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MaristMagazine2012Spring

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Part of 2012 Spring

content

Homecoming
&
Reunion Weekend
i September 22-23
Classes of 194 -1967, 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002
&
2007
Ref:lect
Reunions; mark a time for alumni to celebrate their place in Marist's history,
reflect on what Marist has meant to them, and renew ties to their alma mater.
Rec:onnect
Each yea1r,
Marist alumni come together to commemorate their past,
connect with the College of today, and commit to investing in its future.
Rein ember
The Mari st Fund is a significant priority for reunion giving. The fund
supports the core needs of education and provides unrestricted dollars
for student scholarships, attracting and retaining world-class faculty,
and devefoping innovative academic programs.
MARI
STFUNJD2012
A gift in honor of your reunion is a personal
way to make a meaningful commitment to
Marist, and many alumni choose to combine their annual Marist Fund support
with an additio1nal commitment to The Campaign for Marist.
For more infornnation on the Marist Fund Reunion Campaign and Homecoming
&
Reunion Weelkend activities, visit www.marist.edu/alumni.





































1ST
CONTENTS
SPECIAL
ISSUE
4
$1S0
Million and Counting:
The Campaign
for Marist
Surpasses
its Goal
and Continues
Through
December
31, 2012
On
the
cover:
Pictured are examples of the many ways
The Campaign for Marist has made an impact at Marist
College. Featured students
include
DeborahAkinwunmi
'\4(upper right), Ryan Hoff man'\ 2(1ower
left),and
Alexa
Ritz '12 (lower right).
Marist is dedicated to helping students develop the
intellect and character required for enlightened,
ethical, and productive lives in the global
community of the 21st century.
Marist
magazine
is published by the Office of
College Advancement at Maris! College for alumni
and friends of Maris! College.
Vice President for College Advancement:
Christopher De/Giorno
'88
Editor:
Leslie
Bates
Executive Director of Alumni
Relations:
Amy Coppola Woods
'97
Alumni News Coordinator:
Donna Watts
Art Director: Richard Deon
Marist College
3399 North Rd.
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-1387
www.marist.edu
editor@marist.edu
<}~
MIX
..,J
,_,.)
Paper from
F SC
responsible sources
•••
~
••
FSC- C106861
Women's Basketball
Team
Wins MAAC
Championship for Seventh
Straight
Year
The Red Foxes capture their eighth Metro
Atlantic Athletic Conference title overall,
while Brian Giorgis is named MAAC Coach
of the Year
for the sixth time and wins his
250th game in
10
years as head coach.
DEPARTMENTS
MARIST
DR
2
Marist Drive
What's happening on campus
18
Alumni
News & Notes
Updates on Marist graduates
Biology major
Nicole Lamorte
'12
plans to continue
working with
animals after
graduation.
Page
11



















































I
:MARIST
D
'
,.
,.
C
Online
MA in Integrated
Marketing
Communication
Launch4!d
l\1AHIST
-
0
---
M
A RIST HAS LAUNCHED
a
master
of
arts program
in integrated
mar-
keting communication
that
is completely
online and can
be
completed
in
one year.
Led
by faculty who have considerable
industry experience,
IMC
is
designed
to
develop leaders who can create and
man-
age an
integrated
customer contact strategy
across a wide variety of media.
Course
topics
range from using
social media effectively to the design and
analysis of marketing research. Classes
include Principles of Integrated Marketing
Communication, Social Media Strategies
and Tactics, Advertising Management,
Public Relations Management, Marketing
Research,
Marketing Foundations, Brand
Management,
and Global Consumer
Insights.
Steven
Ralston,
dean of
the
School of
Communication and the Arts, reports that
within
the
next five years IMC will be criti-
cal to people working in the fields of public
relations, advertising, brand management,
corporate communication,
and
marketing.
New classes
begin
every Sep-
tember
amd
January. Applications
are acce·pted year-round with a
fall dead line of Aug.
1
and a spring
deadline
of Dec.
1.
Full-time
students starting in
fall can complete the
program the
following summer. Part-time stu-
dents starting in fall can complete
the
prog:ram in two years.
The format features two rounds
of courses, each lasting eight weeks,
in fall and spring semesters, and
two rounds
in
summer, each lasting
six weeks. Full-time students will gener-
ally take four courses
in
fall (two
in
each
round), four in spring, and
two
in summer.
Part-tim,e students will generally take two
courses in fall, two
in
spring, and one in
summer of each year.
The current tuition rate is $695 per
credit, wiith
30
credit hours required for the
Home
Away
from Honrae
---i,..-~'---
...
--
..
----··
------·--
----·-
..
---·
---·----
·---------
...
___
.,
___
_
_
..
_____
_
_
.,
___
....
_____
.....
_
...
.,.
________
_
________
,,,
__
·-------
degree. Anyone with a bachelor's degree
from an accredited college/university
is
eligible to apply.
To find more
information,
including
course descriptions and sample schedules,
and to apply, visit www.marist.edu/admis-
sion/graduate/integratedmarketingcom-
munication.

Members of the Mari st College Habitat for Humanity chapter spent Spring Break
2012
building a
house in Punta Gorda, FL. The
22
Marist students andl
3
staff members joined the Charlotte County
Habitat chapter in the project and stayed in the local chapter's volunteer lodging. Mari
st
alumni in
the area joined the group for a picnic one afternoon.
2
MARIST
MAGAZINE

































ENTERPRISE CO:\IPUTIKG
RESEARCH L\BORATORY
\Lide Possibl~ bv Funding
from the
'.'\,11ional Sci~nc~ Foundation
Marist Continues Development
of High-Performance
Computing Platform
M
ARIST COLLEGE TOOK DELIVERY
of two
high-performance IBM z114 mainframes
over the winter break to continue the successful
Marist/IBM Joint Study program and expand its
capacity to undertake new research with other
industry and academic partners.
Thanks to a $678,883 grant from the
National Science Foundation's Major Research
Instrumentation
Program, the School of
Computer Science and Mathematics was able
to purchase a new IBM z114 mainframe with
a zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension (zBX),
making Marist the first college or university
in the world to install this combination. The
zBX is new infrastructure that makes it possible
to deploy an integrated hardware platform by
joining mainframe and distributed technologies
together in order to begin replacing individual
islands of computing to reduce complexity,
improve security, and bring applications closer
to the data they need.
Marist's
Information
Technology
Department helped install the mainframe and
the zBX in an NSF-sponsored research labo-
ratory in the College's new Hancock Center.
The lab, funded in part by a $696,931 grant
from NSF's Academic Research Infrastructure
Program, is the center of research and related
activities for the School of Computer Science
and Mathematics.
Faculty and students requiring high-per-
formance computational devices, data storage,
network facilities, and access to other research
facilities via Internet2 and the commodity
Internet will be able to conduct research in the
lab and on the new z114 mainframe. Beyond
the Marist community, the mainframe will
provide a platform for the 1,000-plus members
of the global enterprise computing community
to conduct research, develop new technologies,
and train
staff.

C)OY
Jl(K,[111
Marist's
Online
MBA,
Online
Liberal
Studies
Bachelor's
Ranked
Top
Online
Education
Programs
by
U.S.
News
&
World
Report
T
wo
MARIST COLLEGE ONLINE DEGREE PROGRAMS,
the master of
business
administration (MBA) and the
bachelor
of arts/bachelor of science in
lib-
eral studies,
have
been named
in
the first-ever edition of
Top
Online Education
Program rankings
by
U.S. News & World Report. USNews
considered graduate
on
line
degree programs in business, engineering,
nursing,
education, and
computer information technology as well as online bachelor's
degree programs.
Marist's online MBA was one of only 14 graduate
business programs in
the nation
named
to
USNews's
honor roll.
USNews
considered admissions
selectivity, faculty credentials and training, student services and technology,
and teaching
practices
and student engagement.
In
the area of admissions
selectivity, Marist
ranked
fifth, and
in
faculty credentials, Marist ranked sixth.
Marist launched New York State's first AACSB-accredited online MBA
program in
1998. It was also one of the first
,---
such programs
in the nation,
The
AACSB
is
,---r
r
r
A /\.
'(
s
[3
the
premier
business
school accrediting
body,
M
Also known as the Association to Advance
INTlRNATIONAL
"These rankings
confirm the
dedication to
innovation and
quality long
associated with
Marist College and
our MBA program."
-Elmore
Alexander,
Dean, School of
Management
Collegiate Schools of Business, it accredits fewer than
one third of
business
programs
in
the world.
"These
rankings
confirm the
dedication
to
innova-
tion
and
quality
long associated with Marist College
and our MBA
program,"
says Elmore Alexander,
dean
of
the
School of Management. "With our emphasis
on selectivity and faculty expertise as well as the
new
program emphasizing management
in
the virtual world,
Marist's MBA engages the issues that define contem-
porary
global
management
in a world-class online
environment." Information on
the
MBA
program is
available
at www.marist.edu/mba.












4
MARIST
V.A
Al "IE
Cover
Story
$15
Million
Counting:
and Continues Through
December
31, 2012










T
he Campaign for Marist, the College's first
comprehen-
sive fund-raising campaign,
has
surpassed its ambitious
$150
million
goal ahead of schedule. The campaign will con-
clude on Dec.
31, 2012.
"Marist
has
come such a long way, and
this
campaign
has played a significant role in
its
growth and
development,"
says Tim Brier '69, Marist
trustee
and chair of The Campaign
for Marist. "It's especially gratifying to see so
many
alumni,
parents,
and friends support this special effort. I continue to
be amazed by
the many
ways this campaign
is transforming
the
College. Every gift has an impact, and
I hope
that everyone
takes the
opportunity to participate."
The
campaign opened
in
2005
with a goal of
$75
million.
An initial quiet phase raised
$45
million through
outstanding
leadership from
the
Board of Trustees, alumni,
parents,
and
friends of
the
College. A public launch at a reception in New
York City followed in
2007.
Two years later, the ca1mpaign
received an extraordinary bequest from the estate of
Raymond
A. Rich, the largest gift in
the
history of Marist.
The
bequest
consisted of the Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne Mansion, a
historic
waterfront estate on
60
acres in Esopus, NY, with
a value estimated at
$65
million,
and
$10
million
in cash to
enable the
development
of the Raymond A.
Rich Institute
for
Leadership
Development.
Subsequently,
the goal was doubled
to
$150
million.
"Reaching this
historic
benchmark was a mornumental
step forward for the
College
and a moment to be cel«~brated,"
says Chris
DelGiorno
'88, vice president for college a1dvance-
ment. "As we embark on the final year of the campaign,
the
College
is moving
forward with both tremendous
pride in
all that
has
been accomplished and continued enthusiasm
for what
lies
ahead."
Already the campaign has made an impact on every
level
of
college
life.
Capital projects
have included
the Hancock Center,
the Lower Fulton Townhouses,
the
pedestrian walkway
under
Route
9, gates at each campus entrance, chemistry labs, reno-
vations to the
historic
Cornell Boathouse, and major upgrades
and an addition
to the
James
J.
McCann
Recreation
Center.
Support for scholarships, teaching, and research is benefiting
students through 38 new endowed funds and
increases
in 37
existing endowments. Investments
in
faculty
include
a
profes-
sorship in
Hudson River
Valley
history.
Campaign support
is
bolstering the work of Marist's premier centers of excel-
lence,
the Marist
Institute
for Public Opinion and the Hudson
River
Valley Institute, as well as other centers still becoming
established. Prestigious grants from federal agencies such as
the National Science Foundation
have
provided funding
in
several areas of need
including
technology infrastructure.
The campaign promises more excitement. The
remaining
months of
2012
will bring construction of a
building dedicated
to Marist's Music Department and a major
renovation
and
expansion of
the
Student Center that
includes
a new dining
hall and additional meeting and gathering space for students.
For more on these
projects,
and for
reflections
from President
Dennis J. Murray on The Campaign for Marist and a summary
of campaign achievements, please see the following
pages and
also www.marist.edu/capitalcampaign.
SPRING
2012
5





























