rhc
man
answered in
lcalian
saying
he
didn't speak En-
Lish," Miringoff
said.
"It
just
so happened chat rhc student
interviewer was
Italian
and he
replied
in
Italian.
Then
the
man
on rhe ocher end said in
Engli h,
'0.
K. You
got me.
What do
you wane?'"
rndenr parcic1pat1on
in
the





























16
lo
years
and
counting
insticuce's work
is, in
face,
an
integral
part of
its
role. "Over
the
years,"
Miringoff
said,
"thousands of
Marist College
students
have
b en
directly
involved
in the
polling
process
in
a variety of
ways. There
have
been
more than
50
scudencs
involved this year alone.
Some
do the inrerviewing,
some
work in media relations,
others
work in data processing. MIPO
attraccs
scudents from
a
variety
of
majors."
The institute,
said
ews-
week',
Fineman,
"seems co bea
model
for
what
ocher colleges
and
universicies have done,
and
should
do,
co become
laboratories for, and con-
tribucors
co, public opinion
survey
work."
In
addition co
its surveys,
MIPO
organizes ocher educa-
tional activities.
1t has
spon-
sored student
trips
co
Washington,
D.C.
co
meet
with representatives
policy-
makers
and the
press. It
regu-
larly
hosts
seminars on campus
for
students,
faculty and
the
PEANUTS
Ten years ttgo, Jt11dents
hand-
tallied su,-vey result,.
community
with national
jour-
nalists
and other
key
player
in
state and
national
issues.
MJPO
serves as a
resource
for faculty
and students at
Mari t
and
other colleges around
the
coun-
try
by
providing current infor-
mation on
national
and
ew
York
rate
election
issues.
nator Daniel
P.
Moynihan
of ewYorksaid
the
Marisc Institute provides
"an
11,dem
participation
ill
the irJSti-
tute
·s
work is an integral part
of
its
role.
applied
methodology most stu-
dents never have
the opportunity
co experience.
oynihan once
visited the instiruce's
offices
in
Adrian
Hall to speak to a class
and
co experience
fir thand
MIPO's work.
"In
their innovative
pro-
gram,"
said Bonnie Angelo,
Time
magazine's northeastern
regional
bureau
chief,
"student
are
not passive
note-takers. Lee
Miringoff
sends
chem into
acrion,
makes them participate
in the vibrant world
of politics
and
public
dialogue."
This kind
of education can
be an asset for cudems
when
they look for jobs after college.
A Marist
graduate who'd
been
involved
with the institute,
aroline
R. Kretz, is now
working in
Iew
York
icy
Mayor Ed Koch's
office.
She
worked
for che
institute in
1981
and
19
2
when
Mario
Cuomo was first running
for
Governor
of
ew
York,
and
again
in 19
4,
when President
Reagan was
seeking
re-eleccion.
"There
are criticisms
that
the college students of
the
l
980's are apathetic coward
eleccoral politics---as is evi-
denced by
low
voter
turnout
and are
disinterested
in politics
in
general,"
Krerzsaid.
"How-
ever, ac
Marisc
Dr.
Miringoff
was able
co
recruit
students
from
every academic discipline
and encourage
their
avid
par-
ticipation in the institute's
projects. These
scudents-
many
of
whom, mosr likely,
had
a ourse of study
far re-
moved
from
political science
or
who
may have had no real
interest in
politic
-were
af-
forded an opportunity
co
gain
an
insight
into and an
under-
standing of
the importance
of
rhc
electoral process
co
a democ-
racy
and
to the destiny
of the
nation
as a
whole;
an
under-
sranding
rhar rhey would nor
have
gained otherwi e."
Several
other
Marist
grad-
uate
are
now
working
in the
press and
in
politics.
"This
i
particularly
rewarding," Mirin-
goff
said,
"because
rhere is no
better mea ure
of our success."
In
addition co ics growing
authority on public policy
is-
sues,
the insrituce's repeated
appearances
in
the press
help
keep Marist
alumni
informed
about
the
college. "The
number
of
former
students who
see
us
now
and end
u
clips from
their local papers is remark-
able,"
Miringoff
said.
Thi
fall,
with
a
Presidenti, I
election
in November,
the
institute has been busy
con-
ducting
several polls co
learn
ab
ut the
state's attitude
coward
the
candidates,
this
rime usin
some
of
the
latest
computer
technology.
aid
Miringoff,
"We've come
a
long way from
the days
we
hand-tallied re ulrs
and carried
our
phones
around
from room
to
room
in a cardboard
box."

MARI T MA AZINE

FALL
19




















Looking good
Archi1ect11ml
m1deri11g
of
Om111el!)
H"/1
refl(Jl'ttliom.
Marist campus adds and updates
BEAUTY
is skin deep-and
deeper-on
the
Marisc
campus.
During
the past several
months, renovations have
been
underway
at the college co give
a
new
look
to
a
number
of
buildings and, further, co sig-
nificancly
improve
mechanical
systems and energy efficiency.
Preliminary
plans also are
underway
for a
new residence
hall
and a
new
classroom build-
ing
on
the
cam
pus. The
dorm i-
tory
is tentatively
scheduled for
completion and occupancy
in
the fall of
1990. According
to
Marist
Executive
Vice Presi-
dent Mark SuJI i
van, discussions
have begun
on a
new
combined
classroom
and office building,
scheduled
for occupancy in
three years when the
college's
lease
at
Marist
Ea t expires.
Major renovations
were com-
pleted
during
the
summer on
Champagnar Hall,
the college's
largest
dormitory.
The renovations included
the
replacement
of the exterior
glass
walls with solid, insulated
panels.
The building's
single-
layer windows were
replaced
with insulated
glass.
ullivan
said that rhe improvements
will save
Marist
sev/ilral
thousand
dollars
each year in
fuel coses.
The Champagnat renova-
tions
were
funded
in
large pare
with
a 300,000
low-interest
energy conservation
loan
from
the federal
Deparcmenc
of Edu-
cation.
The
rota! cosr for
the
MARIST MAGAZINE•
FALL 1988
energy conservation project
is
625,000.
Other
improve-
ments
to
the
residence
hall
were renovated study
lounges,
new lighting and new carpeting.
Another
improvement ro
Champagnar
Hall
was rhe in-
stallation of fiber-optic cable
providing
for telephone service
to
the rooms
in the
residence
hall
and for future connections
between
Champagnat
and
Marist's
new
IBM
3090
com-
puter
in
Donnelly Hall.
Planned
for
next
spring are
interior and exterior improve-
ments ro the
central entrance
area of
Champagnat
and the
adjoining
Campus Center
building.
"Improvements
to
the foyer will include the
instal-
lation
of a skylight co open
up
this
area,
ro make it lighter
and
more
appealing as a common
foyer area,"
said Sullivan. The
outside entrance area
will be-
come a
small
courtyard
with
plantings
and
benches.
Renovations
began this fall
on a
major,
three-phase pro-
ject
to
improve the
exterior
the interior
and
the mechani-
cal systems of
Donnelly Hall.
The
building is a
major
center
for
the
campus, including
academic and administrative
offices, classrooms and the
Marist
Computer Center.
The
Computer Center
re-
ceived extensive
renovations
during the summer to accom-
modate
the new mainframe
computer
chat is the
center-
piece of
the Mari
st-IBM
joint
study.
The
first phase of the
Don-
nelly Hall
renovations in-
volves
replacing
and extend-
ing
the exterior
wall
of the
building.
This
will provide
another 7,000 ro 8,000
square feet of pace.
The
building also
will have
a
reno-
vated lobby area and entry at
the northwest entrance of the
building.
Phase
two
will include
the
replacement
of the building's
mechanical
sysrcms-hcac-
ing, air conditioning and air
exchange systems.
Phase
three
will provide for significant
internal
renovations.
"Essen-
tially,
we are getting a whole
new building for approxi-
mately
2. 5 million.
Jn
roday's
marker, it would cost
IO
million
or
more
for
Marist
to
construct a
new
building of
this
size (87,000
square feet),"
Sullivan
said.
The Marist library
also
received renovations
during
the
summer,
including
an
improved and
modernized
lobby area.
The preferred site for
the
proposed dormitory is
an
area
directly behind the
Campus
Center where the
land
slopes
down to
the Hudson River.
A
contract for the design and
construction is expected
co
be
confirmed in early spring of
1989.

Continued improvements
made to Gartland Commons
John
J.
Gartland. Jr.
(right),
long-time member
of
the board
r>f
trmleeJ
and chairman of
the
board'J b11ildi11gJ
and grounds
commiflee. at one of
the
committee"s
ll'eekl;
meetingJ.
Gartland is
pictured
with tmstee and commillee
111e111ber
Jack
ewma11.
MARI
T
has made
con-
tinued improvements to the
Gartland Commons,
a 21-
acre parcel ofland including
garden apartments
and ath-
letic
fields ac che north end
of
campus.
amed after
prominent
attorney
and
long-time member of the
board
of
trustees, John
J.
Gartland, Jr., the Gartland
Commons includes four
two-story buildings which
house more than
300
sm-
dents. There also are several
athletic playing fields.
Recent improvements
include the construction of
a
stone river wall, providing
an area
for students to gather
and enjoy
views
of
the Hud-
son River; the
complerion of
several
new lighted basket-
ball
courts, and
exrensi ve
landscaping and plantings.
A
formal
dedication of
the Gartland Commons
area,
including the mount-
ing
of
a bronze plaque hon-
oring
Gartland and his wife,
Catherine, will be held
in
the
spring.
17






















18
the
Revolutionizing
college environment
by
Sman DeKrey
EARLY
Ot
JULY
27 a moving
van
backed
up
ro
rhe
service
entrance of
Donnelly Hall
on
the Marisr
campus.
Shortly
after 9 o'clock, a thin, blue
plastic seal-like
a
larger
ver-
sion of
rhe hos pi
ral
wrist
bands
worn
by
mothers
and their
newborn babies-was
cur from
rhe van
door by Carl Gerberich,
Marisr's vice
president for infor-
mation
services, and the
un-
loading
began. Wrapped
in
moving quilts, the
conrenrs
could
have
passed for desks and
chairs. Those
boxes,
weighing
a coral of 10 wns, contained
something quite different,
however,
and far more
val uablc.
ln
those crares
was rhe
heart
of one of
IBM's mosc
powerful
computers, a system worrh
more
than
10
million.
What
was being
unloaded
with rhar
system was even
more
valuable,
a commodity
wirhour
a price
rag: possibility. The possibility
of
using
computers a
never
before for reaching and
learn-
ing.
The p ssibilicy for a small
liberal
arcs colleg ro
be
a
na-
tional leader
in inregraring
rechnology
in
education. The
possibility of exploring
new
territory, limited only by one's
,magmanon.
Early
lase
year, executives
from
rhe
IBM
orporarion and
Marisr College
began informal
conversations about
ways
in
which
Marisc
could upgrade
irs
existing computer system,
which it
was rapidly outgrow-
ing.
A
year and a
halfof discus-
sions later,
Marisc
and
IBM
haveenrered
into a IO million,
five-year
joint
study rhar ha
posirioned
Marisc
ro
be
rhe
most
rechnologically
advanced
liberal
arc college in rhe
na-
rion.
S11sa11
DeKrey
is Mc1i-ist director
of p11blic
relatiom.
How a big corporation and
a small college combine
technology and the liberal arts
Eve,-, e1rade111ic
m'eCI
u·i/1
benefit
f,-0111
the 11el/'
m111p11ter
spte111.
The·
joint study
has
given
Mariscone
of
IBM's most
pow-
erful computer , the kind
u u-
ally found
in
large corporations,
but
never
before at a small
liberal arcs college.
The
com-
puter can
meet
all of
the
ad-
mini crarive
and academic
needs
any college is
likely
to
encounter roday and well into
the future.
Further, rhe
study
has put Mari r in
a position co
explore
rhe most innovative
possibilities for computer
rechnology in
education.
And
ir has given
che Marisr library
electronic capabilities shared
only by a few prestigious re-
search libraries.
"Thi
joint
study will make
Marisc
a
truly
disrincrive
Amer-
ican
insrirurion,"
said
Marisr
President Dennis
J.
Murray.
"There
will be rhe
large,
technologically
advanced
re-
search
institutions
and
then
there
will be the purely
liberal
arts college and
universities.
There
will
nor, however,
be
another small college with our
mission
ofliberal arts and com-
munity service chat will
have
this
kind of advanced
technol-
ogy.
For IBM, the study will
provide
rhe
opportunity for
rhe
corporation ro
look
20
years
inro
rhe furnre in a rele copic
five year .
During
char period,
IBM wants co
rest
whether
advanced
com
purer technology
can
be used as easily and by as
wide a variety of people as
lBM
has
posrulared
ir
can.
Marisr,
representative of a small ro
mid-size
cuscomer, will serve
as
a
rest sire to see what works
and
doesn't
work
as students,
faculty,
raff and community
members work with the new
computer
system.
"This
scudy
is
one of rhe
largest
between
IBM
and a
liberal arts college," said
James
Cannavino,
IBM
vice president
and
Dara
ysrems
Division
president.
"We
are
looking
forward co
working
wirh
Marisr
in developing
academic
appli-
cations of technology
char
can
shape educarion in rhe 2 lsr
century.
Marisr
is
uniquely
qualified co work with us be-
cause of our previous experience
with Marist's
graduate
pro-
gram in bu ine sand computer
science.
"There
will be a significant
academic improvement for
every student ar
Marisr,"
said
Marisr Pre
idem
Murray.
tll-
dencs
in rhe field
of computer
s ience,
he
said, will be using
truly
scace-of-rhe-arr
hardware
and oft ware nor often found ar
a college.
Majors
in
information
system will be exposed ro rhe
laresr dara bases and will see
how dara base technology
is
changing.
In
rhe communica-
tions
area srudenrs will have
some of
rhe
mo r current elec-
tronic
systems for
writing,
editing and publishing.
Busi-
ne students will
have
the rare
opporruniry
to
use rhe kind
of
computer used by
Fortune
500
corporations.
Psychology
MARI
T
MAGAZINE•
FALL
1988




















majors
can
study firsthand the
role of human
factors
in com-
puter technology.
cience
stu-
dents will be
able
co
conduct
experiments through computer
simulation
that
would be coo
costly
or
impractical co conduct
otherwise. Education majors
will
find the
networkir.g sy tern
useful when they
are
doing
their student teaching and
want
co
retrieve materials from
campus or communicate
with
faculty members.
The project has grown
dramatically from what most
people imagined in chose inirial
discussions a year
and a
half
ago
Beginning in
early 1987,
Marisc
conducted
a
study of the
college's computer system
co
assess
its strengths and weak-
nesses. Involved in the
assess-
ment were IBM technical per-
sonnel
and
people from the
Setting up
ill
the Computer
Center in Donnelly Hall.
college,
including admissions,
the
registrar"s
office,
the busi-
ness
office, the controller and
college advancement.
"During
the
assessment,
when we heard
about
the
larger
issues, such
as
upgrading the
library or developing
com-
munication networks, we felt
they were too big
for
us
to
tackle, that they would require
much more computing power
than
Marist
cou
Id
afford,"
said
Gerberich, Marist's vice presi-
dent for information services.
"
o
our
initial recommenda-
tions were
form
dest upgrades
co
the system, solutions
to
our
most immediate problems," he
said.
Jn response
to
those recom-
mendations, the Marist Board
of Trustees
and
Marist Presi-
dent Murray urged the
group
co broaden its scope, Gerberich
said,
"to
think bigger
and
not
tO
throw things like
rhe
library
or
communication links
over
rhe fence."
"Within
that
broader
framework, we began to
ask,
'Where
do we wane co
go and
what do we need co
get
there'',"
Gerberich said. To
become
better
acquainted
with
existing
0
E
OF
THE MOST
IMPORTA
'T
ASPECT
of
the Marist-lBM
;oifll sl!(dy
u'ill
be computer
co1111ections
thro11ghout
the
campus
and
beyond.
A fiber-optic network
11
1
ill
branch 0111
from
the powerf11l
mainframe
co111p11ter
in
D01111elly
Hall
to co111pfttei-
termi11als
in dormitories.
classrooms
and
labo1·atories.
the library, Maris!
extension sites, cmporate
trtti11ing
sites, cor1m11111ity
schools and
service organiwtions
thro11gho11t
the area.
MARJST MAGAZINE•
·ALL 1988
19


























20
rechnology
and
whar might
besr serve Marist's needs, Ger-
berich visited JBM laborarory
sires in
Ausrin,
Tex.;
and clo
er
ro
home
in Kingston
and
Poughkeepsie,
.Y.
''This
is when
I
scarred
get-
ting
very excited
about
the
possibilities,"
erberich
said.
"I aw
fir chand how the fron-
riers
of
rechnology were being
pushed
ahead
very rapidly.
There were new
conceprs
rhar
could
be used to build an
audio-
visual compurer.
ew
ways
were being developed
for
rhe
computer
ro visualize rhings
rhat had never been seen be-
fore-things
uch
as
the in-
teraction of acorns within a
complex
molecule.
"H
iscoricall
y rhe
com
pu cer
has
contributed
co
information
overload by
generaring
vase
volumes or daca; now the
com-
puter could
also
be used co
summarize, combine
and help
people visualize result
.
Large
columns
of data
could
now be
convened
into timely
and
un-
derstandable information. The
question remained,
'How could
these technological
advances
be
applied
co meer the needs
of
people''
I
felt Mari c wa
uniquely
equipped
co help
addres that question," he
said.
To
give
the project the ben-
efit
of ideas from everal differ-
ent
areas of the
college,
a Mari
t
committee
was
formed,
includ-
ing Murray
and
Gerberich;
Executive
Vice Pre idem Mark
ullivan; Vice President
for
Academic Affairs Marc van-
derHeyden; then Vice Presi-
dent for College Advancement
Anthony Cerncra; Marist Li-
brarian John Mc
incy,
and
Dirccror of orporate and
Foundation
Relations
Mary
Ellen Czerniak.
After
meeting
on
their
own
for several months, the com-
mittee began what would be-
come
a
series of fruitful and
mutually beneficial meetings
with an executive team from
IBM. They began an
exchange
of ideas on what Marist wanted
co
ac ompl
i hand how besr co
do it. The library had started
co become more and more
cen-
tral co che
group'
dis ussions,
and,
Gerberich said,
"There
began co be more and more
di
cussion about
Mari
t
in the
community-the
role and re-
sponsibilicy of che college in
the
larger
area."
What developed is
a
list
of
five basic objectives char Marisr
wanes co
accomplish:
l.
Expand and
improve
the
college's administrative
management system;
2.
Computerize
all
library
operarions
and
services;
3.
Provide
a computer com-
munications network
throughout
campus;
Provide
computer
links
between
campus and off-
campu
sires;
and,
5.
Establish computer
links
co
community
school
and
service
organizations co
provide
access
co Matisr's
·•1 chink char was the break-
through
for
us, the concept
of
immense
capacity," said
zer-
niak.
"Jr
opened up our chink-
ing tremendously.
Ir
elimi-
nated the stumbling blocks.
Imagine-you're
crying
co
solve a complicated problem
and suddenly
you're
given al-
most unlimited resources with
which co
solve
it.
"le
was
an
exhilarating ex-
perience co have chat
concept
co work with,
bur also over-
whelming,
especially
initially,"
she
continued. "The campus
groups
we mer
wirh
had much
the same
reaction
co the pos-
sibilities.
There was
exciremenc
and rhen the
reaction
of 'This
''
"ff
we only
talk
abo11t
power.
hard111are
and lerhnology.
u
1
e're
missing the boat.
\Vhat u•e're really talking
abo11t
are better services
to st1tdents
. . ,
-Carl
Ge1·berich
T11'0
111e111ben
of
the joint
st11dy
team, Carl Gerberich
(right),
Maris/
vice
presidem for i11for111ation
services,
and Charles T11l!er.
aJJistanl
to
the IBM Dctla
ystems
Division preside/It.
educational
resources
and
personnel.
Cannavino, his
a
sisrant
Charle Tuller,
and
Arr
corr,
JBM project
coordinacor
for rhe
joint study, were key player
from
I
BM on rhe development
of rhe study. They determined
the kind
of computer
ysrem
Marisc would need co
ac-
complish its
five
ambiriou
objectives. "As we were kicking
chis
aroLind, the concept of
infinite MIP
emerged," said
Tuller. As he
explained,
infi-
nite MIPS
(millions
ofinsrruc-
rions per second, a measure of
computing
power) really meant
giving
Mari t unlimited com-
puring power in terms of the
needs an institution
of
ir size
would
ever
have.
is roo big.' We
all
went through
the process
of
raising our think-
ing co meet the challenge
...
"When
Marisr had the
434
l
(it
previou mainframe
sys-
tem), ic had only so much
power," said Scott.
'The
people
who programmed it had
to
chink very carefully
about
what
they were going ro do with that
limited power.
ow
there's
been
a
dramatic
change
in
empha
is. IBM has
aid: 'Lee's
find our what you need co do
your job
and
chen support
you
in
char.
Lee's bring co
Mari
r
a
machine so powerful
char you
always
have more chan
enough
compuring
power.' So we've
brought up che
computer
plat-
form with
IBM's
model
3090,
and
it means a quantum leap
in
computing
apability."
A
great
deal
of
the
3090's
computing
power will be used
co make the system
as
easy to
use
as
possible, co
allow
the
student, the faculty member
and
the administracor ro begin
using rhe technology without
extensive
rrai ni ng
and
wi rhour
che ervices
of a
programmer.
How well chis works is what
IBM will be
looking
ar
very
clo
ely.
"We
have
a
vi
ion of
the
future in which information
sy
rems will be used co
operate
a
huge daca warehouse," said
1BM's Tuller.
"By
asking a
series
of
questions, people
can
access char warehou e
for
what
they
want
and,
in
es
ence, do
~
their
own
programming
wich-
!:l
ourrealizingir.
Wegiverhem
:.!
rhe apabiliry co use the data
b
and
everyone
gees
almost
a
z
tailor-made application.
The
capabi
liry
co do chis
exist ,
bur
right now very
few customers
can afford enough computer
power. With
coses going
down
each
year,
customers
wi II be
able co
afford ir in the
future.
The joint study with Marisr
gives
IBM the
ability
ro
look
into that furn re
a
I irrle sooner,
co
ee
if what we believe will
work does work."
In
shore, the joi nc
scud
y is
as
e
oceric as
re ring
one's
vision
of the future and
as
down-ro-
earth as
any
solid marketing
analysis
of
what produces will
sell. As Tuller added in regard
co the latter,
..
I
r's the question
of
'What
if che cloches
only
look
good on
the modeP'
"
A ream of IBM and Marisr
staff
will monitor the joint
study on an ongoing ba is.
Marisr staff,
faculty and
stu-
dents wi II provide feedback on
how well
the
sy
rem is work-
ing, with particular
emphasis
on
"human
faccors"-che
ways
in which people interact with
the machinery
and
vice versa.
Thar cask
involves
looking at
the
computer
themselve
,
the
entire working
environmenc-
che
lighting,
noise
levels,
com-
fort of the
chairs-the
ways
in
which information
gees com-
municated over computer net-
works.
"Do
you like ir
che
way ic is?
Don't
put
up
with
it
if you
don't like ir. Tell us what it is
chat works and doesn't work,"
MARI T MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988



