1-
z
c.:
2
<
2
C
C
,r
V
Reflections
on The Campaign
for Marist:
AQ&Awith
President
Dennis
J.
Murray
Marist
magazine
asked
Marist President
Dennis
J.
Murray
to reflect
on the importance
of The Campaign
for Marist
as it enters
the final stretch.
MM:
Why is The Campaign for Marist sig-
nificant?
DJM:
The
Campaign for Marist is important,
first of all,
because
it is
the
College's first truly
comprehensive
campaign. We
have had
some
very successful
fund-raising
projects,
such as
our great library, which really transformed
Marist. But
this
is the first time we have
tried
to
complete a campaign that
impacted
virtu-
ally every aspect of
the institution.
Truly, we
have done that,
through everything from
our academic
programs,
to the accessibility
that we
have
provided for future students
through endowed scholarship
programs,
to
great
new
buildings like the Hancock Center,
to an improved campus environment with
the walkway under Route 9 connecting the
east and west parts of our campus. And we
received a wonderful gift from Raymond A.
Rich to establish a
leadership
institute. This
gift was not only a great,
historic,
physical
structure in the Colonel Oliver Hazard Payne
Mansion
but also an endowment to support
leadership programming at the College. This
campaign
has touched
every aspect of Marist
College.
MM:
How
would you characterize the
overall
impact
of
this
effort and
the
ways
it has
enhanced and enriched the Marist
community?
DJM:
The fact that we have not only met but
surpassed our
$150
million goal has truly
made a statement about Marist and how
quickly
this College has risen to the ranks
of the very best colleges and universities in
America. When we started the campaign we
though1t
a realistic goal would probably be
$50
mill.ion-at
least
that is what the consul-
tants recommended-but with the support of
our boaird and alumni, we increased
that
goal
to
$75
million, and now we
have
surpassed
our goa
I
of
$150
million.
This has truly
been
a transtormative
part
of our history.
MM:
One of the extraordinary outcomes of
the campaign
has
been the groundswell of
support. More
than
13,000
alumni, parents,
friends, corporations, and foundations have
support,ed
the
campaign since
the
2008
fiscal
year.
DJM:
It has been a
tremendous
effort. Marist,
in comparison
to
the institutions we compete
against, is still a relatively young
institution,
and so when we look at this outpouring of
support from alumni, parents, and friends-
who in many cases have just adopted Marist
College because they truly believe
in
what
is
happeniing here,
in
the culture and values of
the institution, and most importantly in
the
quality alumni that we turn out here-that
has perihaps been the
most
gratifying part
of the campaign. Not only
have
we attained
and surpassed a very significant goal,
but
that goa
I
has been surpassed
because
of very
broad-based participation from virtually
every aspect of our college community.
MM:
What are some of the aspects of
the
campaign
that
you are proud of?
DJM:
Academics are stronger, and our facili-
ties really support teaching and
learning
and
create
a
good living environment for our
students. Endowed scholarships are going
to allow many students who otherwise would
not have
been
able
to
attend Marist College
now to have that as an option.
I
am a big
believer that
colleges and universities have to
do a
better
job at helping to
produce
leaders
at every level of our society. We hope the
Rich
Institute
and our opportunities
to
integrate
leadership
training into
many aspects of
Marist College will help contribute to that
national need.
And of course there is the physical
plant. The Marist Brothers gave
us many
good things that we have
built upon,
and
they certainly chose a
beautiful
site for a col-
lege here on the banks of the
Hudson.
We
have capitalized on
that,
and reoriented
the
campus towards the river. Building
academic
facilities
like
the Hancock Center,
improv-
ing
laboratories
as we
have
done
in
Donnelly
Hall,
increasing
our computer offerings, and
offering our students and faculty one of the
most sophisticated
networks
in the world
for
their teaching, learning,
and
research
all
have contributed
to
making Marist the very
first-rate
institution it
is today.
MM:
One of the other wonderful outcomes
of
the
campaign has been increased support
from major government agencies such as the
National Endowment for the
Humanities
and the National Science Foundation.
How
is that endorsement making an
impact
across
the campus?
DJM:
The campaign has been very success-
ful
in
raising the profile of Marist College.
Because of that, we have been able to reach
out to federal and state agencies to receive
more funding. We have received several
6
MARIST
MAGAZINE












major grants from the National Science
Foundation. These are the most competi-
tive grants that are given out in computer
science and natural sciences, and we are
competing with the top-tier
institutions in
America when we receive those grants.
The
National Endowment for the Humanities
has
supported our Hudson
River
Valley Institute
with a
major
challenge grant, recognizing
that
we are doing one of the best jobs
in
the
country in
preserving
regional history and
that
this
is one of the important areas
in
America where history should be captured
and passed on to future generations. With
this
challenge grant, we have been able to
raise
another
$2
million to help endow that
program
to assure
that
it will go on in the
future.
Then there
has been
very good state
support. We
have
been very fortunate to
have State Senator Steve Saland, who really
believes in
this
College and understands the
importance
of
private
higher education in a
state
like
New York. So support
for economic development ini-
tiatives
has been
very important.
We have had cooperative projects
on the
development
of our riv-
erfront, which has turned
into
one of the jewels of the campus.
And we have had a collaborative
project with the state to
build
the
underpass under Route 9
connecting our east and west
campuses,
which has made
things safer for our students,
made
the traffic
flow
better
for
the community, and improved
the aesthetics of our entire Route 9 corri-
dor.
These projects
have been
made possible
because of government leaders recognizing
the important
role
that
Marist plays both
in
the
economy of the
region
and the state but
also,
perhaps
more important,
in
educating
future leaders.
MM:
Parents
of current and past students
have played a major
role in
the success of the
campaign. Why is this significant?
DJM:
That
has
been one of the more gratify-
ing parts of the campaign, because
parents
really
do
give
twice.
They are
not
only sup-
porting their sons' and daughters' education
here at Marist, but when they
believe
enough
in what we are doing that they also make
'
generous gifts to
help
advance
the
mission of
the institution, that
is
a real statement about
,





























AQ&Awith
President
Dennis
J.
Murray
\.'
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f-
2
-
C
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L
z
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C
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V
8
continued
the College and the impact
that
we are having
on students and their families. These parents
not only
help
us with giving, they help
us
with outreach
into their
communities. They
help
spread the name of Marist College and
the
good work that goes on here.
MM:
Can you talk more about endowed
scholarships and the impact they have?
DJM:
One of
the
things that
I
support
the
most
in this capital campaign and
have
urged
people
to consider
is
endowed schol-
arships. I see over and over really
talented
students, sometimes at the top of their
classes-captains
of teams, leaders in clubs
and organizations, student body
presidents,
valedictorians, salutatorians-who
express
an
interest
in Marist College
but
because
of family means are unable to do that.
Sometimes the support
that
comes from
endowed scholarships
is
the margin that
allows these best and brightest students to
have the option of choosing Marist College.
So to
me
that is a great way for anyone to give.
MM:
Can you
discuss the
significance of
investments in faculty through professor-
ships, chairs, and research initiatives?
DJM:
The
heart
of any good college or
university is its
faculty, and we have
been
fortunate at Marist to have a dedicated group
of men and women who have
devoted
their
lives to
education. We want to find ways
to
help
support them, to attract
the best
faculty to Marist, and to keep the best
faculty
here.
One of the ways to do that is
through chairs, enhanced faculty funds that
can
provide
additional support to a faculty
member,
and research funds that can allow
faculty to
undertake research, oftentimes
with
their
students, which creates a great
learning
experience.
MM:
Aligned with that theme is
the
notion of
centers of excellence that bring great recogni-
tion
to the
institution.
Can you elaborate on
the
way the campaign
has
helped to bolster
those
important initiatives?
DJM:
First of all, our new Investment Center
in the
Hancock
Center has
been
a great
enhancement to our School of Management.
For students who are
interested
in
business
or finance,
this
is as fine a facility as they
will find at any business school in the coun-
try. Our
Hudson River
Valley Institute
is
a
great program.
It
captures regional
history
and gives students, particularly those in the
MARIST
MAGAZINE

Pedestrian
walkway
under
Route
9
New main gate
McCann
Arena
renovation
Tenney
Stadium
at Leonidoff
Field
















A Campus
Transformed
P
roviding the best resources and facilities for student
is an ongoing priority at Marist. The Campaign
fo
Marist has focused support on the most pressing need
in this area. The generosity of trustees, alumni, parent
faculty, staff, and friends of the College, along with state an
federal grants, has made possible the remarkable change
that have taken place on the campus since The Campaig
for Marist began.
Capital projects completed during the campaign perio
have
included
construction of a signature academic buildi
and athletic and recreational facilities, a major renovatio
of the chemistry labs, and reconfiguration of the campu
through
the
construction of a walkway beneath Route
9
Before the campaign ends on Dec.
31, 2012,
ground will b
broken on a
building
for Marist's Music Department, an
renovation
will begin on the dining hall and other key area
of the Student Center.
Historic
Cornell
Boathouse
Hancock
Center
For more information about the impact
of The Campaign for Marist, visit
www.marist.edu/capitalcampaign.
Dr.
J.
Richard
La
Pietra
'54
Chemistry
Laboratories
PRl"IC,
2012
9


































AQ&Awith
President
Dennis). Murray
\.'
z
1-
z
-
C
I...
['
z
<r:
z
0
C.
I.I"
V
10
continued
field
of history, an opportunity to work
with and help advance
the initiatives
of
that particular
program.
Of course our
partnership with the FDR Presidential
Library
has been enhanced.
The
cam-
paign
provides funds
so that we can
continue
to
digitize the great collection
of work that is
in
the presidential
library
in
Hyde
Park and make
it
available
to
people around the world
through
the
computer systems, storage, and net-
works at Marist.
But perhaps our premier center of
excellence has been the Marist Institute for
Public Opinion. As many people know, it
is
a polling and research organization that
is
part of our School of Liberal Arts, run
by
Lee Miringoff and Barbara Carvalho,
two first-rate professors. The students who
participate are from the fields of political
science,
history,
communications, virtually
every discipline at Marist, and they learn
about
high-quality
scientific research and
analytics. The campaign gave us the ability
to
develop
a
news
center for the institute in
the Hancock Center with the most advanced
computer and polling equipment, and also
a television studio so
that
when they release
the
results
of their
polls,
they can go on the
air to share their good work and
the
results
of their research.
Virtually every one of these
programs
adds an element of prestige and panache to
our College. But most
important,
all of them
involve
students. Students help run these
programs, and participation
in
these kinds of
programs
greatly enriches their educational
experience.
MM:
Why
has
the campaign been successful?
DJM:
I
think
there have been two
success
stories as
part
of this campaign.
First
has
been
the broad-based
nature
of giving, with
over 13,000 gifts
that
have been contributed.
Each and every gift
plays
an
important
role
in
the success of any campaign. But certainly
in
any campaign,
the
major gifts lay a critical
foundation for success. We have been very
fortunate to have our
loyal
donors step up
and make transformative gifts. We
have to
give a
lot
of credit to our Board of Trustees,
to Tim Brier, the campaign chairman; Rob
Dyson,
who served as chair throughout most
of
the
campaign; and Ellen
Hancock,
who
has now
emerged as our new chair and has
continued
those
efforts. These individuals, in
addition to many of our other board mem-
bers, in their
own way
have
made significant
contributions.
MARIST
MAGAZINE

The
Marist
Fund
M
arist's annual giving program, the Marist Fund, is a powerful means of
reaffirming
and sustaining the College's
mission to prepare graduates
for
enlightened, ethical,
and productive lives in the global community of the 21st century. The
Marist
Fund has
played an integral role in the success of The Campaign for Marist and provides long-
time and new donors alike with an important vehicle to contribute vital unrestricted
operating support to
be directed where
resources
are needed most. Marist Fund gifts
are
invested immediately to support the people, programs, and opportunities that
make
the
collegiate experience at Marist so rich. Whether it is critical funding for scholarships,
new resources for the library, or state-of-the-art equipment to enhance computer and
science laboratories, Marist Fund contributions make a meaningful
difference across
the campus community.
The College deeply appreciates the steadfast annual support it receives for the
Marist Fund at all levels. Annual giving participation rates continue to
be
a factor
in
external rankings and are viewed as one important
indicator
of alumni satisfaction.
The College encourages donors to consider a designated gift in
honor
of the campaign
while continuing their vital support for the Marist Fund.
Founding of the Marist
College Legacy Society
S
ome of Marist's best-known leaders are once again leading the way. The Campaign
for Marist is creating new milestones for the College's fund-raising efforts,
and
among them is the founding of the Marist College
Legacy
Society. Its first members
are President Emeritus Dr. Richard Foy '50; President Dennis
J.
Murray and
his
wife,
Marilyn; and Campaign for Marist Chair Tim Brier '69 and his wife, Pat.
The Marist College Legacy Society is a valued circle of individuals who
have remem-
bered Marist in their estate plans and wish to encourage others
to
follow their example.
Those who join during the campaign, which ends Dec. 31, 2012,
will
receive special
recognition. Membership is open to alumni,
trustees,
friends, faculty, staff, college
retirees, parents, and grandparents-all who share a commitment to supporting Marist's
future and its mission to support academic excellence and a culture of community
and service. The College may be provided for in a will or trust; as the
beneficiary
of a
qualified retirement plan, savings bonds, or life insurance policy; or by the creation of
a charitable life-income plan.
For some people, a planned gift enables them
to
support Marist
in
a more generous
way than may have been practical during their lifetime. However, there is no minimum
gift amount required for membership in the Marist College Legacy Society nor is dis-
closure of the gift amount required.
Individuals
may also join and
request
anonymity.
Further information about how to join the Marist College Legacy Society, as well as
useful online tools and information about how to support Marist through one's estate
or as the beneficiary of a
planned
giving arrangement, can be found at www.marist.
edu/plannedgiving.














Teaching
and learning:
Supporting Des rving Students
11119\e
Campaign
for
Marist has so far resulted in
38
ne
ndowed funds and
37
expanded endowed funds. One
I
~f
the new
endowed funds is
the
Abel
Family
Schola hip, established in
2009
through a commitment from
Mr. and Mrs. Robert C.
Abel,
whose daughter, Briana 'o attended Marist.
This academic year,
the
Abel
funding has
supporte scholarships for four Marist students. One of them
is Nicole
Lamorte
'12,
whom you're likely to find in Do elly
112,
the science lab where students explore the
diversity of animals.
Inspired
to
major
in biology from w hing the TV program Wild Discovery
with her father,
Vincent
Lamorte
'83,
she spends three hours a week taki g care of the reptiles in the lab and has happily taken
them-including the
ball python-home
over summer a d winter breaks.
In
fact,
her
pets
at home include her own ball python, Brazilian rainbow boa, two giant day geckos,
a crested
gecko,
a green
tree
frog,
a number of creatures in a
fresh
ter fish tank, and a cat, as well as a friend's chameleon
that she is
babysitting.
•1 love all animals,
but
reptiles ar my favorite,"
she says.
She
likes not
only caring for animals but also conduc ng animal research and may eventually
go to graduate
school
to
study zoology. She was part of a team
that
pre
nted
a poster on its research at the Eastern Colleges
Science Conference at Wagner College in Staten
Island.
s part of
her
genetics course,
rather
than choose one
of
the
offered
projects,
she suggested and carried out as
dy
of the sushi sold in the
Donnelly
Coffee Shop. She
has
also been
a
teaching assistant
for
courses
in
general iology and genetics.
Lamorte's
dream is
to
care for wildlife as
did
Steve I win of Crocodile
Hunter fame, who was dedicated to
the
preservation
of reptiles, or
to
be a reptile
keeper
at
oo. She currently takes care of animals as part of an
internship
at
the Trevor
Zoo at
the
Millbrook School in illbrook, NY. There for five hours a week, she mixes
food for
the
animals, which
include
lemurs,
red
pandas,
a d slow loris, and cleans their living areas. "I have some
playtime
with them,
too:
she smiles. She plans
to
volu eer there when her internship ends. "I love animals.
They
are
really
my
passion:
She says
the
scholarship
has definitely helped
her, a
received it. The
scholarship, she says,
looks
outstanding
one at the New York Aquarium and
two doing
field wo
on
my
future."
she recalls being ecstatic when she learned she had
n her
resume as she applies for internships, including
in Alaska. ·1 hope it will help me to get a good start



























AQ&Awith
President
DennisJ.Murray
I.:
z
~
z
--:i
0
'-
0
z
<
z
0
....I
C
.,..
V
continued
MM:
The campaign has now reached its his-
toric
$150
million goal. With several months
remaining, is there more you would like to
see accomplished?
DJM:
Well, many campaigns do not reach
their goals, so the mere fact that we have not
only met but surpassed our goal is really a
tribute to all the stakeholders here at Marist,
and all of them should feel good about that,
particularly those who
helped lead
this effort.
We have
to
express our gratitude to them,
and we hope they also feel very positive about
what they have
done
for Marist College. But
Marist is the kind of institution that never
rests on its laurels. So reaching this goal with
several months to go
in
the campaign gives us
the opportunity to make sure that everyone
who has been involved with and cares about
Marist College has
had
an opportunity to
make a contribution to this historic cam-
paign. The theme we are using in the final
months of this campaign is,
"If
you have not
participated in this campaign, do not miss
this
opportunity, because it
is
a transforma-
tive time in
the history of Marist."
MM:
What are the remaining priorities?
DJM:
I do not
think our priorities have
changed.
Endowed scholarships to create
accessibility for students are still very high on
my
list.
Support for our faculty and academic
programming
in terms of chairs or addi-
tional support for programming within the
academic areas
is
something I think should
be emphasized. And with Marist, we are
always trying to improve our physical plant
and our facilities. We have got some great
plans coming down the road here
in
terms
of adding a new academic building for music
that will have classrooms and great practice
and rehearsal facilities to give our first-rate
band, orchestra, and choirs the space they
deserve. As part of that, we are going to do a
major
renovation of our Student Center with
an emphasis on the student dining facilities.
We are going to turn those into some of the
very best facilities of any college or
university.
So for people who are looking for naming
opportunities, who feel they benefited from
those
kinds of programs, or who understand
the
importance of a great Student Center
in
a college or university,
I
think there are some
new capital opportunities available
there.
We
hope
we can count on everyone
to
help us go beyond the
$150
million goal and
make
this
campaign as successful as humanly
possible for the sake of this very fine institu-
tion we are all part
of.