said corr. As
an
integral part
of
the study,
Mari
r will
develop human
factors cour es
which will
be
offered
to
stu-
dents
and to
IBM
personnel
who have
a
hand in developing
computers and
information
systems.
Tuller couched on
another
aspect
of human
factors-how
well rhe machines
can
interact
wich people.
"When you
use the system
regularly, shouldn't ic
begin
co
know something abour
you,
some
things about
your level
of
sophistication in using the
system, to be
able
co tailor
its
uses co
your
needs?" he
asked.
This point
is one
chat i
central
in discussions
about the
role
of computer
technology
in
libraries
and
in research in
general:
If
the system
can't
make the leaps the mind
can
make,
the
researcher
is
stymied. Bur how does
a com-
puterized
I
ibrary
system
pro-
vide
for
its use by
a
chi rd-grader
and also by a
Ph.D.
candidare'
How does the system make
adjustments for
the
particular
individual?
"The
library at Mari t pro-
vides us the
opporcuni
cy to see
a
broad
spectrum of
capabilities.
And we'll want
to
find an
answer
ro che question
of
'Can
the system cell the
difference
between
different
people usijig it''" Tuller said.
Bran bing
out
from
the
3090
will be
an
extensive
fiber-
opric network
connecting
the
mainframe
to computer
termi-
nals in dormitories,
classrooms,
laboratories, the library,
faculty
and
staff
offices, college exten-
sion
sires and ocher community
locations. This nccwork will
give srudents and faculty
the
abil
icy co
access
information
from many different locations;
co communicate electronically
on- and off-campus
as never
before,
and to
participate in
classroom activities and
re-
search in
innovacive and
cimc-
saving ways. Wich a terminal
and
modem,
adult students
at
their
homes
or offices
will be
able
co participate in a
class
or
use resources in the library.
farisc will be able
to offer
training to
corporate
sires
around
chc country and even in
ocher
countries.
"Access
is rhe most impor-
MARI T MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988
cane
thing," said
Gerberich.
"We
believe we
can
make
the
system
far
more
accessible.
Jf
we
talk about
power, hardware
and
technology, we' re missing
the boar. What
we're
really
talking
about are
better
ervices
co students."
"Educators across
the
coun-
try
are probing
rhe increasing
role of
the
computer as an
acrive cool
in the learning
proc-
ess,"
Sullivan
said. "The
joint
srudy
will
allow
us co
see
how
well the
computer serves
char
funcrion-in
rhe
classroom,
the
library,
laboratory,
the
remote training
ice
or the
quiet
of one's own
home. We
are
in the
forefront of a
move-
librarian McGinry
calls
rhe
"electronic
reserve room."
In
designing the
course
work
on
the Vietnam War,
the
hi
-
cory professor
and a
reference
librarian
would
have worked
cogecher co develop
a collection
of
relevant materials
on the
subject-articles,
books, maps,
government
reports,
scat1s-
tics-i n
effect com pi
Ii ng
a
new
dara base
tailored especially for
the tudencs
in
the history
class. Thar new data base is
then available for
use by stu-
dents
2
hour
a
day from their
dorm or
classrooms.
There is
no
wairing for someone else
co
be done with the materials,
chere is no need
co
make
copie
''
·'We
ewe
Looking
forward
to u•orking
u•ith Marist in developing academic
applications of technology
that can shape
ed11catio11
in the 21st cent11ry.
··
A
-James
Ca1111a1
1
ino
.
-
.
...
.
...
''
t
f
I
,
'
f •
f

f
'
t
A press
ro11ferwce
a111101111ci11g
the
jnillt study
U'tlS
held i11
J1111e.
Pict11red
(from
left)
are
Donald Love.
chairman of
the Marist Boa,·d
of
Tmstees;
Jcu11e.r
Ca1111avi110,
IBM
vice
president, preside111
of
the Data Systems
Division,
a11d
Mt1rist tmstee:
a11d
De1111isj.
Murray. Marist president.
menc char
could
dramatically
change
the traditional methods
of
instruction in
school and
colleges across
America," he
said.
A
look
at
the Mari r
I
ibrary,
I 992: A
srudenc studying
rhe
Vietnam War
for a ourse in
lace
20th century
history needs
to
research
and
write
a
term
paper. From his dormitory
room he
can acce s
with his
personal
computer
the indices
and catalogues
in the Marisc
library. He
can
find out what
materials
are available
in the
general
library
collecrion and
he
also can access what
Mari c
of materials,
and
students
can
choose the option
of
working
from their dorm
or classroom
rather
than going
co rhe li-
brary-an
option
chat provides
maximum Aexibilicy for
stu-
dents in using rhe resources.
"The
idea," McGinry said,
"is
that the library will
expand
from
a
print-oriented repository
co
a
more
electronically-based
resource. We will still provide
rhe
service libraries have tradi-
tionally provided, chat i
, 'You
cell us what you need and we'll
gee
it
for you.'
The difference
will be chat over time, many of
our
resources will be
on com-
puterized data base
instead
of
on
the library
shelf."
One
of the
most innovative
aspects of
the
electronic
library
is the possibility
of
being
able
co use
compacr
disks
for
the
storage of
information.
orn-
monly
called
CD-ROM
("com-
pact
disk
read-only
memory"),
rhe disks
can score an immen e
amount of
information rela-
tively inexpensively. One
5
1
/,
11
la
er
disk
can contain
the same
amount of
information
as
1,200
Aoppy di ks. The 12-volume
Oxford
E11glish
Dictifll/(/ry
can
be
scored on
cwo disks.
This technology, with the
potential
of
putting
entire
volurnesondisks,
ha
exciting
ramifications
for
libraries. Li-
brary holdings
can
increase
many rimes
over
if books
can
be put
inexpensively
on com-
pacrdisks.
corageand retrieval
are
implified. le
can give
rhe
library
user acce s co resources
from
all over
rhe world.
"I
c
could
be much like rhe world's
collection
of
literature
right
here
on campus,"
said
core.
As
part of
rhe joinc tudy,
[BM
and
Mari c will
explore
the u
es for
these
opri al
storage
disks, both
for academic and
for commercial settings.
\X/hen
they
are
implemented
as
part
of the
technology in che Mari
st
library, people will be able ro
get an electronic
r I
lica
of
the
printed page, including rhe
text,
arr, graphs and
ocher
visual clements.
"The
technology
of
rhc opti-
cal storage
units
gives
Marisc
apabiliries chat
only
the big
research libraries like Carnegie-
Mellon
and
Ohio
tate have,"
McGinry
said.
"This
puts us in
rhe forefront of liberal
arcs
colleges
as well
as
in the fore-
front
ofl
ibrary development
for
the future."
Thar Marisc remain
a college
dedicated co the liberal
arcs,
ro
reaching
and community ser-
vice, has
been an
integral pare
of
rhe joinr
srudy
from
rhe
beginning.
"\"X/hat
makes ir unique,"
Marisc President Murray said,
"is
chat it provides
a
liberal
arc
college
known
for
ics
teaching
and community
service with an
opportunity co
continue
its
development in the most
sophisticated
computer
and
communications environment.
le
is a
once-in-a-lifetime
oppor-
tunity for any educational
m-
riturion
of any size."

21






























Marist College Vite
President
for Acctdemic
Affairs
/\1arc
A.
wmderHeydefl
s/1omored
the
Seventh
A11nNal
Famlty
Retm1t
al
\f/illia111s
Lake
Hotel
ill
Rosen-
dale, .
Y.,
onja1111ary
l2and
13
of this year. Fo!!owi11g
is all
edited version of
the
text of wm-
dedieyden 's openi11g
rtddress
to
the
faculty entitled
"Reflectiom
011
B/00111."
PROFES
OR
ALLA
Bwo
r
book,
TheC!osi11go/theA111erica11
Mind,
ha
caused a great stir.
There
is no
doubt
that
a
large
number
of academic people,
primarily those over 40,
at first
found
the
book enjoyable and
refreshing reading-enjoyable,
in
that
it
most likely
confirmed
many
of
the
conversations
academics
have
had
with
col-
leagues over
the
past
decade
about
the
decline of
true
intel-
leccual
pursuits;
refreshing,
because it
was expre sed in an
engaging fashion that all
academics
have
hoped
they
could one day do
themselves.
This
was particularly
true
for
those part
of
the book
that
described student
behavior
today
and
in
the 1960's.
The
book
was pleasant
co
read-
pleasant because 'to read
about
Rousseau
and
Kant, to
wander
through
the
writings
of
Plato,
to
regain
familiarity
with the
Ancients,
to
peruse American
university life
are such civilized
ways of
spending
a summer
month.
In
rhe last analysis,
it
was
a good
and rewarding
feel-
ing that at
least we fellow
academicians
understood what
Allan Bloom
was saying.
The
recognition that fortunately
Otfl'
minds were not
closed could
soothe even the
most
cynical
among
us,
and,
therefore,
the
wisdom
of
Bloom was widely
accepted because
it
truly pro-
duced a great summer.
Only
after
summer vacation
came
co
an end and conversa-
tions with colleagues ensued at
the
beginning
of
rhe
fall semes-
ter,
did
we discern
a
different
message. Only
then did the
real
truths of
Allan Bloom's
book
come
through,
and
this was
disturbing.
When
perceptive
reviews
appeared, beginning
with
one
in
The
Chro11ide
of
Higher
EdNcation
by James P.
Buchanan
and oncluding
with
22
Theopening
ofthe
American
mind
Marc vanderHeyden reflects
on
liberal education
an even
more insightful
one by
Martha
ussbaum in
The ew
York
Review
of
Books
la
t
o-
vember, it became more and
more obvious
that Professor
Bloom's mis ive wa more
com-
plex and
less
pleasurable than
we
had first thought. Among
the
critical observations
that
were
seriously damaging
co
Bloom's
position are the ones
articulated
by
ussbaum.
These
related primarily
co
Bloom
·s systematic
ignoring
of
history,
women, diversity of
learners
and
rrue philosophy.
ercain other aspens are
dis-
turbing
as
well,
and
I
would
like
co
share them
with
you
briefly.
Fir c, Professor Bloom
ap-
peared
co
be
so
much in love
with
ocraces and
Rousseau
that he has
found
it nece
sary
co
explain
mosrofhi
nostalgic
review
exclusively
in
terms
of
rhe impact
of both.
A man in
love should nor speak
so
loudly_
econdl y, and more
trouble-
some, is Professor Bloom's
virtually
dogmatic
stand on
the
German
ancestry of
university
life in America. He isdepiccing
such an exclusive
inheritance
char it does nor
permit
the
full
legitimacy
of many other con-
tributing factors, in particular,
rhe authentic
American
con-
rriburion
to
American
univer-
sity life, a contribution that has
subsequently
informed
univer-
sity
life
in
most
parts of rhe
world.
Finally, it is also clear
throughout the book rhar Pro-
fessor Bloom
i angry.
or only
is he
angry about
the
current
crop of studenrs,
whom he
believes
co
be
relativistic
and
atavistic, bur angry at his ex-
periences
with
srudents.
Angry
professors should
not teach.
What Professor Bloom
fails
co
see is
char
che education of
the American mind
is
not the
exclusive property, privilege,
duty, or
responsibility
of
the
American
professoriate. Educa-
tion
has never
been
relegated
co
the
ivy
domain of
the univer-
sity.
The
opening of the mind
never had
co
wair for the final
rep of a
university
education.
Professor Bloom
·s satisfaction
with the Grear Books
education
overlook
the
fact that success-
ful application of
this method
only
had meaningful
and
last-
ing
valoe
when the
books
were
read
at
home, nor
at the
univer-
sity.
ln
the idealistic conrext of
rhe European
universities
of rhe
past, one that
Professor Bloom
seems
co
respect
so
much,
ir
should
not
be forgotten
chat
the Grear
Books
were
known
before students came
co
rhe
university
and
have,
therefore,
always
been the
proof and
il-
lustration
that
the real
lifelong
teachers
are
parents
and grand-
parents, siblings and friends ar
home.
Another
element
that Profes-
sor
Bloom
seems
co
ignore
is
rhe efforts of the
American
professoriare and
the American
universities
throughout
rhe
crisis of
rhe
L960's and
l
970's,
a
rime
period he so deplores.
le
was the American university
that
kept democratic ideas
in
fronr of the
American public.
It
was
the
faculty and students
who
engaged rhe country in a
s
vere critique of
the Vietnam
War.
Jc
was the
universities
chat
led people inro the
Peace
Corps throughout
the 1960's.
It
was rhe
universities
char
were
the incubating
spaces for
the
free
speech
movement.
This misleading
element
in
Bloom's
book-his
singular
attachment
to
a
German inheri-
MARJST MA AZI
E

FALL 1988



















cance,
his
exclusive focus on
Rousseau or
on
the Ivy
League--nevertheless,
should
not
diminish the validity of
his
descriptions of che
1960's
and
1970's.
ln
addition,
Professor
Bloom's
book cerrainly
has
enhanced and improved che
discussions
among the profes-
soriate of our
universities' re-
newed commitment
to
liberal
education.
le
is important
co be
reminded
of
rhe
fact
char
the
liberal
arcs are only che trunk
from which most
other
branches of study
have
de-
veloped
and
will
develop.
It
becomes
a
dangerous exercise
to focus exclusively on the
liberal
arts in a
hiscorical
con-
text.
History has
always
been
more
firmly
rooted
in
life
than
in school.
!t
is important char
we
as
professors
be
reminded
chat the "perennial ques-
tions"-Is
there a GodJ
What
is
life?
What is the nature
of
the
soul?-as
phrased by
the
scholastics during che
Middle
Ages,
are superseded
by rhe
basic and
natural need
to move
from
these que rions co the
frontiers
of knowledge.
This
movement will bring
about, in
due
time and after
painful exploration,
new in-
sights,
new
ramifications and
new
specializations in
che
fu-
wre.
The m-1e
opening of che
mind
will
not lie
in
the
per-
petuation and consolidation of
the
liberal
arr but rather
in
the
furthering of
the knowledge
that
is based upon chem. That's
where the excitement of true
university life will remain.
That
is the intellectual
game!
That
is
rhe sparking of the
mind! A
liberal
arcs education
chat is nor prepared to grow
in
uch
a
direction
will be ossified.
I
c is exact!
y
ch
is ki ncl
of spiri
c
that will permit
us
to move
constantly forward and further
inco
knowledge.
le will help
us
grow bolder in
what
we are
seeking.
It
will
remain
true
what
Plato
said,
chat life is
indeed dedicated
co rhe
excava-
tion
of
the
soul
and char rhe
most important thing
for all of
us
who wish to be liberally
educated is
to
"know
thyself."
The citizens of
Athens
be-
lieved char virtue
could be
raughc.
The humanises
of rhe
16th
century
believed that it
must be caught. Here we
have
MARJST
MAGAZJ
E

FALL 1988
one of the major shortcomings
of
Bloom'
book: cheabsenceof
mea wlpa
(my fault), or
an
admission of guilt on the pare
of the
entire
professoriare,
an
acknowledgment
chat
we have
not
lived
our
liberal
education.
We
have
been
distracted
from
our
cask. In
chis technological
society we
have
so
many
special-
ized
demands, and they
have
limited
our vision. Edward
Foster argued: "Students con-
cerned about jobs adjust or
limit
their
goals; colleges con-
cerned about survival accom-
modate; faculty concerned
about professional advancement
and personal security comply;
and
no
one's ultimate
interest
is
real I
y
served, especially nor
the republic's."
I
am still convinced that it
lies within all of us to
reverse
these
gloomy prediction
and
descriptions, including
Bloom's.
There is
no reason
why the best
cannot be moved
by conviccion and dri'Ven by a
passionate intensity.
This i
precisely what we
muse
ask
from the
American
profes-
soriare. We must
all
begin
to
combat
char
spiritual and inrel-
leccual
disintegration.
The
opposition of
student versus
teacher,
or professor versus
administrator, or
teaching
ver-
sus
research
are polarizations
that
we
can do wichouc.
We
belong co
the
1111iversitas.
We
can
rise
above
che
two cultures
chat C.P. Snow analyzed de-
cades ago, describing the
dichocomy between rhe
humanities and
technology. A
science uninformed by the
humanities
all coo easily be-
comes mindle s
technology,
while
a
humanist
who disallows
science and
technology
is sim-
ply
parading
his
or
her
own
ignorance.
It
will always remain, of
course, co speculate on whar
the real
demands of the
humanities ought co be.
The
right
goals are self-evident.
We
need history
chat confronts
ideas, not
just events or
ideologies. We
need
philosophy and
religion
chat
examine values, not trends or
obscurities.
We
need literature
that
seeks
meaning, nor
esoteric
dissertation.
We need
arc
that
develops
caste,
not leisure
skills.
We need
international
studies char analyze, nor de-
scribe.
We
need
social
and
natural
sciences
that
order and
1ncerprec,
nor Just enumerate.
Certainly we
must
be careful
chat wedo
nor
continue one of
the
most
fundamental errors we
have persiscenrly made with
regard
to rhe liberal arcs.
My
menror, Dean Dominic Iorio,
scared a decade ago, and
I
paraphrase, chat
we
have iden-
tified
the
disciplines with
the
liberal
arcs.
We have identified
the
scholar with
the
liberally-
educated person.
We have
equated courses and what hap-
pens in them
with learning.
We have,
in shore, confused
the liberal acts with a series of
historical
accidents.
The
liberal
arts transcend
university departments and
curricula. They
manifest
a
historical reality and presence
which at rimes correspond
to
what happens in univer ity
settings but, just as often,
they
receive their major nourish-
ment and vitality beyond the
walls
of
the university.
They
vibrate in monasteries, in pro-
fessional societies, in
reflective
individuals meditating
on
hill-
sides or working on a farm or
in
internships, in extracurricu-
lar accivi ties or in field experi-
ences,
in the homes
of the
affluent and of
the
poor. They
are found wherever
human
beings choose
to
be human and
choose
co
think about
what
that
means.
We
are affected
i nescap-
abl
y
by
what we
know.
The liberal arcs permit che
human mind to play, co play
che divine
game. The
liberal
arcs seek value and exhibit
the
necessity of an enduring com-
mitment
to
value scrutiny.
Dominic Iorio
eloquently de-
scribed chis as the ability
to
recognize
and expose the
fraudulent; co respect
the
free-
dom and worth of the person;
co
respecc
the promise and the
limits
of our physical environ-
ment; co discern and enhance
che beautiful and the worthy;
to
respect the
excellent and,
yes, to pursue the spiricual-
rhe ultimate dimension.
In
the final analysis,
che
raison d'etre
of
the liberal
acts is
not
for
the
purpose of develop-
ing
a rational animal but a
moral
agent who combines the
true and the good in a
unified
scheme. Thus
we
come close
to
rhe definition of the educated
person espoused by
John
Cardi-
nal
Newman
a century ago in
Theldeaof a
University.
He
said
r hat
only when we are educated
will we
know
how
to
be
tender
coward the bashful, gentle
coward the
dis rant, and
merci-
ful coward the absurd.
Only
this
kind of person can bring
order
to
a
world chat
is always
one generation away from intel-
lectual
and moral
barbarism.

23

























2
The
Soviet Union Observed
T
HES0VlETU
JON, likeany
narion, is
a produce of ics his-
rory and,
at the
same
time,
a
malleable
abstraction groping
roward
an
unknown
future.
What made the Marisc
Educa-
tional Friendship Tour Jase
March
tO
the Soviet
Union
so
special was timing. We saw
a
nation, led by Soviet
leader
Mikhail Gorbachev,
in the
throes
of
change perhaps no less
dramatic
than the Russian
Revolution
of
1917
which
culminated
in the proclamation
in
1922
of
the
Union of
Soviet
Socialist Republics.
The,tour
itinerary-selected
by Dr. Casimir
orkeliunas,
Marisc's professor
of
Russian
and
leader
of the
rour-in-
cluded
visirs to rhe nation's
most ancient and
important
centers of culture,
hisrory
and
political power. There were
Moscow, the
symbolic
heart
of
the
oviet
Union
and
the
gov-
ernment
center;
Leningrad,
Russia's
young, Europeanized
city,
the
former capital,
rhe
world's most northerly
city;
Vladimir
and
uzdal,
ancienr
centers of
Russian Orthodoxy,
which rhis year is
celebrating
its
millennium. All
four are in
rhe Russian Federated Soviet
ocialist Republic,
orwhar
we
call
Russia.
Some of the
34
travelers
on
rhe
rour, including under-
graduate
students,
adult
ru-
dents
and
people from the
community,
cook
the
cri
p
for
college credit.
Ochers, such
as
myself, went for personal
en-
richment. The sightseeing
and
the hiscory lessons chat
filled
much of our days were
only
some
of
the memorable
aspects
of
the trip. Another,
perhaps
more personally
profound as-
pect for me, was
seeing
the
people Jiving there now, watch-
ing them,
talking
wirh them,
learning from them. Seeing rhe
kind
of
daily
conditions
the
Russians live in was itself
an
experience
more valuable than
S
haileen Kopec
is dh-ector
of enroll-
111e111
co1111111micc1tio11s
ct/
Marist.
Marist Friendship Tour
provides a firsthand look
Maris/
s111dentje,mifer
I
acifposes
ui1hc1
gm11po/Sol'ie1
soldien
III
J\loscmr's
Red
Sq11are.
Eten e1
)'fl:11"
ago,
1aki11ipho1os
ofsoldim urJ11ld
hate been
pmhibited.
anything
I
could have
learned
from
a book, particularly at
chis poinc in the
nation's
cur-
rent affairs.
I
remember
when
we
were
preparing for the
trip
we
were
warned--despice
glas-
nost
(openness) and
peres1roike1
(reconscruction)-not
to talk
about policies
with the Soviets
we
would meet. Bue,
as it
turned
our,
it
was they, our
oviet guides
in particular,
who
initiated such discussions.
"There were more people
killed
during
(Joseph)
Stalin's
rime than any ocher in our
country,'' admitted one of our
guides
during
a
bus ride from
Suzdal
tO
Moscow. She
said
that she was neither "defend-
ing"
ralin
nor
"destroying"
him.
She,
like
so
many
ocher
Russians, it
seemed to me
then,
was
at
last trying
to come
co grips with an
honest
and
public appraisal of a tyrant who
for so long
had been held
sacred
and
above
criticism.
"Jr
is
o
complicated," she said.
"There
were
evil things,
but
there were
also good things.
le
is human
nature
to divide this into good
or bad, but that's
nor the
way
it is."
ciU,
despite
the
changes,
therewasche
ilent,suppre
sed,
sad
Ru
ia.
In Leningrad, leav-
ing the
Hermitage Museum,
we
stepped our into
the
snow,
exhilarated at
having
seen some
of
the world's
finest
works
of
art.
Bue l
was suddenly
upset
when
I
saw the
long line
of
Soviers waiting
co gee in.
I
remembered how
foreign rouriscs
are
lee in
ahead of
Soviets
at
museums,
and
while
I
enjoyed
this
privilege
l felt
at
that
moment
chat it was unfair.
The
group silently scared at
u
with
a penetrating
but
emotionless
stare.
J
looked back
at
chem,
a
little
self-consciously, and
noticed
how they were
all
wait-
ing so pacienrly as a few others
in our group
frolicked
in
the
falling snow.
Another reminder
was the
shortage of consumer goods.
The
black
marker
for
Western
fashions
is
such
char
one student
on the trip was offered 200 for
his blue denim, Aeece-lined
jacket and
150
for
his Ray Ban
sunglasses.
Also, when we
ripped taxi drivers
and
hotel
clerks
we did nor use money
but ball-point
pens,
bars of
soap, pairs of stockings, small
berries
of
hand
lotion and
bi re-
sized chocolates.
American
cigarettes are especially prized.
Even children
learn
at an early
age
tO
mine
foreigners for
treas-
ures from the We
c.
Ac more
places than
I
can count, young
people approached
us,
asking,
"You
trade?"
which
meant
they
wanted chewing gum in ex-
change for a small souvenir pin.
It
all seemed so demeaning to
me, but
in
reality it
was
not
so
ro
chem.
"We
want it,''
a guide
told
me.
During the
end of our
trip
I
realized
that
I
never
once aw
a
parent with more
than one
child.
I
mentioned
rhis ro
another guide and she explained
that,
de
pite financial
in en-
rives
given
tO
parents
tO
have
more
children,
the
average
family in
the
cities
ha no more
than
one child.
Our
guide
described to us what the Rus-
ians
call a "Mother
Hero."
he
is
a
woman
who
has
at
lease
six
children.
After che birch
of
her
sixth child, she
is
given a
large
apartment,
money and a van.
Yer,
the guide aid,
rhere
are
few
takers.
Once, looking
down
from
my
19rh
floor room
in
che
massive Cosmo Hore I in Mo
-
cow,
I
saw a
large skating rink
full of children,
Jiding
around
on
their
shoes.
A father
chased
his
young son on
the ice
and
the father
lee himself be
chased.
After
a
moment, ic
truck me
how similar the whole
scene
was
co
something you'd see
in
some
mall
town
in America.
There
i reason
co
hope
chat
differences
between our
two
countries
will
someday
be less
worrisome and
threatening
as
each of
u
opens
up
ro
the
ocher, and even shares a
laugh.
During
a
Aoor
show
intermis-
sion at a farewell
banquet in
Mo
cow
I
went looking
for
the
women's room.
I
learned
the
hard
way
to look very
carefully
at the carved
wooden
silhou-
MARI
T
MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988


































ettes on che
bathroom
doors
when, in Vladimir, l mistak-
enly
walked into the men's
room. This time,
certain of
the
skirted carving,
I pushed
open
the door
and
was suddenly
face-to-face
with
a
portly Rus-
sian man wearing
a
hotel uni-
form.
I looked
at
him
and
he
looked
at
me. l looked
at
the
sign, and
then our eyes
mer
again and
he
burst our
in
a
hearty laugh
and
bowed with
a
flourish
co allow
me in. Then,
with
a grin
he
boomed out,
"Pe,·estroika.'"
le
is important for
us to
see
how the oviecs
live.
It is
equally important,
however,
for
them co see how we
live,
and
one encouraging sign of
chis was
on the
Aeroflot plane
coming back co ew
York. We
learned
that
on
board there
were
several
Lithuanians
going
co
visit relatives who had
emi-
grated
ro the
ni
red
cares
years
before. Dr.
orkeliunas
was
especially excited because
he himselfhad
emigrated
from
Lithuania
co
the United
races
whenhewasachild.
[watched
h'lV7
We
saw a nation
in the throes of change
perhaps no less dramatic
than what occurred
d11r-
ing the
R1tssian
Revo!t1-
tion in 1917."
him
as
he walked
around cal k-
ing
co
them in
their
native
congue.
Once he
came
back
co
cell me
about
them. One man
who'd
been
imprisoned in
iberia for 22 years was on
his
way co visit
his
brother
in
Queens. A
94-year-old woman
was
going to visit
her
sister.
"One
woman's
brother
is
a
famous
artist
and she hasn't
seen
him
for47 years,"
he
said.
Dr.
orkeli
unas
paused and
then continued. "Jmaginehav-
ing
Ireland
closed off for
47
years,"
he
said, referring tomy
Irish heri
cage.
"It's
really
happening," he
said co me after talking with
the Lithuanians.
''I can't believe
ic. Gorbachev is
really
doing
good
things."

Window shopping on Red Square
ALICE
PROVENSEN.
of Cli11to11
Hollow,
.
Y.,
iJ
a distinguished
write,· a11d
iilmtrator of childreu 's
literat11re.
Provemen,
with he,·
late
h11Jband.
Martin, haswrille11a11d
illmtrated
more
them
50
books.
The
Provemens
ea,-11ed
1111111ero11J
awards,
i11d11ding
two
prestigio11s
Caldecott Medal cnva,·ds, the more
rece11t
of which was in 1984 for
The Glorious Flight.
At
Marist's l987Com111e11ce111e111,
the
Provemem
U'ere
awarded a joi111
honorary
Docto,·
of H"mane Letters
degree.
Proveme:11
was one of the 34
travelers
to the oviet U nio11011
the
Marist Ed11cational
Friend.ship
Tom·.
Pictured
i11
the
backgroN11d
iJ
the
Cathed,·al of St.
Basil
the
Blessed in Moscow's
Red
q11are.
(The sign reads: Official Use
Only.)
Whilei11theSovie1
U11io11,
she kept a detailed ditiry. Follow-
ing is an excerpt describing her
fomy into the Soviet U 11ion
's
largest
store
in Moscow,
G.
V.
M.,
the
late Universal
Depart111ell/
Store.
''The descriptions
of the oviet stores
so1111d
like
rat he,· a negative crit i-
cism,"
Provensen
said.
"I
do11'1
i111e11d
the1111hat
way, but only as
an observatio11.
Com11me1·
good.s
are, afte,· all, what a par/ of
perestroika
is about."
G.U.M.,
the state depart-
ment
store on
Red
q
uare,
is
a
three-tiered,
glass enclosed
Victorian-like structure-in
concept,
a
shopping mall.
Its
three-storied aisles are lined
with small shops selling cloth-
ing,
lingerie,
men's wear,
shoes,
fabrics,
linens, house-
hold
appliances,
kitchen
uren-
MARI T
MA AZINE

FALL 1988
Alice
Provensen
siJs and
hardware,
each
in
1rs
cubicle, each with
its
patient
customers, each with
its
epa-
rate
line
at
the
cashier, each
with
its
poor merchandise.
Everything looked as
though
it
had been designed and fabri-
cated
in
Iowa
in the l930's.
I
stood on an iron balcony
looking down at the whole
complex. There was a gray and
white
crow-sized
Russian
bird
perched on a baroque lighting
fixture.
He
seemed co
have
the
run of
rhe
entire enclosure.
I didn't buy anything but
1
was
intrigued by what I saw. I
began
co spend
what
little
spare
time I had
looking in shop
windows and going
in
shops
when
they
were open.
The home
furnishing stores
aretheequivalencofour
alva-
rion Army
scores.
The up-
holstered
furniture
is
hideous,
but
I did
see a few fragile,
pretty chairs
lacquered
with
che
same designs as the Khok-
loma wooden bowls.
The
home
eleccrical appli-
ance score
had
one
iron,
two
fans,
three
hot places and a few
miscellaneous grinders, chop-
pers and percolacors. The lamps
were, again, vintage
1930's.
The
refrigerators were small
and fragile
looking,
and expen-
sive.
The
clothes washers were
scarcely aucomacic.
I ran
inco
arasha, our
guide, in a shoe store. We
debated
the
quality and appear-
ance of a pair of shoes she
wanted co buy for her husband.
They were
leather with compos-
ition soles
and cost 60 rubles
(one-quarrer month's pay).
They looked
co me
rather
like
inexpensive K-Marr shoes and
were almost yellow in color.
Mose of the men and women in
Moscow
and Leningrad wore
smart-looking
shoes or boots.
I
didn't
see
them for sale any-
where.
The Gasrronom shops in
Moscow
mu t be some sort of
chain.
I
saw
them
everywhere.
Again a largish space is divided
into small cubicles selling,
respectively, meat, fish, pas-
tries, vegetables, delicatessen
produces, milk, eggs, bread,
candies and bottled
waters.
There
wa
not
a
large
supply of
any of it.
The fish
looked
fresh.
The
meac
cues were unrecognizable.
Green peppers, onions, cab-
bage, carrots and dried mush-
rooms were offered at the green
grocers-all
winter vegetables.
I
wondered where the peppers
came from. There were apples
and small hard oranges for sale.
Potatoes
were plentiful, a were
cereal grains and pa
ta
in small
packages.
lt
muse
cake several hours co
gee a meal on the table. There
were lines of four or five people
ac each stall where one was
given a chit for the intended
purchase. The accumulated
chics were taken co a central
cashier, again a
line, this
rime
very long.
The accounting was
done on an abacus. The food
was paid for and marked-paid
chics were then raken back co
the respective sralls
to
pick up
the original purchase, again
standing in line
to
do so.
1f
a
Russian
were to wander
around an ordinary Shop-Rite
or, Caldor he
would
probably
think we must
have
sold our
souls.
Perhaps
he
would
be
willing co go co the devil as
well.
25






































26
Hope and Change
in
the Soviet Union
An
Interview
with Dr. Casimir Norkeliunas
Ar
Tl-IE
OVIET
u
10
·s
Communist
Party
conference
during
the mmmer,the Soviet Leader,
Mikhail Gorbachev,
gained wide-
1pread
support
for his unprecedented
proposals
of
g
lasnosc-openness-
and perescroika-reco,.wruction.
What was additionally
striking
were the candid admissiom
by
many Leaders
of the failings of the
Soviet system.
Dr. Ca1imir
orkeliunas,
associt1te
/1rofessor
of
R,wian
al
Mari
st.
who Led
the /11c1ris1
Edu-
cational Friendship Tour lo the
Russian
Republic
last winter, has
a 1ense
that
Life
there truly is
changing/or
the
better.
f-1
is insigh/J
are especially
meaning/11/;
he was
born
in the oviet U11io11-
Kybarti,
the Soviet Socia/isl Re-
public
of
Lithuania. The
or-
keli11nas
family
emigrated
to the
United Stales in
1949.
nr-
keliunas,
51,
has been a member
of
the Marist faculty
since
1963,
and helped develop the Russian
major and minor
al
Maris/ in
cooperation
with Vassar College
and
the tate University
of ew
York
(
UNY) al
ew
Paltz.
orkeli,mas
is
also an
adjunct
professor
of
Rtmian
civilization
at
SU Y ewPaltz. Thefoilowing
interview was conducted
by
James
Kuilander, assistant director of
public
,-elations,
who also recently
visited
the Soviet Union, traveling
on
the Trans-Siberian train from
Beijing, China to Moscow and
visiting many
of
the
Jame
cities
as
the Marist E4ucationa/ Friendship
Tour.
KULLA
DER:
For the past
year
we
have been reading in the news-
papers a
great
deal about the
changes
proposed
in the Soviet
Union, about
glasnost
and
peres-
troika.
Solzhenitsyn, as
yo11
point
0111
in
a paper of yours, has been
telling the
\\1/eJt
that there
cannot
be any form of
communism
other
than evil, there are no better
vari-
ance, of communism, that it
iJ
incapable
of g,·owing
kinder.
\11/
hat
does Gorbachev's
proposal
offer the
com1non
man and woman in the
oviet
Union?
ORKEL!U
AS:
Greater
economic opportunity
in
the
future
and a better standard of
living.
The reforms
are address-
ed
co improve
and ro
modernize
the
country's economic back-
wardness.
The
statistics that
moved
Gorbachev to
introduce
these
reforms probably came forth at
the
27th
Parry
Congress in
February 1986.
lt
was there
that, after assuming leadership,
he brainsrormed
the
problems
ofrhecouncry. He
had
a whole
army of experts who
looked
at
certain aspects of
the
economy
in
industry and consumer
goods,
and
1
chink that he
conducted a
chink-tank
ap-
proach on what some of
the
key
problems were, and are sci
11,
in
the Soviet Union.
And these
experts
drew
him
a master
plan, providing
him
with up-
to-dare srari tics on rhe Soviet
Union, especially on economic
and industrial development,
and compared
rhe
oviec scaris-
rical development ro
char in
the
nired rates and ocher
West-
ern countries.
According
co the compara-
tive indices of
the
two super-
powers, the gross national
product of the oviec Union has
not progressed any
more than
2
percent annually for
the
past
rwo years or
2.
7
percent over
the past
IO
years.
J
use from
chat point of view, economic
growth
in
the ovier Union by
the year
2000
will put
the
country
in the
category of a
Third
World
country. The con-
sistent growth
in the West
in
electronics and computer
technology
has
actually sec the
Soviet Union back
by
ar
lease
10
years.
Without the
cechnological
leaps
chat the
West has made, the Soviet
nion eems co be fulling
further and further
behind.
It
is
with
this
concern
that
Gorbachev
has
taken
the
initia-
tive
co bring
around economic
reforms.
I
think in the long
run,
economic
,mprovemenc
will
mean
for the country a
higher standard of
living
and
greater availability of consumer
goods for the average citizen
than
he has
seen since
World
War
JI.
-At
the
27th
Party
Congress
in
1986,
Gorbachev
was primarily
concerned
with freeing 11p
the
econ-
omy.
But
at the most recent
Party
co11f
erence
(
in
J
11/y) he caiied
for
openness
in every part
of
society.
The resoiNtion
011
perestroika
approved by the
Party
conference
endorsed
these
changes.
ft
said:
"Revoiutionttry
perestroika
is
i,11po1Sibiewithout
invigorating in
every way the intellect11al
and
MARI T MAGAZINE

FALL
1988









































cultural
potential
of society."
HoUI
can
ro11um111ism,
which from 111y
experience
is funda111ental!y
repres-
Jive,
Jtifling
and
operates
effectively
only
1mdercemorJhip,
Jquare
with
thiJ call for
s11ch
openness?
ORKELJUNAS:
l
tbink
that
Gorbachev
really
doesn't indi-
cate a carte
blanc he
openness in
society,
doing away with
cen-
sorship.
It may be a
grand
kind
of proposal,
a
tremendous rev-
olutionary change
in that
sense.
But
1
don't
see a
leering
go of
censorship, or creating
an
envi-
ronment where the police
would live up
to
che Jeerer
of
the
oviet
onsticution, i.e.
complete
freedom
ofrhe
press.
For intellectuals, the reforms
are
doubtful
at this point,
although
that has been
estab-
lished verbally. Lip service has
been
given extensively
ae the
recent parry
conference,
but it
has yet co be realized. The
future will
tell
whether
they
will live up to it or not,
and
my
doub
is
based
upon my
hisrorical knowledge
of the
oviet
Union; it
will
not hap-
pen very readily
and
will not
be initiated
overnight.
The intellectuals have had
some
freedom co
discuss openly
various
aspects
of Stalin's
period,
aspects chat censorship
had long outlawed. True,
there is some republication
of
writers
who
have
been dissi-
dents in the
oviet Union, of
those
who were
ousted
by
force,
and the
publication of
a
number
of
writers whose works
could
not have been
published or
circulated
in the oviee
Union
before. This is very
positive.
Pasternak is being published,
Stalin is being
denounced.
Bue
at
the same time, this
area
of
freedom of
expression,
freedom
of
speech
and
freedom of
criticizing
the past, which has
been unknown in many
instances, is the least reliable
aspect of
whatever
conclusions
the
conference
drew
recently.
The more
important
aspect
co be looked
at
is the revitaliza-
tion
of
the
economy.
And in
that respect, the
great
reform,
or
cal
I it
a
revolution
that
really
has occurred, is the
recurn
to
apitalistic methods. The
greatest
revolution
is
the
acknowledgment
that the
com-
munist
system of economics
MARI T
MAGAZI
E

FALL
1988
has
failed
to
work.
Lenin
recog-
nized chat fact in 1921,
and
went
back ro
the
methods of
a
capitalized, planned economy
with profit
motive and
capitalist incentive,
to
some
extent.
That
same
thing has
occurred
now, how many years
down the road,
67 years?
or
in
67 years has the
subject even
been
broached.
Bur
the
decline
of agriculture
and
industry, the poor
quality
control,
the tremendous absen-
teeism from the job,
the
al-
coholism
which has
aggravated
absenteeism at
the
work place,
the perennial
lack
of being
able
to
feed the population for fail-
ing
to
grow enough food, the
fact
that the
country
is relying
on
foreign
imports, wheat,
grain, and
the
face that
it in-
vests
a great
deal in
foreign
rechnology, coo-all
of this
really has to
be
changed to
put
the Soviet
Union on firm
ground as a country
that is
developing
and
growing.
As it
stands
now, rhe
country
is stagnant and
regressive.
Economic initiatives
to do
away with central
planning
in
Moscow are
the
focal
point.
Regional
and
provincial
mana-
gers could
most
effectively
take
control of
their
own businesses,
of
their
own factories, of
their
own economic planning, so
that the productivity would
then rise,
and perhaps
the
oviec Union could at
lease
have
enough
time
to catch up
with the Western countries.
This
is
such
a
mind-boggling
event.
If
someone had
broached
this kind ofreality
in
the Soviet
Union
three
years ago,
ir would
have seemed impossible. All
these changes
began
in
May
1987
when the government
allowed
private ownership to
come
into its
own and allowed
small
private
service industries
to operate.
-When
I
WaJ
traveling through
Siberia laJt
year,
some
of
the
J,nall
train
statiom
that
we stopped
al
along the Trans-Siberian
line
would
be
crowded
with
local
farm
women
Jelling
homemade
pickles
from bucketJ
and
handf11ls
of Jmall
boiled
potatoes
1p,-inkled
with fresh
dill.
all
wrapped
11p
in a
sheet of
newJpaper.
ls
this
Jo111ething
new?
h
this
something
that I
would
not
have
seen
had
I
gone
therein 1986?
"T
his is
such
a
mind-boggling
event.
If
someone
had brocu:hed
this
kind
of
reality
in the
Soviet
Union three
years
ago it
'll'ould
have
seemed
imJ,ossible.
"
ORKELIUNAS:
lf
you
had
gone
there
before
May
1, 1987,
you
would nor
have seen rhac.
Maybe the
collective farm
workers or
farmers
would have
brought their
produce
to be
sold
at a
village or
a
town
market at
competitive prices-
food
that was
grown on their
quarter-acre
plots,
that
each
farmer
may
consider
as
his
own
to do with as
he wants.
That
was before
lase
year.
But
since
then, if
an
enterprising
young
fellow wanes co sell
cucumbers
or pickles or pickled
herring,
or
if he wants co sell shish
kebab
at
the
local train
stations,
which you
probably have seen,
and
I have
een,
too, he may
do
so
because
it
is now
private
enterprise that
the
government
endorses.
-I
want to
dimm
a
little
bit
about collectivization
and
the
co1111111miJt
ideal.
Everyone
iJ
mp-
posed
to
participate
and
Jhare
mpomibility, but in
,·eality
from
nty
experience
what
you get
is
that
nobody
is responsible.
And
111hen
that happem
everyo11e
becomes
rather
lazJ•
and
lackadaisical.
When I
was
living
in China
you
could wtdk
into the national bmik,
the Bank
of China, at the height
of
the
b11Ji11ess
day,
and
the,-e
would
be clerkJ with thei,· heads
daU1n
on
their de1k, half
asleep,
a11d
they
didn't
ct1re
whether
yo11
were
there
or
not,
so yo11
jmt
had
10
we1i1
11n1il
they woke 11p.
lt'.r
created
asyJ/e111
i11
China,
and
in
the
oviet
Union.
in
U1hicheveryo11e
getJ
111011ey
and food cmd Jhelter,
no 111<11/er
how
ha,-d they
work.
[!l
China
this
iJ
called
the ·•1
ro11
Rice
Bou./.
"
Y
011
J!.et
an i111t1ge
of a big
rice
bowl
that eve,-yo11eca11
eat
fro111.
l?ecemly
the
Chi11ese.
as yo11
know.
have tried
with Jome
s11cces.r
to
i11Jti/1
i11
people
the
idea of
individual
mpomibility.
The
go11em111en1
parceled
out
little
piew
of
land
10
the
far111ers
and
told
them,
..
You
grow what we,
the
govem111en1,
need.
and
then
t,fter
that
yo11
can do whatever
yo11
u
1
allt
with
the prod11ce.
·•
Lt
1110111d
seem
that the Soviet Union now haJ to
instill
in
people the dea
of
indi-
vidual
responsibility
to
get
people
in
asit11atio11
in
which
if
they
don't
work,
they
don't get
paid.
One
of
the
pa1-ty
resol11tio11J
said
the
idec.!
now was
to
mle
0111
a
possibility
of
living
a comfortable
life
while
doing shoddy
work.
Is
thiJ some-
thing
that iI goi11g
to
pervade the
wiet
Union?
If
Jomeo11e
iJ
not
doing
his job Ctm
he
get fired or
demoted?
A
re people 11ot
going
111
get
/1aid?
NORKELIU
A :
That's
what
the indicators are.
The
indi-
vidual
former,
now
operating
under these
new
guidelines of
perestroika,
has
been
al
lowed co
rent land from the
collective.
And
that's imporcanc because
those
private
plots seem to
be
set
up
as
they
are
in China,
as
you
mentioned.
ince
L933,
when talin
realized
rhat
his
collectivization was
a
coral
di
aster,
the
country
has
made
concessions
by
giving each
farmer,
each family,
a
small
plot of
land,
about a quarter
acre.
Today,
4
p
rcencofroral
arable
land
in the Soviet Union
is
privately owned.
And chat
4
percent
produces,
or
until re-
cently it
produced,
40
percent
of the
Soviet
Union's
coral
annual
agricultural
output.
So the idea then
comes
ro
Gorbachev's mind that if
you
allowed
people
co
rent
a large
parcel ofland from this
parricu-
lar
collective,
let's
say
IO
acres-I
think the
limit is
20
acres,
from
what
J have read
in
the Soviet papers
recently-
then that would
result
in
greater
producrivity, because
the
person
views the land
as
his
27

















