The Campaign
for Marist
ClpltalProjlcts
$44,292,392
Gift Designations
Sources
of Support















A Professorshi in Hudson
River Valley H · story
D
r.
James M. Johnson has been appointed the rst Dr. Frank
T.
Bumpus
Professor of Hudson River Valley History,
osition in the School of
Liberal Arts created to advance study and scholar
ip related to the Hudson
River Valley's rich history and culture. The profes rship honors a longtime
resident of the region whose passion for American istory and philanthropic
leadership of the Hudson River Valley Institute
(H
VI) have enabled Marist
to develop one of the country's premier regionals
dies centers.
A nationally and internationally recognize
expert on the War for
Independence in the Hudson River Valley, Johnson s a United States Military
Academy graduate with MA and PhD degrees in istory from Duke and a
master's from the Naval War College. A retired colo el with
30
years of service
in the United States Army, including active duty i Germany and Korea and
at the Pentagon, he taught on the West Point fac ty for
15
years and led its
military history program.
Johnson has taught at Marist since
2000
and
-founded HRVI in
2002,
acting as executive director ever since. He is t e long-serving Military
Historian of the Hudson River Valley National
ritage Area, with responsibilities to develop the
American Revolutionary interpretive theme. Joh1 on has earned numerous honors, including one
from the government of France, for leadership r !es in projects and organizations related to the
preservation and promotion of American history
the Hudson River Valley.
The Bumpus Professor teaches undergradua
courses, delivers public lectures under HRVl's
auspices, and directs and produces scholarship
topics about the Hudson River Valley for dis-
semination through HRVl's Digital Library, its s olarly journal
The Hudson River Valley Review,
and published articles and monographs. The pro£ sor also serves as the liaison to the Hudson River
Valley National Heritage Area for which HRVI i the academic arm. HRVI is also supported by a
National Endowment for the Humanities Challen e Grant to promote excellence in the humanities
and convey the lessons of history through public rograms.
SPRING
2012
13
























!i:a1~:--:-=-
➔-=--=--
--
- -
r---
-
l
1.l
I
~
l
Next for Marist:
A New Academic Building
and a Complete Student
Center Renovation
The music building is
part of a
$27
million
project that includes
a major renovation of
Marist's dining hall, the
Nelly Goletti Theatre,
student activities space,
and public areas of the
Student Center.
This
summer, the College will break ground on a 23,000-square-
l
foot building to house Marist's robust Music Department and
the 18 vocal and instrumental ensembles active on campus. The
facility will also provide smaller-venue, multipurpose arts space.
Marist has more than 400 student musicians and as many as 600
students enrolled in music courses each semester. Music is not a
major at Marist, but minors are offered in instrumental and vocal
tracks.
The new building is part of a $27 million project that includes a
major renovation of Marist's dining hall, the Nelly Galetti Theatre,
student activities space, and public areas of the Student Center that
are part of what was the College's original Campus Center.
The dining hall in particular will change dramatically. Plans
call for a spectacular atrium, student lounges, and an area for quiet
dining and studying. Capacity will increase by 200 seats over current
facilities. An outdoor terrace will be created over a current loading
dock, taking advantage of Hudson River views. Robert A. M. Stern
Architects, whose founder is dean of the Yale School of Architecture,
designed Marist's Hancock Center and is leading the latest projects.
The new music building is a dream come true for Arthur
Himmelberger, director of the Music Program, and those affiliated
with Marist who love music, including current students and several
thousand alumni musicians. All are part of what Himmelberger
calls "a family" who love music and challenge themselves to achieve
higher levels of musical excellence.
"Our music program provides and emphasizes worthwhile music
activities and academic offerings for students who don't wish to
make a living at music," says Himmelberger. "These nurtured skills
14
MARIST
MAGALINE
contribute to the musical vitality of
the College and remain with students,
to be used and enjoyed throughout
their lives."
Leading the vision for music at
Marist is Dr. Dennis
J.
Murray. "When he became president in 1979,
there was no band or choir," says Himmelberger. "Dr. Murray has
been very, very helpful and instrumental in our development. He
has been our greatest advocate."
"We outgrew our current
facilities several years ago,"
Himmelberger says. "But the desire of our student musicians to
succeed, excel in their crafts, and provide audiences with quality
performances has superseded the facility obstacles they have faced
preparing their concert literature." The building will feature major
rehearsal spaces for various bands, choirs, and orchestras. It will also
offer eight practice rooms, three classrooms, music faculty offices,
a piano lab, a computer lab, music library space, and storage for
instruments and large equipment.
Adjoining the east side of the College's original Campus Center,
the three-level building will architecturally transform that part of
campus with a Hudson Valley modern gothic style in red brick and
grey stone.
The Music Department has grown significantly over the past few
years and in addition to supporting the ensembles offers students
from all majors classes in jazz, opera, music theory, piano instruction,
voice instruction, medieval and renaissance music, the history of
motion picture music, and music of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries,
among other subjects.


















Marist musical ensembles perform throughout the
on and off campus, in the surrounding community, acros
try, and around the globe.
In
April
1999
the Marist Sing
the canonization of Saint Marcellin Champagnat in Ro
musical
ensembles have also performed in Canada, Mas
Hawaii,
Florida, New
Jersey,
Arizona, California, Washi
and
Puerto
Rico.
hool year
hecoun-
s
sang at
e. Marist
chusetts,
ton.DC,
The more than
200-member
Marist Singers group, wi its seven
ensembles,
has
roots in the College's earliest days. Thro hout the
years, student Brothers were involved in the preparation
o
chants and harmony vocalizing several times a week,
Masses and campus
concerts.
Special
choirs
sang the mo
pieces and also performed in the community. The choral t
revived
and expanded with the arrival of President Mur
Marist's band was formed
in 1986
by Himmelberger,
United States Army percussionist
and
member of the se
ship team of the United States Military Academy Band at
In 2001,
he retired
from the Army and joined Marist
~
director
of the Music
Department.
regorian
nging at
difficult
tionwas
in
1979.
owasa
rleader-
t
Point.
time as
The
130-member
symphonic
band performs in con ert halls,
befitting
its
primary mission
to
master
symphonic
band pertoire
that provides higher
levels
of technical and aesthetic di culty so
student
members can grow as musicians and perform claimed
concert
literature.
These same musicians perform at foot II games
as the Marist Marching Band. Additionally, these sam tudents,
separated
into two squads, perform as the Marist
sketball
Pep Band.
The Marist String Orchestra was formed in 1997 and ontinues
to
grow. Currently, it has
35
members who
play
string and rchestral
literature
from
the
classical, romantic, and 20th-cent ry music
periods. The orchestra, along with the
symphonic
band
d choral
group,
annually fills the 933-seat
historic Bardavon
1869
0
ra
House
in downtown Poughkeepsie for two
spring
concerts.
The new music building is expected to open
in
fall 20
line
of dedicated student musicians eager for a new horn
forming. Renovations to the Student Center will also be
in fall 2013.
,and the
salready
mpleted
Remaining
Opportunities
Scholarship Endowment
Education opens doors and enables
people to realize their dreams-of personal fulfillment, of the
career they want, of being able to support a family. Learning
should not be only for those with resources, and Marist strives
to provide as much support as possible to academically
qualified
students of need. Gifts to scholarship endowments continue
to be critically
important
and deeply appreciated by student
recipients.
Research
At Marist, students can collaborate with faculty
and student colleagues on research projects across a variety of
disciplines.
Support for student research will make an
impact
on
many
levels.
These opportunities enable students
to
experience
the wonder of discovery,
to enrich their knowledge,
to contribute
to their area of study, and to stand out among the competition
when applying for graduate school or a job.
Centers of Excellence
The College is widely noted for the
Marist Institute for Public Opinion, the highly respected survey
organization now in its 34th year, and the Hudson River Valley
Institute, which is dedicated to promoting awareness of the rich
history and culture of the Hudson River Valley. More recently,
new centers are earning recognition. In 2009, the Raymond A.
Rich Institute for Leadership Development was established. In
2011, Marist
launched
the Center for Sports Communication,
and the Student
Investment
Center opened its doors. Each offers
unique learning opportunities through an exciting synergy
of students, faculty, and professionals. Benefactors can play a
huge role in the creation of new centers dedicated to an area of
interest they share with the College.
Community Service and Civic Engagement
It comes as no
surprise to anyone associated with Marist that community
service is a high priority among not only students but faculty
and staff. Whether carried out in the form of volunteer work
during free time or as part of course work, such pursuits have
been a fundamental part of education here since the days of the
founding Marist Brothers. Support for these activities will help
the College fulfill
its
mission of developing the whole person in
a way that will prepare graduates for an enlightened, sensitive,
and
productive
life in the global community of the 21st century.
Campus Improvements
Known for
its
location on the Hudson
River and its beautiful campus, Marist is constantly improving
its physical plant. Premier facilities are crucial in providing
students with a first-rate collegiate experience as well as in
attracting students. With support from alumni, parents, faculty,
staff, and friends, Marist strives to meet the ongoing challenge
of containing costs while offering students the best in both
academic and recreational resources. Immediate projects are
construction of a music building and renovations to the dining
hall and other key areas of the Student
Center.

SPRING
2012
1S

























MAAC regular season championship for the
ninth straight year. Along the way, Marist's
streak of consecutive
victories against confer-
ence opponents, which began in 2010, went
as high as 34. The contributions of some key
holdovers, coupled with the emergence of
several players, fueled another champion-
ship run.
Yarde swept the conference's major

awards as she was named MAAC Preseason
~
Player of the Year, MAAC
Player
of the Year,
and MAAC Tournament Most Valuable
Player. The multitalented Yarde, who scored
The Red
Foxes
set a Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Tourn:!ment record for
fewest
points
allowed in a championship game, while
Brian
Giorgis won his 250th game in
10
years as head coach.
'
her 1,oooth career point in the season opener
against Villanova on Nov.
16, led
the team
in points, rebounds, assists, blocks, and
steals. Gang earned all-conference honors
for the second straight year as she was named
Second Team All-MAAC, and she was also
named to the MAAC All-Tournament
Team.
Athletics
Marist
Women's
Basketball
Wins
MAAC
ChamJtionship
for Seventh
Strai!1ht
Vear
Sophomore guard Leanne Ockenden, a
key reserve on last year's team, moved into
the starting lineup and earned a reputation
as a lockdown defender and reliable long-
distance shooter. Her play was rewarded
with a Third Team All-MAAC selection.
Sophomore Casey Dulin stepped into the
starting
point
guard position following
Best's
injury
and turned in a fine all-around sea-
son which saw her rank third on the team
in
points, third in rebounds, and second in
assists as she was named to the MAAC All-
Tournament Team. Junior forward Kelsey
Beynnon, another first-year starter this sea-
son, had several spectacular performances
down the stretch. Beynnon totaled 23 points
and 16 rebounds
in
the semifinal victory over
Niagara.
I
T CERTAINLY
LOOKED
BLEAK AT THE
TIME.
With the Marist women's basketball
team trailing
by
13 points with 12
minutes
left in this year's Metro Atlantic Athletic
Conference (MAAC) semifinal round, was
the team's run of tournament championships
about to come to an end?
The Red Foxes answered with an
emphatic "no" as they outscored Niagara
41-14 over the remainder of regulation and
the ensuing overtime period to reach the
championship game. When he walked into
the postgame press conference, head coach
Brian Giorgis summarized the game in as
understated a tone as could be.
"Just another day at the office," he said
with a smile.
And the best was truly yet to come. Two
days later, Marist won its seventh consecutive
MAAC championship and eighth overall by
defeating Fairfield 61-35.
The Red Foxes set a
tournament record for fewest points allowed
in a championship game, while Giorgis won
his 250th game in 10 years as head coach.
The Red Foxes received the 13th seed in
the Raleigh Regional
and drew fourth-seeded
Georgia in their first-round matchup. Led by
BY MIKE
FERRARO
'01
Mike
Ferraro
'01
is
sports
information
director at Marist College.
16
MARIST
MAGAZINE
21 points from senior guard Corielle Yarde
and 18 fr.om senior forward Brandy Gang,
Marist earned a 76-70 triumph. The win was
the
team's fifth in the NCAA Tournament in
program history, as Marist won a first-round
game for the fourth time in six years.
In the second round, Mari st fell just short
against Sit. Bonaventure, 66-63. But the loss
did not diminish a remarkable journey for
the Red Foxes, who had to overcome a con-
siderable amount of adversity just to become
MAAC champions again.
The Red Foxes came into the 2011-12
season having
lost
the reigning MAAC
Player of lthe Year (Erica Allenspach
'11),
two
additiona1I
starters (Elise Caron
'11
and Kate
The architect of the program was
rewarded for his efforts as well, as Giorgis
was named MAAC Coach of the Year for
the sixth time. This season, Marist enjoyed
its ninth straight 20-win season and its sixth
straight campaign with at least 25 wins, as
the team finished 26-8.