28
own. There is a
tremendous
profit motive in this, rremen-
dous
incentive,
not just ofown-
crship, and not just of making
a profit, but of management
too.
o collective
until
recently
has
been
given
the self-
dcterminarion
co manage its
own collective form. As
I
saiJ
earlier, everything
was directed
from Moscow's
central
plan-
ning. The assumption (under
communism)
is that everyone:
owns the land, but in reality
nobody owns it. A person
thinks,
"Jc's
nor
to
my direct
bencfi
t."
o rhe idea of
socialized ownership really has
bt:en
regressive.
ow you arc
going
to
see
greater
productivity because
people
are
thinking:
"This
is
my land,
1
own it. This is my
property, and not
ome
kind
of
a nebulous idea
of ownership,
that
'we'
own it, that ic's
the
'people's
land,·
it's the
'people's
industries,'
the
'people's
eco-
nomy."' You need rogcraway
from this colleccivized mass
mentality rhac rhe individual
does not
count,
that it is only
the mass
or
the collective
and
conform
icy chat count.
o much
credit has co be
given
co Gor-
bachev
for
recognizing chis
and
acting
on it.
He
i saying:
"This
is che time. This is che
eleventh
hour
to ace,
to
ac-
knowledge that we have
foiled,
that
our economy
has
foiled and
that the
capitalist
economy
does work
and
we mu r resort
co
capitalist
incentives." I
mean, ir
really
comes
right
down co that.
-/
wall/
lo pick 11p
1,11
the last
pcirt
of
that, that Gorbachev'J
mming tll'01111d
to
Jee
inf!,
that
ce,-1t1J11
ctSpects
of co1111111111im1.
that the icay
of
doi11f!,
thi11?,J,
hm,e1i'1
ll'orked.
It
111ml
,dmost seem
to the
cm11al
obJerver
of CL'e!IIJ
in the Soviet
Union thal Gorbachev
is
nmo11nr-
i11f!,
ro1111111mis111.
that
he hm
realized ii does 11111
ll'Ork.
cmmot
work.
a11d
he is
/IOU'
t11mh1f!,
to
market
forceJ of capi1ttlis111.
This
is like the U 11ited
Stale.i re1101111cing
the p11rs11it
of
happinm.
l-lou
1
iJ
the
al'er,1?,e r,11ie1
ci1ize11
rewnril-
i11g !Ylarxist
dogmm with
wpit;1/is111?
ORKELJU
1\,:
The
average
Russian person is
confused
by
all
of
the changes.
He is react-
( (
G
orhachez
·
is
say-
ini,
"This is the time.
This is the
elez
'enth
ho11r
to
mt, to
ctdmml'ledf!_e
thc1t
we hcnr:
fc,i!ed. thttt the
cc,pitcdist
economy
does u'ork.
··
ing in a
confused
way ro all the
changes
char
are caking place
because they
are
destroying all
of the
former
impressions
and
myths rhar he has developed
over
rhe years.
-J11Jeph
ta/in
is
11ou•
being
ffilicized
b;
the SovietJ
aJ
11e1•er
be/ore. cmd
Gorbt1che1•
haJ et•en
git-en
permission
fm· a
11101111111ml
~11
be b11i/1
i11 111e11101J'
of
S1a/i11"s
vic1i111s.
Calling 1alil1
to
task
im't neu·.
m
you knou·.
In
the
oviel
U 11io11.
Khmschev
said
11111ch
the
s<1111e
thing u•hen he
tl'a!
in pou'er.
He
11ei•er
did
a11ything
~wlmt
ii, 1ho11gh.
ou·
Gorbachei·
haJ
a111horized
the
constmctio11
of
thi1 111011111nent.
Some
of
the dissi-
dents, Solzheni1sy11
cm1011g
them.
JC/)'
tbC1t
Stalin
haJ
to
beco111pletelJ
p11rged
from
the
co1mlry
for
ii lo
move
f,11-ward.
There
has
to
be some
kind of c11/lec1ive
expression
of
redemption,
something
C1long
the
lines
of what is goillf!,
on
toda) ll'ith
secirchi11g
for c1zi war
criminals
and bringing
them lo triC1I,
cmd
p,miJhing tho,e who,u-eg11il1y.
Do
you
think th({/ the Soviet people
who
have demanded
s0111ething
be
do11e
and
u•h,,
haz•e
gotten
this 111on11111e111
h11ilt. r1ou•
see
this
as a sig11
to
co11ti1111e
[tmher
i11
seeking ,0111e
ki11d of
j11Jtice
fro111
the Sm•iet
Union in terms
of
u•hat ta/ill has
done
lo
lhf'ir
families?
ORKELIU
A
:
1
don't rhink
it is going to be a search
a
la
(Elie) Wiesel, let's say, co un-
cover
all of
the
Nazi
col-
laboracors in the Holocaust.
imply for this
reason:
The
conservative element
still holds
control today.
Ir
came
inro position under
talin's
reign,
under
calin's
rule. ta! in was the first one
to
introduce privileges for tho
e
who
are
loyal servants of the
party. He established rhar near
separate rate, in which
al-
legiance
co the party made
you
deserving. Thar
conservative
element
in rhe ovier Union
inherits chose
privileges.
ff
your father was an
important
parry member you will no
doubt
succeed
to
his position
after
his demise. You may nor
be a very inrelleccual person,
and nor have the intelligence
to
ger into
Moscow
niversiry,
bur because of
your
privileges,
you will be given
access
ro a
university over someone
el e
who has high scores on his
entrance exams.
In
orher
words,
it's an elite clas . And it's
hereditary.
o char
element
char i
giving
o much resis-
tance
to
Gorbachev today i the
old vanguard which was
ap-
poinred by ralin.
faybe the
original
ralin
appointee
or
supporter i either
retired
or
dead, but hi on has inherited
rhar position. And with those
privileges
come
rewards that
are commensurate
to the
cien-
rific, business and pol irical
community
reward in
our
country. They have
everything
they wane. If rhey want ro visit
France on ome political or
cientific mi sion, they vi it
France and they bring home the
goods
they want-the
con-
A
sign of
the
times.
sumer goods,
the car
-and
nobody questions
them.
They
can just bring it all home.
Arc they
going
to go our and
hunt
down
rhe resr
of
rhem,
hunt their own kind down,
while they themselves are still
entrenched
there:' Thar's
really
the problem, as you
have
read.
--Gorharhez,
1111(!!
be
a11a1he111a
to
a great
many people
111
theestablish-
111e11t.
/1
thal
ll'here
he
IJ 1me1ing-
or
iJ
going
to 111ee1-111ost
of
his
resistance?
You 111e11tioned
that
people
get
i1111w/11ced
11110
these
positiom
of
po!l'er 1ha1
,,re
heredi-
ltllJ',
and
111
" ro,mtr;
like the
oviet
U11io11.
m
111
Chint1. it'J
111ore
poli1ical poll'er 1ha11
111011ey
tht11 iJ the legal tender i11
sode1y.
that
gets yo11
ll'hal yo11
U'a111.
A
11d
Gorbachei•
Jee111J
lo
be
1hre,11eni11f!,
1his,
and
that he is 1111:e/111?,
most
of
his
wis1a11re
11'ithi11
his 011•11
ranks.
'ORKELI
A :
Thar's right.
You have
to
conclude
rhac.
Because ir is these rank that
are rhe major
armie of
mana-
gers and
bureaucrat . And it is
this slab of rone,
really,
that
is rhe backbone of the parry
power el ire.
Ir
is rhey rhar hold
the power,
and
they would
be
che
greatest
obstacle ro Gor-
bachev.
Let me just add omerhing
el
e
because it just
c
urred
to
me. Gorbachev has
got
to
be
genuine
becau
e
he is placing
himself, even his own country,
in a position of such danger.
oronly could all of
his
reforms
be swept away if people don
·c
support him,
if
people in rhe
parry don't upporr him, bur
I
think
it could even be a threat
ro his life in the long run.
MARI
T
1AGAZINE

FALL
1988







































There
are a
number
of things
thar
show evidence to support
the conclusion
rhar
he
is
genuine, and
nor just
biding
rime
ro catch
up with America
and
its technology
and ro pur-
sue
world
communism,
world
conque t, again.
-Former
President
ixon hm
said
i11
his most recent book
that
the Sovie/ U11io11
is imtit11ting
these
chtwges in order to become
a more
powerful nation am/ thm
i11
a
better
/1ositio11
to take over
the
u111rld.
Or,
i11
the
Marxist
ter-
11tinology,
to liberale the
world.
And J'/111
yo,melf sctid b,1rk i11
1985 that revol11tio11izi11g
the
ll'odd far co1m111mis111
is
the
first
rmd foremost
1ho11gh1
of Soviet
leaden.
ORKELIU
AS:
I
made
a mis-
take as far as
Gorbachev
is
concerned.
As
far as rhe ochers
go-the
priorities of orher
leaders
from
Chernenko to
Kosygin
and ro
Brezhnev-that
was
the point.
-So
i11
the
three
yean
si11ce
C
nr-
bachev
hr1s
been i11
PIJll'l!r.
yo11
have
had a rethi11ki11f!,
abo11t
this
11um,
abo111
u•hal his
goals
are.
ORKELIUNAS:
Right. Just
talking ro
you
roday has made
some of these rhings comt: out.
I
mean,
ifhe
were not
genuine,
would he
pit
himself
against
the
overwhelming odds of con-
servatism
wirhin his
own parry?
-\Yle/1.
yes /!,fnt1i11e.
bflt
gm11ine
i11
tenm o/looki11g
0111
Jo,·
the
Soviet
U11io11,
and world expa11si1m.
NORKELIUNAS: Well,
let's
put
it this way:
It's
hard co
say
because it will
take
them
some-
time ro
achieve
pariry with us,
nor in
arms
buc
in quality of
life
and communications
technology.
Ir
will
take
them
rime to
achieve
this.
J
would
say at
least
20 years.
-OK. 20
years
is good, becaHse
1
wa11t
to
ask yo"
something
that
is
related
to
the
20
years here.
I
want
to
re,1d
you
a sho-rt
state111en1
by
,1
Soviet diJSident who
now lives in
the
United States,
Vladimir
Buko11Jky.
He
said:
''The
Soviet
U11ion
is
in rapid
decline.
The
decline can be
slowed
down
i11 the
hope
thc1t
something
will happen
011
MARIST MAGAZINE•
FALL 1988
the way. b111
it camwt be stopped.
If
radical refonm are not 111ade.
1he
system
has aboflt
20
years he/ore
it
1111ravels
and
the
empire
cr11111-
bles.
··
Has
Gorbc1che1•
had a
simi-
lar
vision?
ORKELIU
A :
He has ver-
balized that
as fact,
but not
the
time
period, not the 20 years.
Jc
is
only a call ro immediacy,
a if to say,
"Right
now,
we
can't wait comrades,
we
can't
wair."
You
know
rhar phrase,
we
can't
wait. No rime
ro
wait,
do
it
now. Bur it has not
been
stared
in
terms of a
threat, that
rhey are
in
danger of being
overrun by capitalism or
what-
not. But
Gorbachev is stating
char
rhey
should
resort
co
new
methods, capitalist
methods
at
that.
If
they work,
they
are
acceptable. Update.
Modern-
ize. That's
what
they
ay.
They
don't say that we should
capitalize.
They
say modernize,
modernize rhe economic sysrem
on
the
standards that exist, char
have proved successful in
the
rest of rhe world roday.
-Wihatab11111freedo111oftheprm?
ORKELIU,
AS:
I
think
the
most
radical change
has
been
freedom of the press. Everybody
is reading.
Everybody is ex-
cited.
l
watched
television
a
few moments that
I
could
in
rhc afternoon (during the
Party
co~ference). Everybody is
de-
bating.
Once
about
300
mana-
gers from various factories
were
debating on
what
would be rhe
most
effective
way to
initiate
local factory planning.
They
were all discussing
it,
and some
werealmosr in tears,
as
rhough
rhey were
conrri re,
because
they had done
something
wrong in the
past.
It
was
like
a public examination
of one's
conscience.
-11 JeemJ
like
floodgates
have bee,i
opened i11 that co1111try.
that
!here
we1·ea
/01
of repressed
energies,
rmd
a
lot
of repressed
desires. and 11011•
ail of a s11dden
theJ have bee11
sanctioned
and people
are jmt
going
wild criticizing left and
right,
writing
letten
Jaying
thingJ that
they
never
would have said before.
People
no11
1
are
gropi11gforpositiom
of power.
even
by p11blicly
deno1111r-
i11g
colleag11eJ.
Is
that
the impres-
s
ion th<tt
yo11
gel_;,
ORKELIUNA :
Yes,
yes.
What
you said in
the
beginning
is very
accurate.
They
don't
know
whar ro do
with
them-
selves, now
that they have this
freedom.
You
can't dispute
this
relief. When
a
Russian
writes,
he
chinks, even subconsciously,
about
whar not
to say,
in
case
somebody confiscares
what he
wrote. Now that they have
rhis
freedom, they're all confu ed.
A
reporter
might
ask ques-
tions
of a passerby on
the
streec,
and a
Russian
might walk up
to
the reporter
and say, "Whar
are you doing)"
And
someone
sranding
nexr
ro
the reporter,
maybe
even a
policeman,
mighr
say, "Hey, haven't you
heard'
lt'sy,lasnost
now. Reporter
are
allowed to interview
passersby
on
the
street."
But
ro rh is
fellow who has
been con-
ditioned to chink
in
a certain
way, he would say
to
himself,
"What
happened'"
It
is
psychological, what
is
happen-
ing.
Ir's
a shock.
It's
a tremen-
dous shock.
-Whal
do
yo11
think
your s111den1s
gained
f,-0111
thiJ
1rifi
10 the
wiel
U11ion?
ORKEUU Ac:
Mose
of chem
were
initiated
in
some
back-
ground of
Russia,
either in rhe
course of
Russian
culture, or
oviec
history
or
Russian
his-
tory.
Those
who
had
some
initiation
wt:re
able to notice
"G
orhcuhez,
hc,s go/
to
be ge1111i11e
berc111se
he
is placing
himself ez
e11
his
m1111!1J.
in ct
positio11
of
t.f?tnger."
acriviries around
rhem,
to
see
what was
happening
around
them, ,111d interpret the ac-
ti
vi
ries in
a
more
reasonable
way. Those-,,ind
these
were
rhe minoriry-who
were
there
or were exposed co oviet
I ife
for the firsr
time had
some
lessons
to
learn.
Some
com-
menced
that the food we were
eating in
the hotels
was terrible
and
that the people who
h,
ve
ro car this food must surely be
dissarisfied.
Bur
the food chat
\ve
were eating only rhe
party
elite was
allowed
ro
have. So I
said ro a couple of chem,
"Go
our
in
to rhe
vcgerab le
scores
and
mear
stores and see what
you can find."
And they
forged
our on their own, and one
student said
there was
norh ing
rhere
but
some
wilred
carrots,
that
he
didn't see any meat,
that rherc wasn't
meat
rhac we
would call mt:at,
that there
were only chicken
heads. Before
rhac
rhcse
people had no com-
prehension of
chis
because
they
were isohtted in
rhe
hotels.
When I was
there
I
was
eating
this
wonderful food and chok-
ing
on
it,
because
J
knew
clwr
our
in
che ciry they had
no-
thing, they
weren't
earing
anything,
they
wt:rt: going
across town to rhe ocher side of
Moscow,
which
probably rook
chem
two
hours
co get there
afcer
chcy heard char
there was
some
meat, that
meat was
<lei ivered somewhere.
-\Y'h(lt
would m, A111erict111
touriJt
going
th1:re
today
see
tht1t
he u•ould not hm•e
seen
lll'O
ye<1rs
<11!,11.'
W'hal i;
1101
there thr1t he
would hm,e
Jtell
111·0
yean
r1g11.,
NORKELI
AS:
Well,
I
chink
the Soviet people
would nor
walk
away from him
ifhe wanted
co
talk to
them. People
come up
to
you, and you comt:
up
to
people, and you can openly
discuss something on rhe street.
Thar's
one of rht: most
unusual
things.
You
can
di
cuss rhings
wich
your guides.
In
fact, your
guide bring our questions that
would never have
been discussed
before.

Editor'; 11r,t,:
Dr.
C,1Si111ir
11rkdii111m
is plt11111i11g
to take
t11101h.1·
group
to the Swi/JJ
Union early
11exl
yMr.
Th1Jse
interested
in
the
tour
can rn11/<1cl
hi111
at /\larfrt C11/lege.
29
























The Cutting
Edge
Fashion Program at Marist moves ahead with top designers
Wini
lT
E
ROLLME T
TRTPLI Gand rop-rated design-
ers coming on board as advisors,
the
Fashion
Program
at Marisc
seems
to
be moving
right
co the
curring edge of fashion educa-
tion in
the
country.
lt is a
move
char
has
taken
less than rwo year
,
due co rhe
hard
work of
the
program·s
students, faculty, industry
advi orsand, mo rofall,
Direc-
tor Carmine
Porcelli.
Ir i
Por-
celli ·s experience,
vision
and
drive
char have fueled rhe pro-
gram's remarkable growth.
A
20-year veteran of rhe
fashion industry in
New
York
i ry,
Porcelli
was
Oscar
de
la
R
ma's sporrswear
designer
for
seven of
those
years.
Following
that, he
was
the
managing
director and president of
Albert
Capraro, Led.
His
clients in-
cluded former First
Lady Betty
Ford during her
White
House
years.
Looking
for a change from
what had become for him che
rat
race
of the business world,
Porcelli
left
ew York in
1985
and
moved
to
the Hudson
Valley.
His enjoyment of hav-
ing nothing
to
do
but
relax
lasted, by
his
own account,
about an hour.
"It
was
then
rhac
!
started ro panic," he said.
"l
remembered
chat a year or
so before,
I
had been
in
an
antique store
in
cone
Ridge,
(N.Y.),
and the owner
had
asked me
if I knew
of anyone
who
would
want
to
reach fash-
ion design
at
Marisc College.
l
rold
him no, I
couldn't think
ofanyone. Frankly,
I
was think
ing
why
would someone
in
the
fashion industry
in New Yor
wane
to
leave the
city to
teac
fashion
design
in
Poughkeep-
sie.
Well,
a year later chat
someone
was me.
Porcelli
telephoned the Fas
ion Program
at Marist, and wa
hired as a pare-rime faculty
I,,
DEStG
ERS
Bill Blass, Marc Jacobs, Mary Mcfadden
a11d
Oscar
de la
Rema
u-ere
the
designer-critics
for the 1988
Fashion
Program
al
Marist
College. Each of
the
designers
worked
with
Mm·iJt
Jtttdents
from
the
earliest
stages of
their
projects
through
the
actual comt-mction
of the garments.
As the
mLmination
of the year's W{Jrk.
each of the designers
selected
a st11dent
to
receive
a
Silver eedle Award.
The recipient
of both the
Bill Blass
and
Oscar
de
la Renta
Silver
eedle
Awards
was
Stephanie Rose.
Pict1tred
below
iJ
the sketch and the actual annent designed by
Ms. Rose,
selected
for a Silver
eedle by
Bill Blass.
member in the
fall of
I
986.
A
year
lacer, he
became
the
direc-
ror of
the program,
and its
transformation
began.
"The
Fashion Program had
been
a very
low-key program
and
there was no involvement
from the
fashion industry,"
Porcelli
said.
"I
began
working
ro
change
rhat,
and
we've
been
incredibly
successful in getting
the cooperation
of
outstanding
people in
the indu try. We've
been
able
to
combine the talent
and experience of designers
who have made
it
in the real
world
of Seventh
Avenue,"
he
said.
Among the
designers
who
have played
an
integral part
in
the
Fashion Program
ac arise
are
Bill Blass, Mary McFadden,
Oscar de la Rema, Marc Jacobs,
Richard Assady
and the late
Willi
mith
.
.And they have
liked what they've
seen.
"These were the best l've
seen of any group of students
I've worked with,"
said
McFad-
den
commencing co a
reporter
on the work of lase spring's
seniors.
"I
don't
know
what
goes
into the program but it's
amazing. From
beginning co
end
I
saw
such
a vase
improve-
ment, it was very impressive.
Blass
compared
the work
of
Marisc's
students favorably
with that being produced at
much
larger,
more
established
fashion design
programs.
Jacob
,
last
year'
winner
of
the
prestigious Perry
Ellis
Award,
said about the students
at
Marist:
"Great.
trong. They
got excited about
their
projecrs.
Jr's one thing
to draw
pretty
pictures.
They made
them
come alive."
Blass, McFadden, Jacobs
and
de
la
Rema served
as crea-
tive
advisors
to
the
students
during the past
academic
year,
reviewing their work from
its
earliest sketches
through the

























urr
l_
hese were
the
best
I've
seen of any group of stlidents
I've
worked with
. . . I
don't know
what goes into the program ctt
Marist, but it's amazing."
-
Designer Mary McFadden
actual construction
of the gar-
ments. Blass, Assacly
and
Smith had
been
the
advisor for
the
previous year.
Students
meet with
the de-
signers in their
workshops in
New York
City, gecring first-
hand
advice and constructive
criticism on
their
projects.
The
designers also serve as the critics
for
Marist's
Silver
eedle com-
petition,
in which
a design
is
elected by each of the designers
for a
Silver
eedle
Award
in
his
or
her name.
The
l
988
ilver
eedle awards were pre-
sented
in April
at a gala fashion
show
held
at the
Wyndham
Hotel in Poughkeepsie.
"Fashion
creativity i
ome-
thing
which
is difficult ro teach
in a classroom and
impossible
ro
learn
from books," said
Por-
celli.
"You
have
to
see fashion
again and again, and meet
people who
are
working in
the
industry ro understand what i
involved,
what
i going
to be
expected of you.
We have
been
One
of
the
most exciting aspem of
the
Fashion
Program
at
i\!Ja,·ist
is that
students have the oppor11111ity
to
learn
from the experts.
OeJigner Mary
McFadden ( abQve) /I/eels with
Marist
st11dents
in her ew York CitJ•
ll'Orkshop.
At right
Me1rc
jt1Cobs
offel'S constr11ctive
advice
011
a design by
Jessica Panduro.
Desiguer
Mt1rc
}t1cobs
selwed
this
work by
Stll{lwt
Doree11
Bond
fm·
his Silver
eedle
Au•,ml.
forcunare here at Marist.
Our
prox1m1ty
to
ew
York
icy
and our link with some of
the
rop designers in
the
business
have
enabled students to work
with some of the very best
talent
in the
fashion industry.··
Another imporcanr
addition
co
the
program
has
been an
advisory board of
industry rep-
re
enratives ro
review
and offer
suggestions on the program's
overall direction. That ongoing
board includes Etta Froio, vice
president and fashion director
of
Wnme,i's
\\1/ear
Daily;
Alan
Grossman,
vice president and
merchandising manager of ak
Fifth Avenue; Mary McFadden,
Mary McFadden, Inc.; Allen
Mc
eary, president of Liz
Claiborne,
Jnc.;
onnyMoorc,
fashion direccor of
Ce11tle111en·s
Q11,trterly;
and Gerald
haw,
president of
Oscar de la Renea,
Jnc.
"We
want ro make certain
that what
we
are tcachi ng is as
up-ro-date as possible,"
Poree
I Ii
Car111i11e
Porcelli. director
n/
the
F<1shio11
Program
at
/\1,ll'ist si11ce
the
fill/
nf
1987.
is
ti
20-year
11el-
e,m1
of
the fashion i11dmtry.



