Oliver), and a key role player (Maria Laterza
Senior guard Corielle Yarde (left) swept
the
'u)
from :a team that had won 31 games and
MAAC's major awards as she was
named
MAAC
had advanced to the second round of the
PreseasonPlayeroftheYear,MAACPlayerof
NCAA ~ournament. Marist was then dealt
the Year, and MAAC
Tournament
Most Valuable
Player. Women's basketball
head
coach
Brian
an unexpected
loss
when senior point guard
Giorgis (right) was named
MAAC
coach of the
Kristine Best suffered a knee injury
in
early
Year for
the
sixth time.
December and was lost for the remainder
,
of
the
season. The period of transition came
while the Red Foxes were facing a daunting
_
nonconference schedule, and they entered
January with a 5-6 record.
Once conference play began, the Red
Foxes quickly matured as a team as they won
5
20 out of 21 games in the MAAC regular
,
season and tournament. The team won the




























Krystian Witkowski
'12
has become the first Red
Fox to sign a professional deal with a Major
League Soccer organization.
Greta Leberfinger
Qualifies for 2012 United
States Olympic Trials
G
RETA LEBERFINGER
'is
has become
the first active Marist student-
athlete in school
history
to qualify for a
United States Olympic trial. Leberfinger
recorded a time of 1:11.88
in
the
100-meter
breaststroke
at the Eastern College
Athletic Conference's
Long
Course
Meter Swimming
Invitational
on Feb.
23 at the United States Naval Academy
in
Annapolis, MD.
In doing
so, she came in
0.31 seconds ahead of
the
trial standard
time.
After nearly making
the cut
in
her
first qualifying attempt in the morning
with a time of 1:12.66, Leberfinger came
back
in
the night
session on a mission.
It
was
there
that she swam to a time of
1:11.88, ahead of
the
Olympic time
trial
standard of 1:12.19. With her
result,
Leberfinger
will now be
invited
to com-
pete for a spot on
the
2012 U.S. Olympic
Swim Team. The trials will be
held June
25
through July 2 in
Omaha,
NE, with only
a chosen few making the cut to represent
the United States at the 2012 Summer
Olympics
in
London.
-Alex Lumb
Krystian Witkowski
,
Signs wi1th Philadelphia
Union of MLS
II
RYSTIAN WITKOWSKI
'12, one of
~arist
men's soccer's all-time
leading scorers, became an official
member of the Philadelphia Union of
Major Leagiue Soccer on Feb. 21 when
the club announced his signing to a pro-
fessional corntract. On
Jan.
17, Witkowski
was selecte,d 26th overall in the 2012
MLS Supplemental Draft.
The Un'ion began their 2012 sea-
son on March 12 against the Portland
Timbers. Their 34-match regular season
runs until Oct. 27.
A three-time
National
Soccer
Coaches Association
of America
All-Region selection and All-Metro
Atlantic Athletic Conference honoree,
Witkowski
iis
the first Red Fox to have
signed a professional deal with an MLS
organization.
-Alex Lumb
Alisa Kresge
'07
and Rik Smits
'88
were honored
at the inaugural MAAC
Honor
Roll Dinner
at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of
Fame on March
2.
Two
former student-athletes
from each of the conference's
10
schools were
enshrined in the MAAC Experience, the league's
exhibit at the Hall of Fame.
Greta Leberfing,er
'1s
has become the first active Mari st student-athlete
in
school history to qualify
for a United States Olympic trial.
SPRING
2012
17







































18
&
n
O
t:
es
Keeping Up with Marist Graduates
Send
Your
News
If you have
news
to share,
let your
fellow
alumni
hear
from
you.
E-mail
maristalumni@marist.edu
Online
www.marist.edu/alumni/alupdate
Mail
Office
of Alumni
Relations
Maris!
College,
3399
North
Rd.
Poughkeepsie,
NY
12601-1387
Phone
(845)
575-3283
MARIST
MAGAZINE
1954:
Laurence
Sullivan's
son, Andrew,
married Lisa
Conners at Our Lady
of Mercy Church in Port Chester,
NY, on Nov. 6, 2010.
~Bnm•im:::
1962,
Patrick Murphy
retired
after 47
years in education and "1putting four
children through college·."
a
M.
John
O'Connell
has "unretired"
to
offer
pro bono
seminars on successful
school-wide and
district-wide
anti·
bullying efforts based on the work
of Dr. Thomas Lickona, founder
and director of
the
Center for
the
Fourth
and
Fifth Rs
(Respect and
Responsibility) in
SUN)( Cortland's
School of Education.
1963,
Francis Sutton
retired from teach•
ing but
is
still running Sutton's
Place, a
mini-bed
and breakfast in
Manchester, VT, welcoming guests
year-round.
~M:Wi·UC:::
1967
Jerome
Bohnert
has
been
retired
for four years.
He
previously served
as a school business administrator
in several New
Jersey
school dis-
tricts and was also president of the
New Jersey Association of School
Business Officials. Jerome and
his
wife,
Dolly, live
in Barnegat Light,
NJ, and have five grandchildren.
They enjoy traveling,
boating,
fish•
ing, and "beaching."
1968:
Richard
Amodeo
became
licensed
in
2010 as an enrolled agent by
the IRS,
which author;izes him to
prepare
tax returns and represent
clients
before
the
m~;.
This
has
become Richard's part-time
retire•
ment
career.
a
Lawrence Carr
has
been elected vice chairman of the
board of trustees at Union Graduate
College
in
Schenectady, NY.
1970
James
Elliott
retired )luly
1,
2011,
after 40 years of teaching deaf
and hearing-impaired children for
Nassau BOCES. James and
his
wife,
Pat, now plan
to "see the world."
1971
Raymon
Charlton's
son, Marques,
has been invited to play for the USA
Basketball team in France
during
the summer of 2012. Marques is a
sophomore at Clarkson University.
m
Frederick
Emken
notes the pass-
ing of his
beloved
mother, Marjorie
V. Em
ken.
She was 93.
"Anthony
Parga
was reelected to a second
14-year term on the New York
State Supreme Court 10th
Judicial
District. Justice Parga had served on
the New York State judiciary for the
past
19
years and is the first Marist
grad to
be
elected to the New York
State Supreme Court.
~M•JN•Uk
~
1972
Dr.
Vincent
Coda
has
been in prac-
tice
for 33 years. After 31 years with
his
own practice, he joined Parkview
Physicians Group and is now an
employee of Parkview
Health,
which serves northeast Indiana and
northwest Ohio. Parkview's group
of physicians
now numbers
more
than
300.
He
says he is having fun
again, working with patients doing
what he was trained to do.
a
James
J.
Mcloughlin
participated
in
the Viva Palestina land convoy to
Gaza which
brought
medical and
humanitarian aid.
1973
Richard
Freccia
is completing
his second year as president of the
Monmouth County, NJ, School
Counselors Association and
is
a
school counselor at Allentown High
School in central New Jersey.
m
Jack
Simeone
was recently appointed to
serve as
the
chief program officer for
Catholic Charities of the Diocese of
Albany, where
he has
worked for 33
years. Jack's older, twin daughters
got married
in
the past year and
his youngest three children are
attending college.
,.
With a five-year
grant from the U.S. Department
of Education's Office of Special
Education
Programs,
Michael
Ward,
PhD,
is
the coordinator and
an instructor for the online mas•
ter's
program
in secondary special
education and
transition
services
at George Washington University.
1976
Linda
(Delaney)
Dickerson
Hartsock
has
been
named director,
economic
development
and com-
munity engagement, at Syracuse
University. Linda was previously a
senior member of
New York
State's
economic development team, work-
ing
for several governors
through
the Empire State Development
Corp. A
Hudson
Valley
native,
she
was formerly president and CEO of
Hudson
Valley Pattern for Progress
and a
longtime
member of the fac•
ulty and administration
at Marist.
Her
husband, Dr. John
Hartsock,
is
also a former Marist faculty
member and
is
now a SUNY
pro·
fessor.
e
Patricia Tillou
is opening
a practice, Xenia Chiropractic. After
21 years of raising kids, Patricia is
coming out of retirement!
-imtMW
~
1977
Dr. Michael A. Nugent
was named
University of Maryland Eastern
Shore 2011 Employee of the Year.
Over the past few years,
he has
generated $1
million
from various
granting sources. The funding
is
paying the tuition for 85
high
school
students from the two poorest coun•
ties
in
Maryland as they take college
classes while
pursuing
high school
diplomas.
1979
Joseph
Walsh
writes that
he
loved
the picture of "Dave Richardson
'78 and all the boys" cheering on
the New York Giants in the winter
2011-2012 edition of
Marist
maga•
zine. He says
it
"brought back great
memories!"
lGaam•uc
~
1982
Roger
V.
Coleman
has been
ranked
No.
1
in New York State on the
Barron's
list
of the top
1,000
finan-
cial advisors for the second consecu•
tive year. The 2012 list
is
based on
assets under management,
revenue
Jpiu;!HZ
The
flag denotes
classes
that
will
celebrate
reunions
in
2012.


















Webinar
by Chris
NlcCann,
President
of 1-800-flowers.c(tm,
Launches
Marist
College
Ent1repreneur
Network
0
n Feb.
7,
more than
160
Marist alumni,
students, parents, faculty, staff, and
friends participated in a webinar hosted by
Marist Trustee Chris McCann '83, president
of 1-800-flowers.com.
The webinar is the
first step toward creating a Marist College
Entrepreneur Network,
which encompasses stu-
dents, alumni, parents,
faculty, staff, and friends.
The initiative was
sparked by none other than Marist stu-
dents. The Marist Student Entrepreneur
Network (MSEN) was organized in
February of
2011
and has grown to
100
members. MSEN offers a variety of pro-
grams for students including guest speak-
ers on campus, webinars, and workshops.
"I
believe that MSEN is responsible
for my recent success," says co-founder
and
marketing
major Danielle Provost
'iz.
"I would like to watch this organization
grow and see other Marist students gain
success
by
utilizing amazing opportunities
that only this organization
has
been able
to provide thus far. There really is no other
thing
like
it on campus."
Three Marist faculty/staff provide support
to the group: Bill Thirsk, chief information
officer, Tony Di Marco, director of strategic
initiatives, and Dr. David Gavin, assistant pro-
fessor in the School of Management. "MSEN
is a mutual win for Marist students and local
entrepreneurs," says Di Marco.
"Marist
stu-
dents glean valuable nuggets of wisdom from
entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs can bounce
ideas off a cross-disciplinary group of really
talented college students-not to mention the
mutual benefit of internships and jobs sourced
through MSEN."
When several members of MSEN gradu-
ated
last
May, they were disappointed that they
could no longer stay involved with the group.
In additiorn, the College was approached
by
an
alumnus entrepreneur who was looking for sup-
port from other alumni entrepreneurs when
starting hi:s company. These were the catalysts
that convinced Marist to extend MSEN into
a more encompassing Marist College
Entrepreneur Network.
MSEN and the Alumni Office collabo-
rated
to offer a free webinar to commence
the network. "We realize there are many
successful alumni entrepreneurs, but we
knew Chris [McCann] would be the perfect
presenter to kick off this network,"
says Amy
Woods
'97,
executive director of alumni
relations. "Chris's story is truly inspiring
and
he has
a wealth of helpful advice for
other entrepreneurs."
Following
the
webinar, a Marist
College Entrepreneur "group" was created
on Linkedin.com. Within five days, more
than
120
members joined.
The
forum offers
members an opportunity to network, post
discussions, post jobs, and more.
"The network can only grow," says Amy
Woods. "In today's highly competitive and
challenging marketplace, more and more
people
are being creative with their career
paths.
With more than
34,000
Marist
alumni worldwide, thousands of parents,
and many local businesses, it's only natut'al
that we rely on each other to succeed. And
Marist can offer various resources to entrepre-
neurs, such as incubator support, TelePresence
services, and student interns. We also hope this
initiative shows our students that they're not
alone. There
is
a network of support waiting
for them when they graduate."
To listen to a recording of the Chris
McCann webinar, visit www.marist.edu/
alumni/specialevents.html.
To join the network,
search Marist College Entrepreneur Network
on Linkedln.com.
Former Mari st basketball players
returned to campus in February for
Men's Basketball Alumni Day. After
touring the renovated basketball
arena and new team facilities, they,
along with their families, cheered
the Red Foxes on to an 89·77 win over
Niagara from the new basketball
suite in the McCann Center. Alumni
included
(back
row, left to right)
Ben Farmer
'08,
Kaylen Gregory
'08,
Ray Manning
'71,
Ron Alexander
'76,
Tim Murphy
'87, (front
row, left to
right) Jim Cosentino
'72,
and James
Wright
'66.
Also in attendance but
not pictured were Korey Bauer
'11,
Joe
Cirasella
'7s,
and Allen Fairhurst
'75.
SPRING
2012
19

































&notes
Roger V. Coleman
'82
the advisors generate for their firms,
and the quality of their practices.
Roger also has been ranked No. 5 on
the
Barron's
top
100
financial advi-
sors list. He is a financial advisor at
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney in
Garden City, NY.
1986
Kim
(Ahders)
Goodson's
daughter,
Paige, participated last summer in
the Marist pre-college summer
program for sports communica-
tion.
m
Ian
O'Connor
recently
was named one of America's top 10
sports columnists by the prestigious
Associated Press Sports Editors
organization in its annual national
writing contest. He is currently a
columnist for ESPN, a radio host
for ESPN New York, and author of
two
New York Times
best sellers,
including
The Captain: The Journey
of Derek Jeter.
~BUUNJR
~
1987
Ann Coleen
Hellerman
lives
in Connecticut and is pursuing a
master's in library science. She
is
married and has two children.
1988
Allison
(Hughes)
Stanton
com-
pleted the Defense
Intelligence
Agency Joint Military Attache
School Spouse Training Program
and received her certificate as a
Distinguished Graduate. Allison
has volunteered and will serve in
attache duty in Accra, Ghana, with
her husband, LTC Dwayne Stanton,
the U.S. Military Attache Designate
to Ghana. Their sons, DJ and Reilly,
will accompany them.
20
MARIST
MAGAZINE
1989
Cynthia
Lemek
has been employed
since November 2010 by Association
Acumen, an association manage-
ment company. She is the execu-
tive director for two of A:ssociation
Acumen's clients: the Society of
American Travel Writers and the
Ophthalmic Anesthesia :Society.
1991
Jennifer Puetzer
was recently
promoted to senior vice president
of finance for Tommy Hilfiger Retail
North America.
lnauw•n•
=:
1992
James
Alecca
is an entrepreneurial
vexillologist, one who studies flags.
He is also a film produce1r/distribu-
tor and a
lawn
care entrepreneur.
"Joseph
Proto
has been residing
in
Florida since 2002. He owns
two wire management companies,
Electiduct,
Inc.,
and EZ Hidewire,
Inc.
1993
Pedro Figueroa
recently joined
the American Sugar Refining Co.
(ASR, aka Domino Sugar & Florida
Crystals Corp.) and is based in the
company's global headquarters in
West Palm Beach, FL. Pedro pre-
viously spent 12 years with global
commodity merchant ED&F Man
in a variety of executive manage-
ment roles throughout the Americas
(San Juan, Puerto Rico, Miami,
Mexico City, and Mexico). As vice
president for the International
Division at ASR, his responsibili-
ties include the further integration
and further development of the
group's global export business to
key regional markets throughout
the world.
a
Andrea
Preziotti
was promoted to communications
director, managing sales communi-
cations, for AOL, where she's been
working for the past five years. In
2011 Andrea learned how to surf
in
Nicaragua; spent time discov-
ering the Southeast with trips to
Louisiana, the Carolinas, Georgia,
West Virginia, and Tennessee; and
was a featured model for Shameless
Photography Studios 1940s Glamour
Pin-up Collection. An avid concert-
goer, Andrea has also enjoyed the
reunion tours of fave bands Duran
Duran, OMO, and Psychedelic Furs.
She spends the remainder of her free
time mastering karaoke.
1994
Jeffrey Schanz
('99MPA) and his
wife, Sarah, welcomed a daughter,
Lily Frances, born Jan. 26, 2012.
m
Kevin Stranahan
oversees site
safety operations and is a lead
trainer
in
several personal safety
Clockwise from right: Alvin Patrick
'86,
senior
producer for
The Daily,
speaks
with Mari
st
communication
majors Brenna Goetht!l
'16,
Ryan Rivard
'12,
Garrin Marchetti
'14,
and Jennifer Abbey
'12
during
Student-
Alumni Networking Night in New York City.
Alumni Meet 111tith
Communication Students in New York City
M
ore than
45
c0tmmunication and media arts
addition to Patrick, Joey-Lyn Addesa '06, James
students and a1lumni gathered Feb. 6 in New
Baumann '90, Amanda Cornwell '08, Alison
York City for the second annual Student-Alumni
Duffy
'10,
David Hochman '08, Dory Larrabee
Networking Night, sponsored by the School of
'07, John Liporace '88, Tim McGeever '09, Maria
Communication & the Arts.
Gordon Shydlo '87, and Alexandra Wickman '07.
"The kids were
,engaging,
smart and ambi-
Students described the networking event as a "great
tious-exactly
what it takes to make it in the new
experience" and called
it
"an opportunity to meet
media world," says Alvin Patrick '86, senior pro-
people and practice networking in a comfortable
ducer for
The Daily.
environment."
The networking session was held at the 92nd
The event was organized
by Marist's
St. Yin upper Manhattan. More than 35 students
Communication Internship Program and supported
took part, meeting with
11
alumni who work
by the Dr. Mary Louise Bopp Communication
in television, public relations, advertising, and
Endowment.
journalism. The alumni guest speakers were,
in






