32
H
[t's
one thing to draw pretty pictures.
Marist students made them come alive."
-
Designer Marc
Jacobs
said.
"We
wane
our graduates
to have those skills that the
industry is I oking for. Our
advisory
board
gives
us
a
direct
exposure to and involvement
with the
fashion
industry
that
would be difficult to match."
These
connections
with
the
fashion
industry have been very
useful in helping to place stu-
dents once
they have
completed
their degrees. Graduates have
been interviewing with
several
of
the
top design firms in New
York. Silver
eedle Award
recipient
rephanie Rose re-
cently
was
offered a position by
Liz Claiborne, Inc.
And
what about
Porcelli
himself, designer
and
businessman turned reacher?"
I
consider
myself
one
of the really
lucky
people
in chis world,
to
have
found a
whole new
career
at
mid-life," he
said.
"I
have
found a
niche that suits me.
It
is
a
place
where
I
can give
generously
of my
experience
and get
new
insights and
the
exuberance of
youth in return.
These
young
people will then
give
back to the
fashion indus-
cry what they
learn
here. It's
a
very productive circle."

Designer Marc Jacobs
confers
with st11dent
tepha11ie
Rose. Rose.
a
l
987
and
19
8
Silver
eedle A ward
recipient, has
been oflered
a
position
with
Liz
Claiborne.
Inc.
NARL
Y
60
DIFFER£
1'
DESJG
S
were prese111ed
al
the
1988
ilver
eedle
Fashion how
sponsored
by Maris!
College. The
gala event
included fall,
wi111er,
s11111111er
and
resort
collections
designed
by st11dmts
in the fashion program. A
selection
is
pictured beloll'.
MARIST MAGAZI E

FALL
l988


























The author standing in
the
d{)()f
of the bedr()(}m
he
and his wife liwd in at
their
Chinese
1111de's
house in
Beijing.
At home abroad;
living in
China
~Jam~~,lland~
I
do nothing to remembe,·
Bm
I
cam10I
forget
-Su
hih
(Sung
Dynasty,
960-1279)
"Y
OU HAV ·TORE-
MEMBER,"
my Uncle
Wang
Chen was
whispering to
me
in
English, "that the universities
in China
are
ruled with
an
iron
fist."
He
made
a fist and held
it up.
It was
my
first morning in
China.
It
was wincer and to stay
warm
my
wife
Wanda
and
I,
and U
nde Wang Chen,
a soft-
spoken, stooping man of
70;
his
daughter
Wang Hua,
ashy
woman of49; and
her
husband,
Li Chen,
a rather boisterous
man of 50, were huddling
around
a coal srove in
the
sit-
James Kullander
is assistant direc-
tor of public relatiom at Maris!
and managing editor
of
Marist
Magazine.
MARI T MAGAZI
E

FALL
1988
cing room of their old courtyard
home
in
Beijing. The house,
in
addition to
the
university where
we
would be teaching
English,
would
be
our
home
for
the next
18
months. And
in this time
we would learn chat
not
only
are
schools
ruled with
an
iron
fist, but al o just about every-
thing
else
in China. We
would
learn
how heavy China's long
and torturous
history weighs
upon her
people,
how
life
is
a
struggle against
monstrous
odds as young and old alike try
to recover from past revolution-
ary excesses and
to
cope with
the meddlesome
bureaucratic
forces that
rule
the country
now. We would
find a
China
vastly different
from the
ancient
mythical
one we
picture in
our
minds
or the
rapidly
progress-
ing one
depicted
in our
news-
papers and on television.
My residence
in
Beijing-
from the
winterof 1986 to the
fall of last year-really
begins
four years ago.
That
was when
I married
a
Chinese-American
and began a kind of odyssey
inro the
lives
of
the Chinese.
Although Wanda's
mother's
family-who
had
come
from
hanghai-is
living
in
the
United
Scates now, Wanda's
father-who
was born in Bei-
jing-has
an
older brother still
living
in
Beijing. for
years
there had been
a standing
invi-
tation
for us to stay with
him
in
his home.
At
a family picnic the sum-
mer
of 1985
we
spoke
with
a
family friend
who had recently
returned from
a year of teaching
English in
Beijing.
uddenly-
as
if we'd known
all along
but
were
only
now reminded
of
it-we
decided we would do
the same.
Wanda's
father
agreed
to write
co
his
brother
to
help
us
find work there. No
teaching
experience was
re-
quired
(we
prepared
on
the
plane trip),
but
with
my
educa-
tion in
journalism and my
experience
in writing I
felt
comfortable with the
idea
of
taking on the
role
of an English
instructor. Wanda,
an illus-
trator, was even
less prepared.
But teaching
or writing experi-
ence was not as important, we
would
learn,
as was patience
and endurance
to
adapt co a
strange and taxing country.
The
school was
modern
by
Chinese
standards and,
like
most
contemporary Chinese
architecture, utilitarian co a
fault.
We lived
and ate in a
rectangular
red brick
and ce-
ment, four-story dormi rory
with
eight other
American
teachers and several foreign
students.
This is
a typical ar-
rangement in
China-foreign
residents and travelers are in-
<!
variably separated
from
the
~
Chinese.
China has
long feared
~
and resented certain
Western
~
influences, and
in
some cases
~
rightly
so.
The
present govern-
ment
wanes to concrnl how
much
exposure
tO
Wesrerners
the
Chinese have
in an effort
to
curb
their
individual wanes.
The present fear in
higher
Com-
munist
Party
echelons-the
fear of democracy-is
as strong
as any in che past.
During
che
I
986/87 campaign against
"bourgeois
liberalization" (a
governmental
reaction tow ide-
spread student protests then),
a
nationwide decree
ordered
every
college
in China
to
keep
a record of every
Chinese
setting
foot in a
residence
of foreigners.
Foreign
teachers,
however,
could al
ways
wander freely
into
the student
dormitories,
and
that's what
I
did.
The
places
are crowded,
usually
four
co
a
room the
size of a common
double
in
an
American
college
dormitory.
The floors
and walls
are
bare
cement.
Dim
fluores-
cent lights
flicker
and
hot
run-
ning wacer does nor exist.
The
srudencs color
their
walls with
posters
of
Chinese movie
scars
and starlets, and scenic pictures
of the
Yellow River,
the tone
Forest
or
the
famous,
misty
mountains ofGuilin.
ome
had
large maps of the United
Scates,
where
my
students-graduate
English
majors
and docroral
candidates
in the
sciences-
dreamed
of
visiting,
studying
or even living.
One's
privacy in
these
dormitory rooms is
limited,
however,
so when you
wanted to talk about personal



































34
affairs you went
outside
and
walked.
This
was
how l heard
my tudencs'
scories
about their
cormenred lives during the
Cultural
Revolution
(
1966-
76),
their
roblems now (which
go
back
co the revolution and
further),
and
of their attempts
cogoabroad.
Almo revery on-
versarion
J
had eemed
ro
be
colored
with a fateful sadness
which no comforting words
from me nor even the highest
hopes they were
able
to muster
could
relieve.
There was always that one
thing-chat
inescapable web of
rhe past and totalitarian
med-
dling-which
spoke to them,
haunted chem, with rhe mes-
sage rhac I ife is not supposed to
be easy nor
good,
that you
should not dare to
expect
so
much, co
change
the Will
of
Heaven for
your
own per onal
advantage.
1
could
see it in my
student
· eye ;
a distant and
forlorn
gaze came
over chem
whenever we spoke about their
crying to get more from life
than they, because of
chis
con-
dicioni ng, imagined possible.
Communism,
it
·eemed
co me,
had not thrown off the hackles
of feudalism, as they say; it
inscicucionalized it.
o hinese
citizen
is freer move from
one
job co another
or
from one
ci
cy
ro
another
without
official
approval, and official approval
comes
only after one has
cor-
reccly
played his pare
and
plant-
ed a few
well-placed bribe .
The job you
are assigned after
school is the job you will most
likely have until
you
retire,
where you
are
b
rn
is
mosc
I
ikely rhe place where you will
die. An official file is main-
tained on
every
hinese from
the age of
18,
and it follows
him throughout his
I
ife,
"black
marks" and all. Even if you
should only fall out
of
favor
with the one in control of your
file--rhe
ommunist
Parry
secretary of your college depart-
ment or work unit-you
will
somehow
earn
yourself
a
black
mark. Promotions,
achan e
co
study abroad,
or even
getting
a room of one's own or a
good
qualiry bicycle,
are all
weighed
against one's file. le is
a
face
from which
every
hinese
[
mer
wanted to
escape,
but could not.
One
graduating
student
of
mine who had
all
bur pleaded
"O
nee I
showed
Wang H11a
an old
postage
stamp of
Chairman Mao.
"I
don't
want to see
that '
she sai.d.
with school
officials
co have his
work assignment changed co
Beijing from the less desirable
city of
Xian was cold, in
effect:
"You
are
lucky
co
have
even
gotten
co
college.
(Only
6
percent of rhe Chinese popu la-
c
ion is
able
co
go
co
college.)
Think
of all
chose who will
never
go
co college. Think
of
all
chose who during rhe Cul-
tural Revolution were sent
to
rhe desert
and
still haven't been
allowed
co
come
home. You
have it pretty
good here, and
have no right
co
complain."
Eventually he
gave
up.
'Tit
just
go
co
Xian and then cry co
go
co America
and
maybe never
come
back," he cold me.
In
his
desperation he
seemed
co have
clearly seen that in China there
will
always
be hundreds of
million
who will be far less
forrunace than any one indi-
vidual seeking
greater
opporru-
nity
for
him or herself.
ln
a
country
which belittles indi-
vidual initiative
as
selfish arro-
gance
and organizes itself under
the
forces
of egalitarianism char
drag
one
down rather than life
one
up, the re ult is chat few
will
ever
realize their hopes
or
desire .
Wanda
and
I
spent
our
weekends
and occasional
week
nights
at our
uncle's house.
The h u
e
its in che heart
of
a
vase, tumble-down
and confus-
ing neighborhood
of old
homes
and
shops.
nc le Wang Chen,
Wang Hua
and
Li Chen live in
this old place rogecher. Another
Chinese cousin
of
ours, who
would be
a
little
younger
than
his sister, had killed him
elfin
1966
at the beginning of the
Cultural Revolution rather
than face the humiliation
of
a
public
inrerrogation--or
a
"struggle
session,"
as
it was
then known-in
which he was
co confess his supposed
crimes
against
the revolution. Our
hinese
aunc
had died
in
1980
from cancer brought
on
by,
ncle Wang Chen is
convinced
co
this day,
the inner curmoil
caused by years of revolutionary
chaos.
Uncle Wang Chen him-
self had spent
seven
years oft he
revolution in
rhe counrryside,
like millions
ofocher
inrelleccu-
als, getting
some
kind of
re-
educarion
from peasants. He
showed me the welt he'd
gotten
on
his right shoulder from
carrying
buckets
of
water
on a
pole. Wang Hua had been
a
nurse in
a village
in the We t-
ern
Hills
outside of
Beijing
trying
ro
cure
ills and wounds
rhat no medicine
could
treat,
and
the
experience
seems
co
have marked her. Once when
J
howed her an
old postage
scamp of Chairman Mao
I'd
purchased as a
souvenir,
she
winced
and snapped,
"I
don't
wane ro see rhac.
f
don't
like
chat," and picked up
a
broom
and
scarred mindlessly
sweep-
ing the floor.
W
hac remains
of the
house
is
what remains of most old
house in pose-revolutionary
Beijing. le is
adilapidared
shell
wirh makeshift
repairs,
and
mosc of the
antiquities
char had
been in ic had been
either
de-
stroyed by revolutionary Red
Guards or
taken
and never
returned. ln Chinese
such a
house i
called a
si
he
Jlfttlll,
a
four-walled garden.
To me ir
was
like
a chest of
silent
memorie
.
fn chis house,
life
outs
id
nd
che
I
ife
l
had
long
been
familiar
with-al-
ways seemed so
far away.
It faded by degrees. Leaving
the wide and crowded avenues
and rurning down
the local
lane, neighbors wOLdd
care ac
me,
an
obvious foreigner,
as
I
made my way down
a
route few
foreigners
ever
found reason co
cake.
l knew they were curiou
,
if not suspicious. Our
staying
there was so unusual chat when
our family had registered us
wich
China's Bureau
of
Public
ecuriry, as
was
required
of
chem, rhe three young police
officers
behind the dia didn't
know
what che proJ
er
proce-
dure mighr be. And sometime
lacer,
Li Chen had politely cold
us
we would have co scare re-
ceiving our
mail from home
at
the school instead of his house
for
fear
of
having his house
searched by Public
ecuriry ro
investigate the extent
and
sig-
nificance
of
his
overseas connec-
tion
All of this was very strange
co
me.
1n
face, the longer
I
stayed
in
China
and
the morel
learned
abour
rhe
country
the
stranger rhe place became. And
all of this
strangeness was
a
background of increasing den-
sity
each
rime
I
arrived at
the
house.
And
each time
l
had
a
feeling char was not clear co me
for a long
time.
Eventually,
from my daily
conversations
with my scudenrs
ar
school,
and
from
absorbing
more
and
more
of che I
ife
of
my
Chinese
family
in their house,
1
discerned
in
chat courtyard
a
deep
and
unchanging
force
governing
everything that
existed
in chat
country, a cer-
rain
kind of
gravity,
or inertia,
that made me realize in the
end
chat, des pi re
all
rhe outward
and oursized
changes China has
and
would put
on,
the
country
has been and always will be
cursed
wirh rhe vast and unseen
power of a
historical narrative
woven with
alternating colors
of chaos and oppre
sion. And
this history informs the
present
and speaks ro
the future more
chan we in
our
young
and
indul-
gent country can
truly
ever
know.
I
remember
a
pair
of
old,
small
scone lions-who
e
heads
had been smashed by Red
Guards-standing
outside che
courtyard
door
of
ncle Wang
hen's house,
and
ro me they
area ymbol
of the till ruinous
care of China. There is no
celling
if
another
ulrural Rev-
olution
wilJ happen in China,
but
one
thing is
certain:
No
one
there will
ever forget.

MARIST MA AZI E

FALL
1988




































C
OMME
TC
EM E
T
1
9
8 8
Vietnamese
boat person
recounts
her harrowing
journey
to America
Vu Thanh Thuy urges 1988 Marist graduates
to make the world a better one
Vu Thanh Thuy,
a former
Vietnamese boat person
and
mr-
rently
a jo11rnaliJI
and
leader
in
an
organization which
helps
rescue
So111heast
Asian reji,gees
adrift at
sea, gave
the
keynote address at
Marist College's
42nd commence-
ment
exe,·cises
011
May
2
I
before
approximately
500 grad11ates
and
their parents
and
friends in the
McCann Cente,-. Vu, the
Rev.
Tei-ence
Attridge,
founde,· tmd
director
of
the S11b1tance
Abuse
MinisllJ'
of
the
ew
York Arch-
diocese,
and
Floyd Pattmon,
forme,·
Heavyweight Champion
of
the Wodd
and
n(JU1
a
prominent
youth worker,
received
honorary
Doctor
of
H
mnane Lette,·s
degrees.
Vt1
received
a standing ovation
following a
half-hour
speech
about
her
life in
011th
Vietnam,
her
escape
from that
country after
ii!
fall to
the Comm1tnists,
and
her life
here in the United tat
es.
Excerpts
from
V11's
speech
appeared
the
day
after
the
commencement
in
The
New York Times
and in
thej1111e
13
Time
magazine.
Maris!
was
one of only a
total
of 24 colleges
tmd
universities
nationwide
to
have
their
commencement
speake,·s
q1101ed
in
the
magazine's
special section.
Vu
was also fealt1red in
the
June
2
Catholic
ew
York
weekly
newspape,·.
Also,
an
ABC
20120
program
on
Vu
and
her resme
work
was broadct.st
Augmt
5.
The
following
is
a complete
transcript
of
V11's
keynote addren, which
is
entitled
"Sm'Vival,
tmggle and
Commencement."
I
AM VERY GRATEFUL To
MARJST 0LLEGE for
the
privilege of sharing. with you
this special day.
I
feel very
MARI
T
MA
AZINE

FALL
1988
Vu Thanh Th11y
with
her baby daughter, Tra11g-Th11.
honored
and
very humbled by
your invitation to be a part of
your commencement,
and 1
would like
to
offer
my
heartfelt
congratulations
to
the
graduates and
their families.
This country opened irs
doors to us; it has been our
refuge
since
1980,
and we have
become
a
parr
of
it.
Ir
is truly
a land of possibilities,
a
land
chat
can
welcome the stranger
to irs
midst,
as
you have today,
and offer such warmth,
accep-
tance and hope.
1
can better
understand now why
this
coun-
cry has been
called
a
"perma-
nently unfinished" society, so
open and
free, and with an
unmatched
capacity
to absorb
immigrants and
refugees
from
all
over the world.
Today I would like to share
with you my personal
experi-
ences from Vietnam to
America. Although it is
one
person's story, it is fairly typical
of
refugees from Vietnam who
escaped
by boat
after the fall of
Saigon in
1975. le
is a story of
survival and struggle, and a
story of
commencement-of
starting
life
all over
again
in
a
strange country.
1
was a war correspondent
in
Vietnam.
I
covered the In-
dochina War at
the
front lines
in Vietnam and Cambodia. Jn
1970,
at the age
of
20, I
was
awarded
the
Silver Star for
valor. Bue
1
knew nothing then
of true courage.
In
1972,
I
met
my
husband
while at the fronr, walking on
the
ruins
of
che
city
ofQuang-
Tri
along
the
"Boulevard
of
Horror," with thousands of
decomposed bodies
all
around
us. But
I
knew little yet of
irony or faith.
In
April
1975,
just before
the fall
of
South Vietnam,
I
was
in a aigon hospital giving
bi
rrh
to
our first baby,
helplessly
listening
to the rush
of events on the radio and the
desperate goodbyes of
my
fam-
ily and friends.
One
week later,
on
May
4,
my
husband and
I
left
Vietnam
with the rest of
my extended family of
30
people
on
a boar. We were
among rhe very first boat people
in the history of
the
Vietnamese
35
































36
exodus,
fleeing
our
homeland
with
hopes
of being picked
up
by
the American
Seventh Fleet
waiting
along the coast of South
Vietnam. After three
days
at
sea, due
co
the
p
or
sanitation
conditions on
the boat, my
three-week-old
baby became
very sick.
In
fear
that
our
baby
would die
if we
continued for
much
longer
on
the
ocean,
my
husband
and
I
decided to
return
co
Vietnam by
climbing aboard
a fishing
boat rhat we mer
on
the
way which was going back
co
Vietnam. Lacer,
J
learned
that
just three
hours
after
we
left
my family's
boat,
it was
picked
up
by the
avy's
Seventh
Fleer.
Bur
we
were
ro
remain in Vietnam
for
the next
four years.
Back in
Saigon,
my
husband
was
soon
imprisoned in
a
Com-
munist re-education
camp be-
cause
he had been the newsroom
chief
of
the Vietnamese Army's
radio station.
Two
years later,
in
1977, I
helped
co plot
his
escape.
One day,
posing as a
peasant
woman,
I
concealed a
riny nore inside
a cigarette
celling
my
husband
ro
be
pre-
pared
co
escape, that
I
would
pick
him up
on
his
way
ro
his
daily
rourine
of
hard labor
in
the
jungle,
and
that
I
had
false
ID's
for
him
and a
place co hide
until
we
could board a boat to
leave Vietnam. But by
acci-
dent, a guard found
the note
and arrested
borh of us. My
husband was
tortured and
locked
in a six-foot by four-foot
cage,
bur he managed
ro
escape
10
days
lacer.
I was in jail
for
two months and then
released
as bait co
capture
my husband.
Bur,
with
help
from a group
of
close
friends,
we managed
to
avoid being caught
by living in
hiding for the next two years.
Twenty times we
cried
co
escape
by boat,
and
20
rimes
we
failed.
Most of
those rimes,
we never
even got
·co
a
boat.
There were people who
knew
our
need
co
flee Vietnam
ac any
price, and they cook advantage
of our
situation.
I
remember
one
time when my husband
and
I had to walk
for
miles on rocky
roads, ch
rough
rice
fields
in the
delta and
along
the
coast
of
South Vietnam
ro get
ro rhe
promised
boat. We nearly
drowned while half-walking,
half-swimming through
a
river
C
OMME
CEME
T 1
9
8
8
The
Rev.
Terence Attridge
(
left).
founder and
director
of
the 11bsta11ce
Abme Ministry
of
the
ew
York
Archdiocese. and Floyd
Patterson.
former
Heavyweight
Champio11
of
the World. 110w
a
prominent
yo11th
worker.
Both
are recipients
of
Doctor
of
H1111iane
Letten degrees.
wirh
water up
co
our chins and
our
three-year-old on our shoul-
ders-bur
the
expected boar
was not
at the
waiting place,
and we
had r
go all
the way
back. Just walking,
exhausted,
with wet
clothes
and
bare
feet
would have been
enough
proof
for the
police
co
arrest
us
for
attempting
co flee the
country.
By
sheer
luck,
we
were never
caught.
But there were
also
times
when
after a failed at-
tempt, robbers would wait
for
us
on our way
back,
putting
knives at our
necks co rake
away
all of our possessions,
knowing
rhac
we were fugitives
and
chat
we would never
dare
co
report
the incident
ro
anyone.
Once, when I
was six
month
pregnant, we
got as far as
the
open
sea,
but
the moror died
after two
days, and we
drifted
for
13
more days, urviving
only
by boiling sea water
and
drinking
the condensed steam.
In this way,
each of
us
on the
boat
was rationed to no more
rhan half
a cup of
water
a
day.
During this rime, many
com-
mercial
ships passed
by us, but
none stopped
ro
rescue us. One
man in
our
boar died
of
thirst,
and
we had
ro push
his body
overboard.
At that
point, we
Jost
all
hope
and simply waited
to
die. On the 15th day,
fate-
fully,
we discovered that
we
had drifted back to Vietnam,
where we
were
again arrested,
and
from
where
we again
es-
caped.
In
1979,
ju tafrerrhe birth
of our second daughter,
we
fled
Vietnam in
a
small fishing boar
packed with
81
boar people.
Once
again our
motor died,
and
chi time we drifted
at ea
for
10
days, bur
with
the
cur-
rents taking us
away from
Viet-
nam. And
again
we were
ig-
nored by
commerical ships
char
would
not
stop
ro rescue us.
We
can
never
forget those
desperate moments
at sea,
beg-
ging for
help
and
being denied.
On the
10th day
we were
attacked
by Thai
pirate .
The
pirates cowed
our
boat
ro
Ko
Kra,
a deserted
i land in
the
Gulf
of
Thailand,
where for
three weeks
of
hell mo t
of
the
men were rorcured
and most of
the
women
were
gang-raped.
In
fear for
my
life
I had
ro
abandon my four-year-old child
and
my
four-month-old
baby
to
their
father while
I
hid
in
the brush with
rats and scor-
pions.
When
the pi rare er fire
co
the brush
co
smoke che
women
out,
I
and
two
others
went deeper
into the
jungle,
climbing the
steep mountain
that
overlooked
the
ocean---a
spot so
dangerous that it
gave
us the
option of
jumping to
our
"N
o matter
how hard
the struggle
one can
persevere
and overcome."
deaths if
we
were
ever
found by
the pirates.
Jr
was
o cold
from
the
wind and the storms, and
we lived with
constant fear and
carvarion.
I
sometimes
wished
for
death
ro come and put
an
end to that desperate fear.
On the
2
Lsr day
in Ko Kra,
an
oil company helicopter flew
over
rhe
island and the pilot
saw us.
He reported
what
he
saw
ro the
United
Nations
High
ommissioner for
Ref-
ugees,
and
the
.
represen-
tative
in Thailand
came
out the
next day
ro
re
cue
us. When I
got
co
the refugee
camp in
Songkhla, I weighed
only
70
pounds.
I
wond r
till how
I
survived. But I did make
a vow
co myself on that island that,
if
I
urvived, J would
do any-
thing
ro make
my
experiences
helpful to
others.
As
soon as we arrived in the
refugee
camp in
Thailand, my
husband
and
I helped
co break
the
story of
the
boat people by
writing
an open
letter
which
the United
Nations released
co
the international press-a
Statement
that
for
the
first
time, and from the victims·
point of
view, described in
derail
the
tragedies of
the
boat
people. Inspired
by chat open
letter, a
group
of
Vietnamese
refugees
founded the
Boat
People
.0. .
ommitree in
San Diego
in
1980.
We
later
co-authored a
little
book about
our experiences entitled
Pirates
i11
the
G
111[
of
iam,
and
helped
ro
start a
human rights
cam-
paign against the still-
continuing piracy.
We
still
work with the Boar
P
ople
.O.S.
Committee
in assisting
refugee
nationally and interna-
cionally.
In
19 0
we
arrived
in the
United
States
from
the refugee
camps.
While
nothing can
change the
Jove we
feel for our
homeland
or
heal
the
hurt
of
our
loss, we
also cherish
the
fact
that we
have
been accepted as
citizens of our adoptive
home-
land.
an
Diego
is
now
our
home,
and
America is now the
birthplace of our two youngest
daughters, who restore
anew
our sense of beauty, joy and
truth.
We
started
from
scratch in
America, but in this land
of
beginnings
that respects in-
cericy
and
hard
work, ic
hasn't
MARI T MAGAZJ
E

FALL 19
8
























been
easy
for us, this long and
difficult struggle. For example,
it has been very hard especially
to
learn the language, which is
I
ike learning co express oneself
al 1 over again. In face, surpris-
ing as it may seem, che daily
struggle of making
a
living in
America is more difficult
to
cope with than all of the events
we went through in prison and
at sea. The rea on is that there
is nothing
"heroic"
about sur-
viving the never-ending prob-
lems
of daily
I
ife. There are few
rewards and even less recogni-
tion for cooking, cleaning,
raising a family, finding a job,
going co work every day or
struggling with a completely
different language. There
are
no
"enemies"
co fight against;
there are no clear-cut choices.
Still, no matter how hard the
struggle, one
can
persevere and
overcome, and in chat process
we learn some important les-
sons. We learn,
in adapting to
a new environment, the
impor-
tance of being flexible and
open. We learn that it is crucial
ro have faith and
love
as means
of survival, and to never give
up hope. And we learn just how
important is the support of
ochers, especially of family and
friends, if one is ro succeed in
anything in life.
In addition, struggle itself
can also make you stronger.
Noc
least,
it has helped me ro
appreciate and nor ro cake for
granted the things chat are
truly important in life-in-
cluding the simplest aces of
kindness. And because I have
survived all of the things chat
have happened co me,
1
feel a
mysterious debr--even
a
duty-co
work to help ocher
boat people, and ro use my
experience in the hope that it
will inspire others never to give
up struggling ro overcome the
obstacles chat f, ce rhem.
Although many people in
this country do not realize ir,
to this very day the flow of boat
people risking their lives on the
high seas continues. Every
month, about
2,000
Viet-
namese are still fleeing their
homeland on fragile, rickety
boats. And co dare, according
co the United
acions, more
than
250,000
boat eople may
have died trying co escape. Our
third daughter, Binh-Minh, is
MARI T MAGAZI
E

FALL 1988
C
OMME
CEME
T 1
9
8 8
named after my clo est friend
from Vietnam, who risked her
life for us during our years of
hiding; she died at sea with her
entire family.
Since 1985, the Boar People
S.0.S. Committee has co-spon-
sored a mercy ship operating in
the ouch China Sea co rescue
the boat people. During the
lase three years, we have rescued
more than
2,000
people; most
of them have been reseeded in
other Western countries, since
the United States has not issued
visas
co
the
refugees
rescued by
the mercy
ship.
Last month,
f
had che oppor-
tunity co return co the South
China Sea
to
participate in one
such rescue mission. During
the short period
I
was there, we
picked up a small boat crowded
wich
40
Vietname e refugees,
among them 17 children. They
were
in
a desperate condition
after drifting for 10 days in the
ocean. Their rank of drinking
water had been broken on the
second day, and they had co
survive by drinking ocean
water-some
children even had
to drink their own urine. They
coo had been ignored by many
international ships char passed
chem by. On the eighth day
they had landed on a beach in
Indonesia, but were pu hed
back co the high seas by Indone-
sian authorities. On the ninth
day, they again reached shore,
but once
again
their boat was
cowed back ro rhe ocean. By
then, they were expecting to
die. When chey saw us, they
were so desperate char even
when we approached them and
were about co pick chem up,
ome people kept repeating, in
a state of shock and disbelief:
"Please
save us, please don't
abandon us, we are dying!"
And o, chat is my scory. 1
came here to share it with you
at your commencement.
But
1
also came
to
say co you: Con-
gratulations! Today, we come
together to celebrate your story.
You coo are survivors. You roo
srruggled ro gee here. Your
achievement today is a mile-
scone.
Ir is an achievement chat
no one can ever cake away from
you.
Ir
is a vindication of honest
effort. Bur ic is also only a
beginning, a commencement.
Ahead lie many challenges,
many obstacles, many oppor-
tunities. And because you have
survived, much will be ex-
peered of you.
I wish you every success,
knowing that whac matters
mosc abouc success is how a
person achieves i r.
1
wish you
the
gift of cour-
age, whenever you are faced
with the crises that surely lie
ahead.
J wish you the gift of com pa -
sion whenever you find others
less
privileged than yourselves,
because we are all pare of che
same human family.
And I wish you che gift of
wisdom.
It will be your best
guide
and companion along the
journey thac commences for
you today.
All of these ideals are
at
the
heart of Marist College, and
1
am
sure that they are also in
your hearts.
I have learned from my ex-
perience char
in
this world
there is much fear, cruelty and
ignorance. Bur
1
am also sure
that from your courage, your
compassion, and your wisdom,
each
of you
can
help ro make
our world a better one----a world
more beautiful, more peaceful,
and more truthful than any we
have ever known.
Thank you all very
much.

Marist College President Dennis
J.
Murray
(left),
gathers with
dignitarieJ (from left to right). Vu Thanh
Thuy,
1988
commencement
speaker; the Rev. Terence
Attridge, recipient
of a Doctor
of
H11111ane
Letters degree;
Floyd Pa/tenon, recipient
of a
Doctor
of
Humane Letters degree; Donald Love, Marist College Board
of
Tmstees chaim1a11;
and Brother Paid AmbrOJe
Fontaine,
founder of
Marist College, who made a brief return
visit
from Liberia where he is the
administrator of
the Diome
of
Cape Pa/mas.
37




































38
ALUM
I FOCUS
Marist graduate
commands ship and crew to safety
IN TH
PA
T
YEAR
che life of
Commander Paul X. Rinn,
a
graduace of
the Marist
class of
1968, has been
an odys ey
which has taken him
from a
near
violent
death in rhe Persian
Gulf
and brought
him home
co
South Carolina where President
Ronald Reagan telephoned to
in vice him
co
the White House.
On Apri
I
14,
the
avy de-
stroyer
SS
Samttel
B. Roberts,
of
which Rinn was
comman-
der, struck
one of
many sub-
merged mines that had been
placed indiscriminately
by
Iranians in
the
busy shipping
lanes
of
the Per ian Gulf. After
monrhs of routine
operations
in
the Gulf, the
incidenr came as
a
shock.
The
explosion tore a 22-foor
hole in rhe ship's side, injuring
10
of the
22
crew members
and causing a chain
reacrion
of
evenrs
on
board char, if
in
the
hands
of
lesser
men, according
co
naval
officials,
might have
sunk the ship.
"My
firsr feeling
was chat
there was
a
real
good chance
we
were
all going
co die,"
said
Rinn in
a
recent telephone
inrerview from his home base
in Charlesron,
.
.
"The
sound
was chat
of an
incredibly
large
explosion,
then there were
flames
shoori
ng
up
100 feet
above deck. I don't know how
to
escribe
what che roar
of
such
a fire was like. The
explo-
sion
pretty much
broke
the
ship
in two."
Whar rook
place after
the
explosion
was a swift
yet
delib-
erate
series
of
measure
char
kept che
3,
740-con,445-foor-
long
ship afloat:
The
crew
closed
the warenighr doors;
Rinn
ordered
the two
auxiliary
engines
rurned
on;
mechanics
repaired the
ship's only
helicop-
ter, which had been damaged
in the
explosion;
others put
our
fires and removed
ammunition
from
areas
where
fires
were
encroaching. Theshipdererio-
raced
so badly chat,
in
what
seemed
to
be the final hour, it
was held together with
only
steel
cables and girders.
The
situation in
the Persian
Gulf is
a
dangerous
one
that is
perhaps coo lircle
understood
here in
the
niced races, aid
Rinn, a
20-year
naval
officer.
"You go
inco
a
hostile situation
in which we
are
not
ar
war
and
you
have co keep neutral but
you
also
have
to
defend
your
ship," he said.
There is
also
the
weather co
contend
with: Crews there
battle temperatures
of
up co
110
degrees
and occasional
sandstorms
thar
blow from the
deserts our
inco
the
open
wacer.
In
addition,
the Gulf being
8,000 miles from the
United
cares
can cause
difficulties in
communications
between che
various
capacities
in several
troubled
area throughout the
world, including
three
previous
missions in the Middle Easr,
and
a
mission in Southeast
Asia, where he was the
lasr
U.
.
1
avy
officer
co
leave
Phnom Penh, rhe
capital of
ambodia,
before the
city fell
to the Khmer Rouge.
On his most recent mission,
Rinn had been
in the
Persian
Gulf roughly three monchs-
the ship had left the U.S. ona
six-month deployment
to
the
Middle Ease
on
Jan. 11-before
the explosion. He
and
his
crew
had several casks, including
avy Com111a11der
Pa11/
X. Rinn,
'68
and
the
U
Roberrs
at
the
pier in
eu,porl.
R. l.
last
ovember.
/w(I
months he/rwe
the Roberts
deployed
fa,·
dNI)'
i11
the Persian G11lf
two place
.
The
combination of
factors, said Rinn, makes the
Persian Gulf
a
"very
difficult"
location
in
which to operare.
In 1985 Rinn, who
graduated
from Marisr with a
Bachelor
of
Arrs
degree
in
political science, became the
youngest commanding officer
of
the
am/fel
B. Roberts.
The
de croyer is named in the mem-
ory of one of the most honored
naval officers, Coxswain Samuel
B.
Roberts, who died during
che battle
of
Guadalcanal dur-
ing
World War II. The
Roberli
is one of
the
avy·s most mod-
ern
frigates. The
ship
has
che
most up-to-date rechnology
and
defense systems.
Its
gas-
turbine
engines
have che power
equivalent
to
thar
of
a Boeing
707
jet, Rinn said.
Rinn's
appointment as com-
mander was the
culmination of
a career
in which he'd served in
keeping open the shipping
lanes in the Gulf, escorting
cargo
ships
and oil
tankers
through the Gulf
and
prevent-
ing an arrack
against any
U.
flag-carrying ship.
Rinn said che
avy·s
m1 s10n
in rhe Gulf i in che interest
of
the
world
economy:
Without
proper measures, the
econ-
omy-which
depends
so
much on shipping through the
Per ian Gulf-could
very
well
collapse.
He
recalled
che
oil
crises of the 1970'
,
and said
char
it
was
abouc
co
happen
again
when the lranians began
etting
mines in rhe Gulf.
One
oil tanker, he said,
carries enough
oil
co fuel a
medium- ized city uch
as
Poughkeepsie-including
all
the cars-for
an entire year.
Rinn said he
and
his crew es-
corted 80 of these oil tankers
through the Persian Gulf,
in
addition to several other ships
that
carried
a coral of roughly
100 million tons of
cargo.
After the
RobertJ was dam-
aged,
it was
cowed
through
heavy
seas
ro
Dubai, United
Arab Emirates, and was pur in
dry
dock for damage
inspection
and
preparation for
the trip
back
co
the
nited rates.
Shortly
after
Rinn
returned
co
the United States
and
re-
joined
his wife, Pamela,
and
their rhree reen-age
children
August
I,
President Reagan
called
him
co congratulate
him
for saving the
lives of
his crew
and che ship,
and
co invite him
to visit him
at
the White
Hou
e.
Rinn has
already
been
awarded the Legion of Merit
..,
with
ombac
V
(Valor),
che
" fourth highest military award
and one of several
ocher military
awards he has received during
his naval
career.
High naval
officials
say they
are
planning to use Rinn's
experience
in
the
Gulf in
the
curriculum
in damage
control
at
the
U.S.
1
a
val Academy
at
Annapolis.
"Left
ro
her
own
devices,"
said one
naval
officer,
the ship
''surely
would have
sunk."
Rinn was relieved as
com-
manding
officer of
the
Sa11111el
B.
Roberts
on
June
20
aboard
the hipwhileitwasinDubai.
The
Roberts is
currently
in
ew-
porr, R. I., and soon will travel
co
Bach Iron Works in Maine
for a
new keel,
a
rebuilt
engine
room
and other
repair which
will
cost about
100 million,
Rinn said. To replace
the entire
ship
and
its
computerized
technology would
cost
up co
700
million, he said.
Would he
go
ro
rhe Persian
Gulf
again?
"Going
to
the Gulf
doe
n'r bother me,"
said
Rinn,
who is
ar
present the
chief
scaff
officer-
econd in command-
of
Destroyer Squadron Six,
a
group of l ships.
"If
I were
called
co
go
there tomorrow,
I'd
go, ..
he aid.
"I
have
erved
my
country
to
rhe
best of my ability," Rinn
said,
"to
bring peace
ro
che
world
in
the true sense of the
word."

MARIST MAGAZI
E

FALL
1988






















MARI
T PEOPLE
Five appointed
to board of trustees
on
the Board f Directors
of
Dutchess Bank.
he is
a
member
of
the Marist
ollege
Adult
,ducation
Community
Advisory Board,
and a
board
member
of the
Millbrook
Library
and
Upstate Films
in
Rhinebeck, N.Y.
DOUGLAS
EDWAR
,
BRENDA
T.
BURKE,
ELLEN
M. HA
COCK,
HELE M.
ME
ERVE and ELIZABETH
M.
WOLF
are
the newest mem-
bers
ro be
appointed to
the
Marist
ollege
Board
ofTrus-
tees.
ach
has been
appointed
for a
three-year term.
D011glas
EdU'ards
Edwards,
a veteran jour-
nalist
and
B
corr spondent,
anchored
CBS'
first week-
night
news
broadca t
from
1948
until
1962.
He then
moved
to
the CBS News
weekday
afternoon broad-
casts, an assignment
he held
with
eu•sbrec,k,
the CBS
ews
headline
service,
until
his retirement
on
April
l,
1988,
after
56
years in
the
business.
In
1986, Marisr
presented
its annual
Lowell Thomas
Award
to
Douglas
Edwards in
recognition of
his
outstanding
career. Edwards and
his
wife,
ac,
reside
in
Sarasota,
Fla.
Burke,
a 1968 graduate of
Marisr
ollege, is director of
personnel,
Broadcast
Facilitie
,East
oastfor
ap-
ital Cities/ ABC, Inc. He is
responsible
for personnel ad-
ministration
and employee
MAR/ST MAGAZINE•
FALL 1988
Bre11da11
T.
811rke
relations services
for opera-
tions
in
New York,
Washington,
D.
. and
Chicago.
Burke ha
been a very active
Marist
alumnus,
serving
as
president
of
the Alumni As-
sociation
from
1982
to
1987.
He has been
a
member
of the
Alumni
Executive
Board
and
the ommunicarion
Art Ad-
visory
ouncil.
Burke
and
his
wife,
Betsy,
have four chil-
dren
and live in
Bayport,
.Y.
Ellen M.
Hancock
Hancock"s
career wich
IBM
spans 22 years.
In January
of
this year,
she was
named IBM
vice
president and general
manager
for
Communication
ysrems.
As
general
manager
for Communication
Systems,
he
is
responsible
for
both
the
Communication
Produces
y
rems Division
and
the
ROLM
yscems
Division.
he
was previously pre
idem
of
Telecommunications
ystems
for
the
ommunicarion
Prod-
ucts Division.
Hancock
holds a
Bachelor
of
Arcs
degree
in
mathematics
from the
ollege of
ew
Rochelle
and a
Master
of
Arcs
degree in mathematics from
Fordham
niversity. he and
her
husband, Jason, live in
Ridgefield,
Conn.
Meserve
received a
Bachelor
of
Arts degree in Far
Ea
rem
history from Scan
ford
U niver-
sity
in
1961.
he
and
her
husband
and
three
children
live in
Amenia,
.
Y.
Elizabeth
M. Wolf
~
;;j
Wolf is
a
prominent
civic
Helen M.
Meserve
Meserve,
with
her hu
band
Hamilron Me
erve, owns
Taconic
ewspapers,
which
publi
hes
eight
weekly news-
papers in
Durche
s
County,
as well as
D111cheSJ
Magazine.
Orange
Magazine
and the
H
11d-
so11
Valley
G11ide.
he
was
the
chairperson of
the Dutchess Arrs
Fund in
1987, and erved on the
Dutchess
County
Arcs
oun-
cil
Board
of
Direcrors from
1980
ro
1986.
She was
a
tru
tee of
the Dutchess Day
chool
in Millbrook
from
19
3
to
1985.
Meserve
currently erves
leader
in
Dutchess County.
he
is
president
of
the Dutch-
ess
County Bar A
sociarion
z
Auxiliary
and
vice president
~
of
the Sr. Francis Hospital
~
Auxiliary in Poughkeepsie.
-:
She is a member
of
the Board
of
Director
of
the Cardinal
Hayes Home
for
Children in
Millbrook,
and a
member
of
the Alumnae Council
of
the
College
of
ew
Rochelle,
where she received
a
Bachelor
of
Arcs
degree
in 1956.
\'v'olf is
also an active
church leader,
serving
a
chairpcr on of
the Dutchess
Vicariare Council
and as a
delegate
co
rhe
18th ynod
of
the
ew
York Archdiocese.
he
is a euchariscic
minister
and confirmation
cla reacher
at t. ranislaus Church
in
Pleasant Valley.
he
and
her
hu band,John,
and
rheircwo
children
live in Pleasant Val-
ley, N.Y.
39
