Crew Anniversaries Celebrated
F
ormer and current Marist crew captains
and coaches gathered on Jan. 20 at Marist's
historic Cornell
Boathouse
to
honor
four special
milestones:
the 50th anniversary of men's crew,
the 31st anniversary of women's crew,
the
25th
anniversary of the Mari st crew poster, and the
10th anniversary of
Marist's participation in
the
Henley Royal Regatta.
Sean Kaylor '90, a former crew captain
and Marist's vice president for enrollment
management, shared
his
memories
while stressing how
important
crew
has
been
to
Marist's
history as well as
the integral role it plays for students
today. Marist's third
men's
crew coach,
Bill Austin, was
honored
during the
presentation for his contributions
to
the
program.
Additional events and celebrations
will be planned throughout 2012 to
commemorate
these
milestones. If
you would like to
make
a tax-deductible
contribution
to
Marist crew, or would
like
to support
the
program in other
ways, please contact Chris DelGiorno
'88, vice president for college advance-
ment, at maristalumni@marist.edu or
(845) 575-3264.
and
protection
programs as the
security manager of St. Vincent's
Medical Center
in
Bridgeport, CT.
Kevin and
his
wife, Diana, wel-
comed
their
first child, a son,
Jax
Joseph, born
June 7, 2011.
1995
Gregory Petruska
was recently
promoted to
director,
EHS, for NBC
Universal's Live Theatre projects
worldwide.
1996
Gregory
Donohue
and
his
wife,
Kristen,
welcomed their third son,
Peter
James, in
May of 2011.
~BWJN&
~
1997
Gina
D'Angelo-Mullen
has
been
promoted to
director
of advertis-
ing for Health
Quest,
a group of
hospitals and affiliated health care
providers in
the Hudson
Valley.
Gina and her husband,
Robert,
welcomed a second daughter,
Layla
Marie,
born
December 2010. Layla
joins big sister Ava Noelle, 5, at
home.
e
Regina
(Casey)
Heaton
and
her husband,
Christopher,
welcomed their
first
child, Abigail
Anne,
born
Oct. 11, 2011.
e
Michael
and
Carolyn (Mercury) Lockward
welcomed a
baby
girl, Morgan
Hope,
born Sept.
16,
2011. Morgan joins
big sister
Lauren
Grace at
home.
e
Eric
Mandeville
wai; a finalist
for Colorado Assistant
Principal
of the Year for 2011.
a
Frank
and
Janice
(Kelly)
McCreay
welcomed
twin boys, Sean James and John
Brendan, born Aug. 30, 2011. The
twins join big sister Kat,e at
home.
a
Carie (Piskura)
Per1ugini
and
her husband, Rocco, welcomed
their first child, a son, Clhristopher
Jayden,
born Sept. 20, 2011.
a
Nicole
Schlott
married Thom,1s Sullivan
on Dec. 3, 2011. Marist classmates
Christine
(Datig)
Duffy
and
Vanessa
(Cesare) Sullens
were
in
the bridal party.
1998
Michael Benevento
began working
for HBO as a senior on-air
planner
in the program planning depart-
ment
for
HBO
and Cinemax in
March 2011.
a
Sean
Connell
and
his wife, Tricia, welcomed their first
child, Aidan Shane, born Aug. 21,
ltJl~liHZ:::
The flag
denotes
classes
that will celebrate
reunions in
2012.
2011.
a
Judith Davis
married
Jason
Bullis on Oct. 8, 2011, at
Leptondale
Bible Church in
Newburgh,
NY.
Their
reception
was at Pamela's on
the
Hudson.
The couple
has known
each other for 17 years.
e
Stephanie
(Mercurio)
Doran
and her hus-
band, Peter, welcomed their first
daughter,
Harper
Marjorie,
born
June 8, 2011.
"Jeffrey
Muller
was
promoted to partner at
law
firm
McCarter
&
English, LLP. Jeffrey is
an attorney in the tax and
benefits
practice, where he represents clients
in connection with various trans-
actional
tax
and
business
planning
matters
involving corporations, S
corporations, partnerships, and
lim-
ited
liability companies,
including
taxable and tax-free mergers and
acquisitions.
1999
James
and
Heather
(Woods)
Guzman
welcomed their second
son, Jack Charles,
born June
30,
2ou.
e
Jim
Kutter
and
his
wife,
Guests included Jeanne
(Ball)
Fox
'83,
Joe Fox
'82,
Jim Foley
'82,
Jack
Boyle
'78,
and Maureen
(Doolan)
Boyle's,.
Sean Kaylor
'90
(left), former crew
captain and vice president for
enrollment management at Marist,
and Tom Sanford
(center),
director
of Mari
st
rowing and women's
crew
head coach, presented a framed
Mari st
crew
poster to Bill Austin,
former Mari
st crew
coach, for his
contributions to Marist
crew.
Aisha
(Wright) 'oo, received
the
Hudson
Valley Gateway Chamber
of Commerce Chairman's Award
for 2012.
Jim
and Aisha also cel-
ebrated the birth of
their third
child, Josephine
Kutter, born
Oct.
13, 2010.
a
Jennifer
Murray
wel-
comed identical twin girls, Emma
Ryleigh and Harleigh Grace, born
Aug. 23, 2011.
The
girls were born
two months early but are doing very
well.
e
Christine (Lubas)
Ryba
and
her husband,
Andrew, welcomed a
second son, Timothy William,
born
Jan. 17, 2011.
e
John
Svare
married
Heather Dippert on Sept. 4, 2011.
2000
Gregory Dicembri
has been
serving in the U.S. Air Force
since Sept. 10, 2001, and
has been
deployed four times including two
tours
in
Iraq and two in southwest
Asia. He also
has been
in the New
York City Fire Department since
2007.
e
David Gianna
('02MS)
is
teaching
graduate cybersecurity at
University of Maryland University
College.
David
is also a board
member of the Poughkeepsie Pilots
Association, assumed a leadership
role in the NY/NJ
metro
chapter of
Open Web Application Security
Project,
and has accepted the
posi-
tion of senior security consultant
at Arsenal Security Group of
SPRING
2012
21









































McLean, VA, focusing on secu-
rity
consulting for transit/rail
agencies
.
.,
Patrick Kelly
and
his wife,
Monica,
welcomed a
third child, Brigid Elisabeth,
in
November 2011.
He
continues
to
work as a senior
policy
advisor
with the American Petroleum
Institute in Washington, DC.
e
Aisha
(Wright)
Kutter
and
her husband,
Jim
'99,
received
the
Hudson
Valley Gateway
Chamber of Commerce Chairman's
Award for 2012. Aisha and Jim also
celebrated the birth of their third
child, Josephine Kutter, born Oct.
13,
2010
.
.,
Donald Urmston
(MBA)
was appointed as a
full-time
tenured
professor of business management
at SUNY Orange in August 2011.
e
Diana
(Gennaro)
Walsh
and her
husband,
Philip
'01,
welcomed
their second child, Brady Joseph,
born Dec. 22, 2011. Their daugh-
ter, Savannah Mae,
loves
being a
,.
big sister!
Ron
B.u11nlud1
a
Alumni Authors
T
he book
The Last Walk on Our Block
by
Ron
Baumbach
'71
offers personal reflections as three
brothers
and a sister return
to
their family home after
their elderly mother's sudden passing. They find them-
selves once again walking their former
block,
reconnect-
ing
with
their
childhood years and
life
in the
1950s
and
'6os. The 342-page book
is
available
in
print and e-book
formats on amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.
A new book
in
the
Amoveo Legend
series by
Sara
Humphreys
'92
was
scheduled for release by Sourcebooks in spring 2012.
Untouched will be followed by three more books in the
series. The first
installment,
Unleashed, was a "fresh,
exciting take on shape-shifters, which is one of the
hottest areas of paranormal
romance"
(www.sarahum-
phreys.com).
It
won
Best
Book of 2011 in the Grave Tells
Reader's Choice Awards.
Dead in the City, Sara's urban
fantasy vampire series, was recently sold to Sourcebooks
in a five-book
deal,
with the first book
slated for
release
in 2013.
D.M.
Roberts
'oo
self-published her
first novel,
Letting
1
Go & Holding On, in February 2011. The book explores
social issues connected with youth violence. It
is
available
2001
J..
,;_
as an e-book on smashwords.com and amazon.com, and
Robert
Adamski
and Lisa
Suski became engaged on Sept.
··•:·-
I
·i
;r::::~c:l~
::::::~~:::::::~::~~:~kill
Revisited,
by D.M. Roberts
a pictorial history of
the
town of Fishkill, NY. Fishkill
14, 2011
. .,
Christopher
Blasie
('07MA)
returned to
the
airline
industry
with a new job as man-
ager at US Airways for its
hub
city
in
Washington, DC.
a
Randeep
Dang
(MS)
welcomed a baby girl,
Nimer, born Oct. 27, 2011.
e
Sarah
Lufler
became engaged to Timothy
Bumpus of Jamesville, NY. They
plan to marry on Aug. 24, 2012, in
Bristol,
RI. .,
Sam Mondesando
and his wife, Corinne, welcomed a
son, Matthew Joseph, born Nov. 16,
2011.
a
Marybeth Post
now
teaches
students with disabilities, after 10
years of teaching
upper
elemen-
tary grades. Marybeth married
Adam Bellinger on Oct. 8, 2011.
s
Philip
Walsh
and his wife,
Diana
not
only housed George Washington but served as a
supply depot and barracks for the Continental Army from
1776
until 1783.
Part of Arcadia Publishing's
Images
of America series, the
book
picks
up where the
1996
volume
Around Fishkill left off and features photos
provided by local
historical
societies.
It
is
available through retailers,
online bookstores, or www.arcadiapublishing.com.
If
you would like news of your book included in Alumni Authors, please
send the title, the name of publisher, the date of publication, a PDF of the
book's cover, and a description of the content to editor@marist.edu
or to
Alumni Authors, clo Marist magazine, Advancement, Marist College,
3399
North Rd., Poughkeepsie,
NY
12601-1387-
More than 30 hockey alumni traveled
back
to the Mid-Hudson Civic Center
in Poughkeepsie to
participate in
a
hockey
alumni game on Feb. 4. More
than 40 alumni and guests attended a
luncheon
following the game and
raised
$650
for the Mari
st
Hockey
Program. If you would
like
to contribute
to the
program, please
contact the Office
of
College Advancement at
(845)
575-FUND
(3863)
or e-mail maristalumni@marist.edu.
(Gennaro)
'oo,
welcomed their sec-
ond child, Brady Joseph,
born
Dec.
22, 2011. Their daughter, Savannah
Mae,
loves
being a big sister'
~MUsiM~C
,,
2002
Kevin
Hogan
and his wife, Katie,
welcomed a baby
boy,
Jack, born
Sept. 22, 2011
e
Edward
Nini
and
his wife, Catherine, welcomed
their first child, Grace Catherine,
born Jan. 10, 2011.
e
Jennifer
Stewart
married Gus Ellison in
May 2011.
2003
Bradley Cook
married Sarah
Brady on Aug. 6, 2011.
"Cherese
(Demme) Cosentino
and her
husband, Brian, welcomed a
baby girl,
born Jan.
17, 2011.
"'
Andrew Cox
began
his
last year of
pharmacy school at the University
of
Pittsburgh.
s
Brian Keida
married
Colleen Stacy
in
September 2010
and they recently purchased a home
in Atlanta. Brian was promoted to
manager at PwC, LLP.
e
Dennis
Piaquadio
and
Dana Kaplan
'04
married
July
11,
2009. The couple
welcomed a
baby
boy, Alex Joseph,
"A.).,"
born
Oct. 21, 2011.
2004
Douglas
and
Carin
(Pedersen)
DePerry
welcomed a
baby
girl,
Anna, born in
December
2011.
e
Dana Kaplan
and
Dennis
Piaquadio
'03
married July
11,
2009. The couple welcomed a baby
boy,
Alex Joseph, "A.).,"
born
Oct.
21,
2011.
2005
Dana Christian
('o8MPA)
became
director of licensing and opera-
tion at the New York State Liquor




