40
Donald
Love
Donald Love
appointed
board
chairman
Do
ALO
LOVE,
a
nine-year
member
of the
Mari
st College
Board
of
Trustees, wa
ap-
pointed
chairman of
the board
in
December. He
is serving a
two-year
term.
"Don
Love
brings a
distin-
guished
record
of community
service
to
thi position, and
follows
ina long line
of chair-
men
who have made tremen-
dous
contributions to the
development of
Marisr Col-
lege,"
said Marist President
Dennis J. Murray upon the
announcement of
the
appoint-
ment.
Love,
an
independent
fi-
nancial
consultant and former
president
and owner of the
Love Oil
Corporation,
was
MARIST
first
appointed to
the Marist
board
in 1979.
Prior
to be-
coming
chairman, he was the
board's vice
chairman for two
years.
He
is
a
lifelong
Poughkeep-
sie
resident whose philan-
thropic
activities
include
er-
vice
on
the boards
of
Vassar
Ho
pita!,
the Poughkeep ie
Rotary, the Dutchess County
Boy
cours,
the Poughkeepsie
Area Chamber of Commerce,
the
United
Way
and several
others.
He is
a graduate
of
Poughkeepsie High School,
and attended
Pace University
and
La alle Extension
niver-
sity.
Jack
ewman,
board
member since
1985,
is the
board's vice
chairman.
New-
man, a
Poughkeepsie resident
since 1948,
is president
of
Drive and Park, Inc. Prior to
his appointment
as
vice
chair-
man,
Newman served as
board
secretary.
James Cannavino was
ap-
pointed
the board'
ecretary.
He has been
a
board member
since 1986. He is
an
IBM
vice
president
and
president of
IBM's Dara
y rems
Division.
Cannavino joined IBM in
Chicago in 1963,
and
has had
several
assignments
in
Poughkeepsie
since
L97
l.
Jonah
Sherman is the
board's
treasurer.
herman,
a
board member
since
1983, is
president
of
herman Furni-
ture Corporation in
Poughkeepsie.
In
197L,
he
was
presented a
Marist
ol-
lege President's Award.
In
addition, hewaschairmanof
a successful 1985 Marist Fund
campaign.
PEOPLE
Playing politics with
"Hail to the Chief"
Jim
Corbell, a 197
3
Marist
grad11ate,
exp/aim
the m/e;
of
his
ga111e,
··
Hail
to the Chief.•· during a recent
promotional
visit
al
\'(I
ald.enkids
in the
Poughkeepsie
Gafferia Mall.
ITS
AN
OLD
AW
rhar anyone
can become
President
of
the
niced
cares. In a new board
game
invented
by
Jim Cor-
bett, a
1973Maristgraduate,
whether one
reaches
the
Pres-
idency is, well, in the cards.
In his
game,
"Hail
to the
hief," players vie for
the
Presidency
by correctly
answering questions on his-
tory, the
Presidency,
geog-
raphy
and the U.S. Const i ru-
rion.
(Who usually gives
the
oath of office to rhe
President?
What
state
has
the fewest
people? Who was the first
President
co
publish
memoirs'
Who was his liter-
ary agent')
The
game's first
priming of L0,000 has sold
out since
ic
went on sale
a
year
ago, and the producer
has just
made 5,000 more. The
mirhsonian
Jnstirnrion
and
the
arional
Archives
are so
impres ed with the game that
they are selling ir in their gift
shops. The game is also
the
1987
Parents'
Choice
Magazine Silver
Award win-
ner. Corbett,
3
7, is currently
a
resident
of Seattle. The
answers to
the
above questions
are, in order: chief justice of
the
U.S.
Supreme
Court;
Wyoming;
Ulysses
.
Grant;
Mark Twain.
Mari
st honors
10
employees for 20 years of service
LAST
FALL IO Marisr College
employees
were recognized
for
their
20
year
of
service
to
the school.
Marisr
President
Dennis J.
Murray presented each hon-
oree
with a commemorative
plaque
at
the eighth annual
Founders Day
Luncheon.
Addressing
more than 100
members of rhe Marist
com-
munity, Murray spoke of
coming together to
"celebrate
Marist
College and, more
important, rhe
people that
bring Marist
College
to
life."
The honoree were:
Iralo
Benin,
asso iate profes-
sor of philosophy, Staarsburg,
N.Y.; igrid
Brandis,
adjunct
professor of
German, Wap-
pingers Falls,
.
Y.;
Gerard
Cox,
vice
president
of student
affairs and assistant professor
ofcommunications,
Wappin-
gers Falls,
.
Y.;
Vincent
Kotschar,
ass is rant professor
of anthropology,
Poughkeep-
ie,
.
Y.; Joy
Kudlo, secre-
tary for che division of arcs
and
letters, Hyde
Park,
.
Y.;
Lawrence Menapace,
associate
profes or of chem is
cry,
Poughkeepsie,
.Y.;
Peter
O'Keefe,
associate professor
of
history, Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.; Lucy
Pettway,
food
services worker,
Poughkeep-
sie,
N.Y.;LaurenceSullivan,
assistant profes or of
religious
tudies, Hyde Park,
.
Y.;
Edward
Waters,
vice presi-
dent for administration,
Millbrook, N.Y
MARIST
MAGAZJ
E

FALL 1988







































MARI
T PEOPLE
New executive
vice president
at Marist
ullivan,
a
former
resident
of
West
Hartford, Conn.,
previously served
as
vice pres-
ident for
administrative af-
fairs at ouchern
Connecticut
Mark S11Lliva11
MARK
LLIV AN
became
Marist's
executive
vice presi-
dent
earlier
this
year.
Sullivan
succeeded
John
Lahey, who
last
year
became
president of
Quinnipiac
College in
Ham-
den,
Conn.
"Mark
ullivan has been
one of
the
leading
educators
in
Connecticut and we
are
delighted
that
he joined
the
Marist
community,"
said
..,
Marisc
President Dennis
J.
~
Murray.
"Because
of his
:
unique
com
bi nation
of experi-
~
ences in
higher
education,
he
z
is
ideally suited
for
chis
posi-
tion.
race
University
in
New
Haven.
Before his
service
there, Sullivan was Connec-
ticut's
assistant commissioner
of
higher
education.
He
briefly
served as
the state's
acting
commissioner of
higher
education
in
I
981
and, from
1978
to
198
L,
was
the
director of
the Connec-
ticut
Board of Higher Educa-
tion's Office of Budget
and
Fiscal Analysis.
Prior
to
his
career in educa-
tion, Sullivan was
executive
budget officer
in
the
Gover-
nor's
office
in
Wisconsin.
He
also
held
the position
of
pro-
gram analyst
in
the
assistant
Paul
J.
Browne, '71, is new
vice president
for college advancement
PAUL
J.
BROW1 E,
a
1971
Marisc
graduate,
has been
appointed Marist vice presi-
dent for
college advancement.
Browne,
39, come co
che
position as
former
Albany
bureau
chiefofThe
eU'
York
Lawjoumal,
the nation's
oldest
daily publication spe-
cializing
in the law. Prior
to
that, he was Albany bureau
chief for
The
etl'
York Daily
ews.
During his tenure
there,
he
traveled
with Mario
Cuomo during the Governor'
trip
to
rhe
oviec
Union.
Before joining
The
Daily
News, he wa
chief
of
staff and
press secretary for
U. . ena-
tor Daniel P. Moynihan
of
ew
York.
"Paul
was the unanimous
choice
of
the collegewide
selection
committee,·· said
Marisr President Dennis
J.
Murray.
"He
is familiarwirh
che inner workings
of
both
Albany
and
Washingcon
and
will be invaluable co us as we
seek
state
and
federal funding
opportunities.
While
a
student
at
Marist,
Browne spent his junior
year
MARIST MAGAZI
E

FALL
1988
P
au/
J.
Browne
in Bogota, Colombia, study-
ing Larin American politics
and panish. After
graduating
from Marist with a Bachelor
of
Arts degree in American
studies, he became a volunteer
teacher
at
Marist Brothers
High School in American
amoa.
After his return co
the
United States in
1972,
he
went co work
as a
political
writer
for
The
\'(I
aterlown
Daily
Times
in Watertown,
.Y.
During this time, he was
granted a
leave
to attend the
Columbia University School
of
Journalism.
After
obtain-
ing his master's degree in
journalism, he returned
co
the paper
ro
work as its Al-
bany correspondent. In
1984,
he joined Moynihan·s staff
as
executive
assistant.
Browne also has been in-
:i:
volved with Marist alumni
~
fund raising
activities,
having
;:; volunteered
in
annual cele-
o
~
phone solicitation drives
and
>
having served as president
of
Q
the Albany Chapter
of
the
Marist College Alumni A
-
sociarion. He was the re-
cipient
of the
first
Alumni
Award upon his graduation in
1971
"It
is particularly
gratify-
ing to return
to
a
Marisr char
has
grown
not
only
in size but
prestige," Browne
said.
"As
an alumnus,
my
work here is
a
labor
of
love."
secretary's office
in
the
U.S.
Department
of Housing and
Urban
Development.
Ar
Southern Connecticut,
ullivan was the university's
chief administrative officer
with broad
responsibilities
in
the areas
of
planning,
finan-
cial
management,
university
operations, fund
raising
and
external and government
rela-
tions.
Southern
Connecticut
care is
the
third largest
pub-
lic
university
in
Connecticut,
with
an enrollment of
more
than
12,000
students.
Sullivan holds
a
Ph.D.
degree
in
education
from
Harvard University,
an
M.A
.
degree
in
public adminisrra-
rion from
the
Maxwell
Graduate School
of
Public
Affair
at yracuse Universiry,
and an
undergraduate degree
in political
cience
from
the
University
of
Rhode
Island.
He has
lectured and
caught
courses
at
the
graduate
level
in
education
policy, public
finance
and
federal/scare rela-
tions in higher
education.
While
in
Connecticut,
ullivan
scarfed or served on
a
variety
of special commis-
sions and
cask
forces
dealing
with
higher
education
issues,
including
the Governor's
Commission on Higher Edu-
cation and
the
Economy
and
the
General
Assembly's
Spe-
cial
Commission
on
the Fu-
ture
of
Independent Colleges
and
niversicies
in
Connec-
ticut.
Commenting
on
his Marisr
College
appointment,
Sulli-
van
said, "I
feel very
fortunate
to
have
been
chosen for
such
an important
position
at
such
a
dynamic
college.
The Marist
reputation
as a
fine
liberal
arcs
college
wich
a commitment
to excellence in a
number
of
exciting
program areas
grows
stronger every year.
!cs
faculty
is
strong,
its
administration
is
creative and
very profes-
sional,
and
ics board
is
dedi-
cated
co building an institu-
tion of
national Stature. Add
co
char
a
scrong
and active
relationship with the
commu-
nity
and
you have
an atmos-
phere which
is the ideal for
colleges and
universities
across
rhe
country."
4 l



















42
MARJ
T p
OPLE
Only the best: two from Marist faculty
help judge TV Emmy Awards
tragedy
and pain,
Cole
said
the
overall effect on
him was
somewhat
discurbing.
"I
wound up wirh nightmares,"
he
said. "I saw a
lor
of
people
dying."
"IT
WA
LIKE DRIVI
G
to
Florida nonstop."
That was how Robert
or-
man,
associate professor of
communications,
described
a
two-day
Judging session of
nominations
for
this
year's
Emmy Awards.
or man
and
Douglas Cole,
a
visiting instructor
of com-
munications, were two
of
six
judges
chosen by
the
ational
Academy
of
Televisi n Arts
and
Sciences ro select winners
for the National
ews and
Documentary
category for
this
year's Emmy Awards.
orman, Cole and
the
other
four
judges watched
a
combined
total
of
50
entries
produced
and
shown by the
nation's
commercial and cable
television networks in
1987.
The
cask
cook cw full days,
from 8
a.
m. to 6
p.m.,
Nor-
man said.
"It
was just incredible
co
sit there for cwo
days and
watch some
of
che best televi-
sion produced during the
year," said Cole.
"You're
watching what the best people
in the
country ;ire
doing,
and
watching what they
consider
co
be their best work."
During
the judging period
at the
Roosevelt Hotel in
Manhattan,
none of the
judges was
permitted
co
dis-
cuss
or
comment
on
the
pro-
grams,
Orman said.
The
judges were
seated
in
a room
together to
watch
the entries.
The programs, many of which
were hour-long documentaries,
were shown as
long
as
any of
che judges wanted to see
chem. Usually, Norman said,
an
hour program was watched
for about a
half-hour.
"When everyone
wanted
to
see more
of a certain
program,
you
knew it was
good,"
said
Norman.
Norman has
been
involved
with broadcasting for more
than
30
years,
and
has worked
for NBC, ABC
and
WCBS
Radio, in addition
to
The
experience,
orman
said, was unique
and
reward-
ing; unique in chat
one
watched so much
good
televi-
sion
in
one sitting, and
re-
warding in char he
and
Cole
have had the
opportunity to
be a part
of
a nationwide
and
important
television competi-
tion. Marisc
interns ac the
Academy,
arrie
Boyle
and
Ed Eberling, help
d organize
and
run the
event.
Norman
and
Cole have
already been asked to parrici-
"
pate in next
year's
judging
of
t
the Emmy Awards,
and
they
i
said
they
have tentatively
~
accepted.
The drive
co
,,
Florida, in
ocher
words, is a
orman (right), anociate
projeSJor
of comm11nicatious,
and
DoNglas
long
one, bur
it's
worth the
Cole, imtmctor of comimmicatiom,
at work
in /\forist's
television
prod11ctio11
trip.
studio.
Poughkeepsie's WEOK
and
Kingston's WK
Y. In addi-
tion
co
his reaching
at
Marisr,
he is
also
the director of
Marisc's
communications
in-
ternship program.
The
programs and
news
segments in
the Emmy com-
pecicion covered
the spectrum
of
human
events
in 1987,
including AJD
,
rhe home-
less, Oliver
orrh, Cher-
nobyl, Afghanistan,
ouch
Korea,
Israel,
the stock mar-
ker
crash,
the Iran-Contra
hearings, South Africa,
drugs,
and the
California
redwoods.
"There
was nothing
char
was nor
good,"
aid
Cole.
Cole joined Matise in
1986
and
has had
extensive
profes-
sional
experience in
commer-
cial
television
and
radio, as
well
as in advertising agencies
as a producer,
writer and
announcer.
Programs were judged on
rhe quality
of
the film,
or-
gan
izarion of the story's
con-
cept and execution of
rhe
project-a
fairly
objective
approach.
Yer, be auseofche
nature of the programs, which
focused
on continuing
news
issues, many involving
Marist names assistant vp
for academic affairs
Linda Cool
MARI
T HA
APPOI TED
Linda Cool as assistant vice
president for academic affairs
and dean of academic pro-
grams and services.
Cool oversees
rhe
areas of
academic advising, faculty
development, student and
program assessment, career
development and field experi-
ence,
the
Higher Educational
Opportunity
Program,
the
Special Academic
Programs
and
the
Learning
Center.
Cool received her B.A.
degree in anthropology
from
Bryn Mawr
College, graduat-
ing magna cum laude. She
holds
a
Ph.D.
degree in an-
thropology from Duke
Uni-
versity. She served as the
chairperson of
rhe
departmen c
of anchropology/sociology
at
anca Clara University, where
she had worked for the past
11 years.
Citing
Marisr's
efforts
to
provide educational oppor-
tunities
co minorities and co
disabled persons, Cool said,
"I am impressed with
Marist's
interest in reaching our co
the
whole population, not just
the ones that are traditionally
represented, but the ones
which are underrepresented,
as well."
ARJST MA AZI
E

FALL
1988



















MARI
Eleanor Charwat becomes
new executive director
of adult education
Eleanor Chan/!at
ELEANOR CHAR
WAT
was
recently appointed
executive
directOr
of
adult
education.
Charwat began her
career at
Marist
in
1984
as coordinator
of the Fishkill Extension
Center. From there, she
be-
came
direccor
of
degree pro-
grams
at
the chool of
Adult
Education, and mosc recently
served
as
the school
·s assistant
dean.
"Eleanor
is uniquely qual-
ified, both personally
and
professionally,
to
assume this
new position in
adult educa-
tion at Marist,"' said Marc
vanderHeyden, vice president
for
academic affair .
Charwac has
a
bachelor's
degree in political science
from Cornell University, and
in I
9
5 she received her Mas-
ter of Public Administration
degree from Marist.
"
he is familiar with the
college
from both the stu-
dent's and the education pro-
fessional's
perspeccives, •·
vanderHeyden said.
T PEOPLE
Robert].
Grossman
Robert
J.
Grossman
chosen
1988 Teacher of the Year
ROBERT
J.
GRO
MAN,
as-
sociate
professor of
market-
ing, was chosen to
receive the
1988
Teacher
of
the Year
A ward by Marist College
seniors.
Grossman
joined the
Marist
faculty
in 1983
as a
visiting
professor.
He
reaches
undergraduate
courses in bus-
iness
and
society, business
law,
marketing management,
marketing
communications,
and
a
graduate course
in
or-
ganization and
the
environ-
ment.
"The
award
is
perhaps the-
ft
nest honor
I"
ve
ever
re-
ceived," Grossman aid.
Marist appoints new librarian
Grossman received his
B.A.
degree
in 1965 from
Hobart College. He received
a
law degree from the care
University
of
New York
at
Buffalo
chool of Law
in
1969.
In
l 971,
he received
a
postgraduate
degree in
law
from the
ew
York
Univer-
sity chool of Law.
JOHN
MCGJ TY
is Marist's
new librarian. Announcing
the
appointment
last
fall,
Marc A. vanderHeyden, vice
pre idem for
academic affairs,
said, "John McGincy's
experi-
ence in
library
management
and his familiarity with new
technologies u
ed
in the li-
brary make him
an
ideal
addi-
tion co che Marisc
community."
Prior
co joining Mari t,
McGincy was the
associate
librarian
at
Fairfield
niver-
sity in Conneccicuc. He was
in
charge
ofaJI I ibrary depart-
ments and
an annual
budget
in
excess
of
I million. At
Fairfield, McGinty intro-
duced microcomputers into
the
library,
organized
a
microcomputer
lab
for
stu-
dent use, developed informa-
tion services using compact
MARJ T MA AZIN


FALL
1988
john
McGinty
disk technology,
and
mod-
ified
internal
accounting pro-
cedures.
In
addition, he de-
veloped a program for faculty
and student feedback on col-
leccion resources and services.
McGinty"s previous
experi-
ence includes seven years of
service at che University of
Connecticut Health Center
Library and cwo year at rhe
race University of ew York
Medical
Center Library.
McGincy received his
B.A.
degree in anthropology from
olumbia
niversity and his
M.L.S. degree from Rutgers
University. He also holds an
M.B.A. degree from the Uni-
versity of Conneccicut in
Hartford,
where he is a
Ph.D.
degree candidate
in
the higher
education administration
program.
Prior co
joining
Marisc he
held various
faculty and ad-
ministrative positions
at
Brooklyn
ollege.
Throughout his
profes-
sional
career,
he has received
numerous fellowships,
schol-
arships,
honors
and awards,
and
he has been widely
pub-
lished
in
law
and
higher
edu-
cation professional
journals.
Each
spring, the
senior
class at
Marisr
chooses a fac-
ul
cy
member
deserving of the
award. The
award
is
presented
at
the baccalaureate
cere-
monies the
evening
before the
commencement exercises.
"Jr
is
very
exciting for
me
co be
in
the classroom,"
Grossman said. The
award,
he
said, serves as a
kind
of
symmetrical
element
in the
give and
cake
of
teaching and
learning.
"I
got
back as much
as
I
gave,"
he said.
43




























4
MARI
T PEOPL
Eugene Melan elected
Fellow of prestigious
quality control society
Donald Calista receives
Eugene Me/an
EUGENE
MELA
, vi
icing
associate
professor
ofbusi ness
in the
Marisr Division
of
Management Studies, has
been elected a Fellow of rhe
prestigious
American Society
for
Quality
Control (ASQC).
A 13-year member
of the
Society,
Melan received rhe
honor ac
ASQCs Annual
Quality
ongre s in
May
in
Dallas,
Tex., where
he
also
presented a paper. The award
recognizes Melan's
"outstand-
ing
professional work
in
the
areas of quality,
reliability
and quality
improvement, his
technical papers and oral pre-
sentations, his
development
work in computer microelec-
tronics,
and
his
teaching ac-
tivity in the area of quality
improvement
and quantita-
tive
methods
...
A Q has
a
membership
of
more than
50,000 profession-
als dedicated co the advance-
ment
of quality in industry,
government and academia.
Fellow
is
rhe
highest level
of
membership in the society,
and the
honor recognize
out-
srand ing professional ac-
complishment and distinc-
tion. Melan
is the only Fellow
of
the
society
from
the
Hud-
son
Valley region.
Melan has had
a long and
varied career with che
IBM
Corporation. He
was a
mem-
ber
of
the first
generation
computer
design team in the
Poughkeepsie
produce develop-
ment laboratory
after com-
pleting
his
graduate work ac
ew
York University. In his
34 years with
IBM, he
pro-
gressed
through
a number of
different
technical and man-
agement positions in
the
cor-
poration's domestic and world
trade
operations.
Melan has
caught exten-
sively within
the IBM Corpo-
ration as well as at Marisr
College. Regarding his teach-
ing acciviries at
Marisc,
he
said: "I
recognized
the need
for an
individual
co contribute
co society-in
effect each of
us should pay "civic
rent" in
our own way.
Teaching
in
the
management
studies division
was
a
natural way
for
me co
enrich the content of
che
courses and contribute my
experience co
che
younger
generation.
Fulbright
award
Do
ALO
J.
CALJST
A'
as-
sociate professor
of sociology
and
public
administration,
and
director
of
Marisc's
graduate
program in public
administration,
has been
awarded a
prestigious Ful-
bright scholarship co teach
and
lecture
abroad.
Calista will spend nine
months in Japan
beginning
next spring lecturing
and
holding seminars
at
univer-
sities,
as
well
as
speaking
ac
public forums
and with
Japanese journalises. He has
been
co
Japan previously
on
cwo
different
fellowships
Calista,
an expert
in
policymaking,
will focus on
the
differences in Japanese
and American
policymaking,
emphasizing
America's
de-
centralized
approach in
com-
parison with the very
cen-
tralized public policymaking
in
Japan. In
addition,
Calista
is
concerned
with che
effects
of
pose-materialism
on soci-
ety,
and
intends
co
explore
whether post-materialism
is
Donald
J.
Calista
affecting
Japan
as
much
as
it
is affeccing
Westerners. Post-
materialism means that,
under the conditions
of
afflu-
ence,
society's
values will
change coward openness and
less
rigidity.
The
J. William Fulbright
scholarship, established
in
1947,
is the
U.S. govern-
ment's
international educa-
tion
exchange
program. The
scholarship is
awarded
co
students
and teachers co study
or
reach
outside
this
country.
Nationwide,
about 1,000
scholarships are given each
year.
r
0
~
>
.,,
0
0
"'
~
:,:
Cemera appointed
Sacred Heart president
ANTHO
J. CER
ERA, for-
merly vice
president
for
col-
lege
advancement ac
Marisr,
assumed the presidency of
Sacred Heart University
in
Bridgeport, Conn., in July.
ernera served in several
administrative positions at
Marisc
over
the
course of
seven
years, including executive
assistant
co the president,
assistant
vice president
for
academic affairs, and
vice
g
president for
college advance-
~
ment from
1985. Under
his
~
leadership,
the area
of college
-.
____
_,,. advancement
ac Marisc
experi-
Antho11y].
Cernera
enced
significant
growth.
The number
of
donors in-
creased
more than
78
percent,
and
the Marist Fund saw
a 44
percent increase.
ernera
was
an active
par-
ticipant in
ocher areas
of the
college and
rhe
community
as
well. He was
a
highly re-
spected
teacher in the Marist
philosophy
department, and
his publications have included
articles
on world hunger
and
global education
in
World-
wright:
A Rheu»·ic Reader
fa,·
Global
A11
1
arenm,
published
by Ma rise College,
and
Maris
I
Today.
MARI
T MAGAZINE•
FALL
1988





