Jim Kutter
'99
(far
left) and Aisha
(Wright)
Kutter
'oo
(second
fro111
right), husband and wife and co-founders
of
KutterGroup LLC, received the Hudson Valley Gateway
Chaml~er
of
Commerce's
Chairman's Award at the
chamber's 31st annual
awards dinner in January
2012
at the Mansion at
Colonial
Terrace in
Cortlandt
Manor, NY.
The Kutters received the honor for their firm's redesign and relaunch of the chamber's Web
site.
Pictured with
the Kutters are (left to right)
chamber
board
chair
Bill Powers, chamber executive director Deborah Milone, and
dinner
chair Cathy
Montaldo.
Authority
in
December
2011.
a
Ashley
Pendlebury
is studying
translation
and interpretation
at Montclair
State University
while working full time at Safe in
Hunterdon.
She also was accepted
into the translation master's pro-
gram at Rutgers University. Ashley
will study at Rutgers after she
receives
her translation certificate
at Montclair.
2006
Jaime Petro
married
Patrick Howell
on
Dec.
10, 2011,
in Spring
Lake,
NJ.
.,
Christopher Wasilewski
married
Elizabeth Kovach on Oct.
28, 2011.
Christopher has been a police officer
in Connecticut for four years.
lznam•n•
.,
2007
Bethany
Bohlin
('llMA)
and
Brian
Hodge
married on
Oct. 9, 2011, on Cape Cod in
Massachusetts,
surrounded
by
family, friends, and several Marist
alumni. The couple honeymooned
in
South Africa and Paris before
returning
home to Pawtucket,
RI. Bethany is the senk>r product
specialist at Collette Vacations, an
international
group tour opera-
tor. Brian is the communications
and social media manager at the
Providence Warwick Convention
and Visitors Bureau.
1n
Charles
Engle
and
Kelly
Schenker
recently
married. They met at Marist dur-
ing their freshman yea1r. Charles
has accepted a new
poi;ition
at
JP
Morgan
in
London, where they will
relocate in
2012.
2008
J.P. Glowatz
graduated from the
University of New Hampshire
School of Law in May
2011.
He
passed
the New Jersey- and New
York bar exams and is currently a
contractor with DuPont's: trademark
legal
department
in
Wiilmington,
DE.
a
Lauren
Goodwin
began
working as the communications
associate for the New York Junior
League
in
January
2012,
managing
internal
and external communica-
tions as well as assisting with social
media efforts.
"
Nicole Krause
is
l'JlliliH'I:
The
flag denotes classes
that will celebrate
reunions
in
2012.
J.P.
Glowatz
'08
pursuing an MA in special educa-
tion from SCSU. She is a develop-
mental therapist at Rehabilitation
Associates of Connecticut,
Inc.
2009
Nicole Fortanasce
received
a
mas-
ter's
in
literacy studies
in
May
2011.
"
Margeaux
Lippman
is pursuing
a doctorate at
the
University of
Washington
in
communication with
an emphasis in rhetoric and criti-
cal/cultural studies. She recently
completed her MA at Pepperdine
University
in
communication.
a
Lindsey
Pritzlaff
accepted a posi-
In
Memo1•ia1n
Former Trustee
Mortimer
W. Hall
Faculty and Staff
Diane
Benjamin
Susan
Duchene
Lachapelle
Victoria
Powell
Mary
Spinella
Ludwig
A.
zurNieden
Friends
Claire
Gagan
Kevin
P.
Johnson
David
Latvis
Susan
Henrietta
MacDonald
Alumni
Bro.
James
Venantius
Gaffney,
FMS,
'53
Frank
J. McNiff
'55
Bro.
Edward
F.
Vollmer,
FMS,
'55
Bro.
Raoul
J. Molnar,
FMS,
'63
Timothy
J. Dooley
'64
Robert
A.
Gillen
'65
Christian
Michael
Hynes
'65
Paul
Joseph
Nigra
'65
Leonard
K.
Supple
'65
Richard
Duffee
'67
Marley
F.
Jones
'67
William
R.
Howell
'68
John
T. Kinsella
'68
Bro.
Louis
Bentivegna,
FMS,
'69
William
Bitter
'70
Stephen
H. Desch
'74
D.
James
O'Neil
'74
Stephen
J.
Harrison
'77
Lillian
M. Biktjorn
'78
Tamara
Gloria
Murley
Gomez
'78
Christina
A. Hetsco
'78
Gregory
Settembre
'78
Walter
D.
Jarvis
'84
1st.
Lt.
Terrence
I.
Wing
'91
Audrey
A. Bloom
'93
Stephen
Romeo
'93
Jason
Jones
'04
Henry
Gutierrez
'07
Frank
Mascolo
'07
Students
Eva
R. Block
Kerry
R. Fitzsimons
SPRING
2012
23
































tion with Make-A-Wish
Foundation
of New Jersey as director of com-
munications. She worked at CBS for
three years following graduation.
2010
Joseph
Castellano
(MPA)
is an
active member of several profes-
sional organizations including the
American Society for Industrial
Security, where he obtained acer-
tified protection professional (CPP)
designation.
In
the spring of 2011,
Joe was
published
in a professional
journal,
Security Director
Magazine.
G1
Cynthia
Fuller
lives
in Kunming,
China, where she tutors students
in English. She is also studying
Jeffrey
M.
Schanz
'94/'99MPA
24
MARIST
MAGAZINE
Mandarin. She
lives
with her sec-
ond family and teaches as a private
instructor.
m
Christina Graziano
is teaching at a private college for
autism and couldn't be
happier.
She
writes that her experience at Marist
gave
her
the ability to have such a
great job.
"
Stephanie Moshier
is
teaching seventh and eighth grade
science
in
the Spackenkill School
District
in
Poughkeepsie. She is
pursuing a master's in special educa-
tion at Grand Canyon University.
"
Matt Snow
graduated from the 53rd
Municipal Police Officers class on
Dec. 2, 2011. He
is
a police officer in
the town of Bridgewater, MA.
2011
Keith
Carielli (MA)
obtained a
position in the Wappingers Central
School District as a school psycholo-
gist immediately following gradu-
ation in May 2011 with a master's
in school
psychology.
He recently
attended SPEAK training, which
he says has prepared him to train
individuals
about suicide prevention
and awareness. He is excited about
his new
career and
thanks
Marist
for
providing
him with the skills
and abilities to be successful.
a
Amy
Ciaramella
is
going back to school
to study nursing.
"
Cheri
Fraiman
is vice president of human resources
Alumnus Named Professional of the Year
J
effrey M. Schanz '94/'99MPA, assistant vice president for alumni
relations at
Rensselaer
Polytechnic
Institute
and executive director
of the
Rensselaer
Alumni Association,
has
been named the Council for
Advancement and Support of
Education's
(CASE) District II Professional
of the Year. The award
recognizes
an institutional advancement profes-
sional who has
demonstrated
exceptional achievement in the
develop-
ment of an institutional advancement program or innovative execution
of programs.
Schanz has worked in
higher
education for more than 16 years.
He
served as director of alumni relations at Marist
until
2000, when
he
joined
the alumni relations staff at Rensselaer.
In
2003, he was
named director
of alumni
relations there
and
in
2008
became
assistant vice president
for alumni relations.
He
also served as
president
of the Marist Alumni
Association from 2008 to 2010.
Under Schanz's leadership at
Rensselaer,
alumni programs have
received
national
and regional
recognition,
including 18 CASE Circle of
Excellence and Accolades awards.
for an investment firm
in
New York
City.
a
Alexandra
Hodovanu
began
working for Macy's in October
2011 as a merchant office assistant
in
the men's basics department.
G1
Rev.
George Kyeremeh
(MA)
was
appointed director of the Diocesan
Pastoral and Retreat Center in
Sunyani, Ghana, where he will help
set
up
a counseling center and offer
retreats for groups and individuals.
He also was appointed chaplain
of the Diocesan Laity Council.
a
Daniel Pearles
is a second lieu-
tenant in the U.S. Army and will
complete the Military Police Officer
Leaders Course
in
August before
deploying to Cuba in 2013.
m
Oliver
Roe
was recently promoted to sales/
purchasing contract administrator
for the northeast region of Bunzl
Distributors. His duties include
overseeing key account margin
compliance for
the
region and
improving
reporting
processes.
a
Laura Veltre
is
a facility coordina-
tor for HotCam NY, a broadcast
rental house for television and film.
a
Christopher
Walker
landed
a
full-time job and
has
his own apart-
ment.
He
loves
where
he
works and
is
also playing music
in
a band. "Life
is
good."
m
Madison
Weber
planned
to move to Germany in January to
be an au pair.

jpuml·IZ:
The
flag denotts classes
that will celebrate
reunions in 2012.













Be part of the historic
Campaign for Marist and
make your own history!
Y
ou
are invited to become a
founding member
of the
Marist College Legacy
Society,
a recently formed circle of valued individuals-alumni, trustees, friends,
active and retired faculty and staff, parents, and grandparents-who
have provided
for Marist
in
their estate plans and wish
to inspire
others
to
do the same. Join by
Dec. 31, 2012,
the concluding date of The Campaign for Marist, and you and other
founding members will receive
special recognition
for your leadership.
To
join the Marist College
Legacy
Society,
you may:
*
Provide
for Marist in
your
will, trust, or other estate plan
*
Designate Marist
as
the beneficiary of a qualified
retirement plan, savings bonds, or life insurance policy
*
Create a life-income plan, such as a charitable gift annuity,
which provides income to you or others and a gift to Marist
Helpful information is just a click away ...
Marist's new
Planned Giving Web pages
have age-tailored information and useful
tools to show how estate planning can provide peace of mind for you and loved
ones, while also allowing you to support Marist in a meaningful way. Information
at
www.marist.edu/plannedgiving
can easily be shared with your financial advisor.
MARIST
For further
information
or to notify Mari st of your estate plan intention and desire
to join
the
Legacy
Society,
please contact
Shaileen Kopec,
Senior
Development
Officer for Planned Giving and Endowment Support,
at Marist College, 3399
North
Road, Poughkeepsie,
NY
12601;
shaileen.kopec@marist.edu;
or
(845)
575-3468











MARIST
Marisl
College
Poughkeepsie,
NY 12601-) 387
Electronic Service
Requested
Thank
You
for your particip,ation in
The Campaign
fo Marist
Nonprofit
Org.
U.S.
Postage
PAID
Marist
College


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