Evelyn
Rimai
Fisher
remembered
Evelyn Rimai FiJher, profeuor
e111e,•it11s
of art and design conwl-
tanl al Mal'ist, died May
30,
1987,
after wo,·king
al Ma,·isl for
30
years. She uw
75
years old.
Evelyn
seemed to have been
everywhere
and
lo
have had
P
hand
in everything
al
Marist. Begi11ni11g
in the
s11m111er
of 19
5
7,
she de-
signed the
i111erior
and exterior
colors of Fontaine
Hedi
which, al
the
time, was a residence
for the
Marist Brothe,·s
at whet/ was then
MPri,m College. he did the
same.
and much more, dllring
the
co11-
stmctio11
of
DMnelly Hall.
And
she
not
only designed; she
co11-
s1mcted.
he
po,wed
concrete
and
welded railingJ,
A.r
Maris!
grew
andcha11ged,
Evelyn was involved
in
the redesigning
and 1·ern,mmc-
tion
of
Donnelly Hall
and
111a11y
other buildings.
Last
May
5
ell a 111e111arial
service
for Evelyn in
the
campus
chapel,
Mm·ist
Chief Pina11cied
Officer
Anthony Campi/ii and
Marist Brother Joseph Belanger
delivered
two
of fo11r trib11tes
to
Evelyn. Campi/ii ?,md11ated
from
Marist
in
1962
and began his
career
al
Maris!
after that,
Bt·othe,·
Joseph
is ,. 1948 Mariem College
grad11ate
and joined
the
Ma,·isl
famlty as a French i11Slmctor
i11
1959.
He
is
Ctm'l!11tly
fl
professor
ofFrmch.
Beloweu-eexce,ptsf,-0111
their
lrib11tes.
The
flm
one
is
by
Campi/ii ,/111/ol{)ed
by the u,m·ds
uf
Brother J11seph.
EVELYN
fl HER
pa sed away
after
having
given almost 30
years of her life
co the
spiric and
growth of
Marist
College.
It
is
djfficult
co say when
I
actually
mec
·velyn, and
under
what circumstances,
but
l
can
recall
as a
student, this woman
who
walked around
Donnelly
Hall-then
under
construc-
tion-with
a
clipboard and
who
created
the stained
glass
mosaic on che windows thatare
now
pare of the Computer
cncer
facing
Adrian
Hall.
I
remember
che
velyn
Fisher who saw
everything as a
MARI T MAGAZI
E

FALL
l988
MARI
Evelyn Rimai
Fi!her
potencial sculpture or
work
of
art, and who
had the
courage
and conviction co
make
a
state-
ment
wich her
arc.
he was
aware of
her
admirers,
and her
critics. She would say,
"lf
it
causes
someone co stop,
look
and perhaps
make
an evaluation
as co what
the
sculpture
was,
or
just
ro
think
about
it-whether
they
liked ic
or
nor-then
ic
did irs
job."
I
can remember
the days
when we
had
to
puc
railings
around
Donnelly
Hall
or on
stairways
throughout
the
cam-
pus for
the
safety and
protecrion
of the
students.
It
could never
be
just an ordinary
railing; ir
had co become part of
the
theme,
a chemeofche
building
or
the
surrounding area. The
welders
constructing
these rail-
ings
sometimes balked, but
after ir
was
finished,
they would
comment, "Hey,
this
doesn't
look halfbad
1"
Her designs had
strucrural
integrity while being
aesthetically pleasing.
I
can
recall
the
Evelyn
Fisher
who, after
putting
in
a full day
of classes
with
her
students,
would
stay
ro
work
on a
design
or
building project
for
the
ad-
ministration.
It was not un-
common
co see
the
lights on
in
Evelyn's office
well
into
the
evening.
I
also
remember
che
velyn
Pisher as she coped
with
her
illness. he
was graceful for
any
telephone
call or
visit, no mat-
ter how
brief it might have
been.
Always,
always,
she never
talked about
herself
but
of
how
things
were
at
the
college
or
of
how
you and your family
were
T PEOPLE
and what
kind
of
day
one
had.
lt
never
failed
that in crying
to
lift
her
spirits with
a
visit, the
visitor
goc
the
uplift,
witness-
ing her
courage,
unselfishness
and
acceptance of the
real i ry
of
her
situation.
We
often speak of the
heri-
tage
of
this
college and
the
contributions
of the
Marist
Brothers.
I
would
like
to
add a
name to that heritage,
and
chat
is of Evelyn Fisher. he
was of
the Marist Brothers'
era and
ubscribed co
al
I
that
was
a part
of
rhat heritage.
The
Marisc
Brothers
and
the
college admin-
istration chose
her
to
become
a
part
of rheir
team
to move this
college forward.
Her untiring
efforts
on
behalf
of
the
college'
bricks
and
mortar
her
ability
to reach
and
inspire
her
stu-
dents,
her
abil icy co create and
see beauty
and an
in
all
things,
her untiring
work ethic and
most imporcanr, her dedica-
tion
co
the
ideals that
arist
aspires to,
entitle
her to be
a
part
of
that
heritage.
WHAT
PR!
G
TO
MIND
at
the thought
of
Evelyn
is com-
mitment.
She
gave
herself
wholehearted! y,
spontane-
ously,
immediately
in
the
philosophical sense
of
that
word, to
whatever she did:
painting,
writing,
purchasing,
designing, teaching, most
of
all
just
plain being,
being
herself so
as
to
be for ochers.
She
was
there.
Nil us
(Donnelly)
and
l
could
nor remember
a
single
day she was
absent,
and
we are
talking
of 30 and
more
years.
And Evelyn'
commitment
was nor
the
dutiful, legal,
servile, functionary
type.
It
was
creative,
inspired. The
old-timers among
us
will recall
a certain
ptosaicnes
to
the
campus.
Oh
yes,
there
were,
thank God, Gerry
Weiss·
flower beds
everywhere.
Bur
the
older
buildings
themselves
were monkish, functional
things.
Evelyn
instilled
a
sense
of design,
of
beauty.
When
Champagnat was
planned,
the
gallery
lounge
was her idea,
and
we still mar-
vel
today at
the rime
and energy
she put
into
those monthly
hangings
and
re
eptions over
LS
years.
I
miss
them, Evelyn.
A
baccle-fatigued
teachers
struggling
to shape tomorrow's
generation,
we
can still learn
much from Evelyn's 15-credit
courses
in
creative coping
which
she
initiated
and
directed
wich
rhe help
of
Norm
Olin
and
Ron Pasquariello
and
John
ullivan,
and the course on
painters
and
poets with Milton
Te.ichman,
forming studenrs'
hearrs
and
minds
on campu ,
while Mal Mi
helson
formed
chem
off campus in inner-
ity
projects.
How
I
thank God
for
che
prophetic vision
of
Linus
Foy (Marisr
College
Pre
idem
from
1958
co
1979)
who, like
mmanucl
Mounier, several
years before
Vatican
II
wanted
an ecumenical "Catholic" col-
lege
where
all people of good
will, whatever
their
religious
persuasion or
none
ac all, could
work
shoulder
co
shoulder
to
build
a
better
world.
ln
his
oral
hiscory, Linus
paid eloquent
triburecoEvelyn,
in tinctively
and
rightfully
singling her out
as
the
type of
person he wanted
to found
Marist College with
him: nor rhe scereocypical pro-
fe sor,
but
the
unusual,
the
inspiring,
che creative
indi-
vidual.
Thi
rype
he
found
preeminently
in
Evc::lyn.
l
remember once Evelyn
stopping
me
on a campus road
and celling
me, deeply
con-
cerned, co stop
my
hectic
pace
of
life
,nd smell
che
roses.
I
cold her
that
I
did stop, totally,
foran
hour
each
day
to
medicate
and
recollect
at
Mass
and ocher
prayers.
he nodded
apprecia-
tively
and aid,
'That's
good,
I
was
nor
aware of chat."
he
may not have understood the
Mass,
but she
her
elf lived
instinctively a
deep, spiricual
life
and
recognized
and ac-
cepted
it
in one
varied
form or
another.
Humans
are
not primarily
matter.
pirit informs. And
your spirit, Evelyn,
still
lives.
Ir
lives
in
rhe
sculptures and
mosaics
and
paintings
and
poems you created;
it
lives
even
more
so in the
hearts
of your
students and fellow
workers.
May
we all, young
and
old,
learn from you whac
we
arc all
about,
what life
is all abouc.
45




















46
MARI
T
p
0
PL E
Adult graduates
honor families in
"Putting Him/Her Through" ceremony;
one graduate offers his reflections
JOSEPH
STEFI\NI,
~1
1988
Ma,-isl
graduate, gave
a moving
tribute to his wife, jean, and
their joint
efforts
to eam his
degree at a
special
graduation
ceremony
last sp,,i,,g. Called the
PHT ('·P111ti11g
Him/Her
Through") ceremony, it was an
opportunity
f()Y
gmduates
eurolled
in the School
of Adult Education,
most of whom are part-time
1111-
dents with full-time jobs, to
honor those
who had helped make
their
graduation
poJSib!e.
Stefani,
36,
who
graduated
with honors, earned a Bachelor
of Science
degree
in
bminess with
a marketing
concentration.
It is
a degree that took
10
years of
pan-time college
to
complete.
Employed
at
1
BM in Fishkill as
a p,·od11ction
operator
(jean is
also employed
at
IBM
in
Fishkill), he
said
that in spite
of the trials and
sacrifices
that
are often part of the life of a
fut!-time worker and part-time
studet11,
he's
going
to do it again.
Asked if he's iruemted in
p11rming
any other degree,
Stefani
said. "Oh
yes indeed, probably a
few more-evenwatly." Among
the degrees
he's considering
is a
master', degree in i11d111trial
administration or maybe a doctor-
ate in bmiuess administration.
An a,piring writer by avoca-
tion, Stefani has tried his hand
at both fiction and no11-fie1
ion
and wishes he had more time to
write. Thereco,tld
be; hedidu,y
that
"maybe
after the next degree
for u•ork. I'll do
one/or
f,111,
maybe English or history."
Below are
excerpts
from te-
fani's
PHT
spee.h:
WELL, IT' ALLOVER, fellow
graduaces-and
high time,
coo. Congratulations
co us
all. Ir's been a long rime
coming
1
l
don'c know abouc
you, bur I've been at this
student business for 10 years.
How many people can say
they've
_been
a graduating
Joseph Stefani cmd his wife, Jean.
senior for more
than
rwo
years, and char they're proud
of ic;,
Tonight,
we honor, and
thank, those people who have
supported us while we have
been Marisr students.
If
I
may, I'd
like
co begin by
offering my personal
thanks
to
the adult education office
staff. These people truly un-
derstand the special needs
of---and
the
exra burdens char
can be placed on---adult stu-
dents. They ueac us with
unflagging respect, and have
an uncanny way of boosting
our confidence.
As
I mentioned before, my
career
as
a student has been a
long one, and a hard one.
But
I
cannot consider Satmday co
be my graduation day, no
maccer what the accomplish-
ment.
lr
is, rather, our gradu-
ation day. My wife
Jean's
and
mme.
This past year may have
been the roughest.
I've been
working
nights
and raking
classes days. My wife and 1
would see each ocher on
weekends-if
I wasn't work-
ing overtime. But we all know
that
it's not
easy going co
school, working, and trying
co maintain some semblance
of a normal home life. We've
asked ourselves co squeeze 25
hours of
life
from each day.
Something had co suffer.
Work couldn't suffer be-
cause we are all providing for
today. School couldn't suffer
because our
intent
was co
provide for tomorrow.
The
normal home
life,
then, be-
comes the sacrifice for our
drive co succeed. In our case,
an abnormal home life has
become normal.
The truth is that our
priorities have changed. They
had ro. Adult students are a
different breed, a driven
breed, a sometimes difficult
breed. College was something
we wanted
to
do, not had
to
do. It was a decision we made,
not one char was made for us.
And once the decision was
made, we knew we had
to
do
our best co make you all proud
of us.
I
know I
wouldn't have
done as well, and may not
have done chis ac all, without
Jean's
love
and support.
I like co think chat I have
been building a house of sores.
I had che desire, the cools and
the skills.
But
without my
wife
to
supply the foundation
and building blocks, would I
have been as successful?
Our house has caken years
co build. le cook swear, deter-
mination and Strength.
ow
chat
the trim is painted and
the house is finally complete,
I know that
Jean is
proud of
me for building ic. As
I
am
proud of her for helping. As
we are all proud of you.
You've given us all we've
needed or asked for and more.
You've
given willingly, even
when understanding
the sac-
rifices char would have co be
made, and how long rhe sac-
rifices would endure. And
despite knowing whac's in
store for us, some of us are
crazy enough to prolong it
all, and enroll in graduate
school.
Bur it's over for now, even
if
temporarily.
Some of us
will go home and enjoy a
sic-down dinner.
ome of us
will
notice
that the house
needs painting or the
lawn
needs mowing.
till others
may notice char
their
children
are bigger than the lase rime
they looked. I intend co rein-
troduce myself to my wife.
MARIST MAGAZI
E

FALL
1988





















s
PORTS
The end of an era:
Rik
Smits leaves Marist
for the Indiana Pacers
ON
MAY
2
L, 1988,
Marist
College
commencement
day,
a four-year record for Marisc
basketball
ended
when Rik
Smits crossed
the
platform in
the McCann Center and
ac-
cepted his diploma. Tho
e
four years may be written
down
as
the mo t memorable
in Marisr
ollege basketball
history.
Rik Smits,
a
7' 4"
center for
Marisc
ollege, was the sec-
ond
pick of rh
ari nal Bas-
ketball Association
BA)
drafr, and is now
an
Indiana
Pacer. His
career at
Marisc
was more than
exciting;
it
gave the college national
ex-
posure and turned an un-
known young basketball
player from Eindhoven,
Netherlands
into
an
BA
rookie.
Smits started his
career at
Marist in the
1984/1985
sea-
son at 17 years old wirh
only
rwo years ofbaskerball experi-
ence behind him.
(He
played
for the Dutch national ream.)
His statistics had improved
from
11.2
points,
5.6
re-
bounds,
2.6
blocks per
game
his freshman
year
to
24. 7
points,
8.
7
rebounds, and
3.9
blocks per
game
in his
senior year.
Bur
what made
an
Eastern
Collegiate Athletic Confer-
ence-Metro
Division
l player
so spectacular? It seems that
all the scours agree:
It
was his
height
and
natural ability
co
run checourt, and his dedica-
tion
co
the spore. Smits not
only
improved in four years,
according
to
Marist
coach
Dave Magaricy. He improved
m
every game.
mies has been
called
a
"project"
by the
BA scouts,
a
term used by the coaches
to
describe
a
player who needs
to
improve in
certain
aspect
of rhe
game
before he will be
truly useful co the ream. The
Pacers see mies as a project
well worth the
effort.
With
few center as
rail
as
7
'4",
mies will be
a
noticeable
addition
ro
the
NBA.
And,
according
co
some scours, in
ab
ur five
years
may be
one
of
the besc
centers
in years.
aid one sport
writer
about
Smits joining rhe
BA:
"He
will
get
bear up
a
bit
and
cake
hislurnpsasarookie,
bucby
season's end
he will have made
an
impact,
and
by his chi rd
year
in the
league
he will be
among the
BA's cop five
centers.
He
can
score, re-
bound and
block shoes, but
he need to improve his pass-
rng.
;:;
The Pacers
are counting
on
z
h
.
=
t at improvement; they were,
~
of course, impres ed with
8
mies
from the
scan.
~
"A player
like him
comes
Off to
work.
Rik
mits
receiver along once every 20 years,"
his diploma from Marist
College
said Pacer
'General
anager
President Dennis
J.
Mtmay.
Donnie Walsh.
MARI T MAGAZINE•
FALL 1988
Rik Smits, known as the
"Dunking
Dutchman," is now playing
for
the
Indiana Parers.
··A
player like
him comes
a/011g
once eve,y
20
years." said
Pacen' General Mm1ager Donnie Walsh.
Rik mils
at
the
ational
Basketball
AssociatiOll
draft in
ew
York City
talking with officials of
the lndi~ma Pacm
shortly after he was chosen to
play
for
the team.
47


















48
SPORTS
Marist equestrian
team rides to the top
by MercedeJ
M. Ca,·dona
JUST
CALL
the group of horse
riders from Marist
College
"the
little
team that could."
Members
of
the
equestrian
team
rescheduled
final exams
and defeated a
regional
cham-
pion to participate
in
the
15th Intercollegiate
ational
Championship
Horse
Show
last May,
placing sixth in
three events and eighth in
another. The
ream
competed
against about 260
riders
from
across the country at
the
event
in Laurinburg,
.C.
"It
was
rough competition
down
there. It
was
the
tough-
est we'd seen all year," said
team member
John rruzzieri.
Team
captain Ginger
Mion
agreed, saying, "We
were
up
against
the
best of the
best."
Mion
rook
eighth
in the
novice fence-jumping category.
To win a spot in the
na-
tional competition, Marisr
had
co bear three-year cham-
pion
Pace
University
at
last
April's
regional competition.
MariJI
eq11est,-ia11
team membe,•
]oh11
Stmzzie,·i
shows off
Crescendo
al
the
Rose
View Stables in
Hyde Pa,·k,
.
Y. The
eq11e1trian
team.
which was
s1a1-ted
in
1983
by
Joyce Knox,
placed high in the Intercollegiate
atio11al
Champio11Jhip
laJI May. Stmzzieri,
'91,
from
P0Nghkeep1ie,
placed
Jixth
in the top cl11ss
open
compel
it ion
againJI 260 riderJ
from acroJJ
the
country.
A quick look
at the year
in
Marist Sports
ropolitan Conference. Kindra
Predmore,
'9
I,
placed
first
in
the 100-
and 200-meter
but-
terfly
at
the Metropolitan
Conference. Coach Doug
Backlund
ended
his
fir
t
sea-
son
as
Conference Coach
of
the Year.
Keenan
completed
hi Marisr
career as
best
defensive
player
at
Marisr. His brother, Brian,
'89,
has rerurned
this
fall
as
a
defensive
back.
Crew
Women's Tennis
Ending a successful
season
with
a 7-6 overall
record, the
Marist women's tennis team
placed third
in
their confer-
ence
tournament. Allison
Block,
'88,
left
Marist with
an
impressive three-year re-
cord of 32-8.
Women's Swimming
The
1987 /88 season
was
the Marist
women's
most
successful yet. The ream
placed
first in
its division and
second
in
the
entice
Met-
ropolitan
Conference. Two
Marist women obrained im-
pressive
viccories. Lisa
Burgbacher,
'89,
was named
Diver
of
the Year by
the
Met-
Lacrosse
The Marist
lacrosse
ream
had
a
fine
season
with
a
record
of8-3.
They
ended
che Knick-
erbocker
Conference with
a
6-2 final
record.
Men's Swimming
Ending the
season
with
a
7-3
record, the Marist men
placed third
out
of 18 in the
Merropolitan
onference.
Twelve school records
and
5
7
individual
records
were
set
at
the
conference.
Football
The 1987
/88
season
ended
with
a 2-7
record
for the
Marist
team.
enior
Chris
Marist once
again com-
pleted
a good
season
and cook
home the
trophy for
first
place in
the
President's Cup
Regatra, which was held
April
30 at
Marist.
Soccer
In
his
26th season coach
Howard Goldman led the
Marist soccer team to
a
5-10-2
regular season record
and a
3-3 ECAC
Metro Conference
record.
Women's Basketball
With
an overall
record of
9-19 and a 6-10 ECA
Metro
Conference record, che
women's basketball team
placed
fifth
in
the conference.
oach Ed Calabre e
aid
Pace has
an established
equestrian ream
that
practices
three times a week, while
Marisr riders
practice rogerher
only once a week.
"Ir's
the first year for Marist
ro
get
that far
in the regionals,
so
it
was a
real learning
experi-
ence for some people," truz-
zieri aid.
He
placed sixth
among all
riders in
the cop-
class open
equitation.
In
addition ro
the
competi-
tion
from Pace University,
the
riders
had another oppo-
nent
to
beat: the school calen-
dar.
"Abom
half rhe
ream had
co move
their
finals," said
Mion.
The
experience
of meering
riders
from all over the coun-
try will
help rhe ream
mem-
bers
co
improve
their riding,
Mion
said.
And
they'll be
back, she said.
"
ow that
we
know what
it
feels
like,
we want
to
keep
on doing ir," she said.
Reprinted
from The
Poughkeepsie Journal.
Men's
Basketball
Led by
coach
Dave Ma-
gariry,
the
1987 /88
season
ended
with an 1
-9
overall
record
and a
13-3 ECAC-
Merro Divi ion
I Conference
record.
enior
Rik mies be-
came
the second draft pick of
the National Ba kerball As-
sociation
and
shed his Marisr
red
and
white for the Indiana
Pacers' blue
and gold. (See
feature on Smits, page
47.)
Marisr retired three ream
members' numbers rhis
year:
number
45,
belonging
to
Rik
Smits; number
3,
belonging
to
Drafton Davis,
'88; and
number 12,
belonging ro
ceve mith,
'83,
who was
Mari r's
all-time
leading
scorer.
Volleyball
Under rhe direction
of
Viccor VanCarpels, the
women's
volleyball
team
closed
out
the
eason with a
22-23
record.
MARJ T MA
AZI E

FALL 1988


cover
pg 1
pg 2
pg 3
pg 4
pg 5
pg 6
pg 7
pg 8
pg 9
pg 10
pg 11
pg 12
pg 13
pg 14
pg 15
pg 16
pg 17
pg 18
pg 19
pg 20
pg 21
pg 22
pg 23
pg 24
pg 25
pg 26
pg 27
pg 28
pg 29
pg 30
pg 31
pg 32
pg 33
pg 34
pg 35
pg 36
pg 37
pg 38
pg 39
pg 40
pg 41
pg 42
pg 43
pg 44
pg 45
pg 46
pg 47
pg 48